Page 1 of 2
#1
Is this a good or bad thing? I mean I'll be exposed to another type of music, but I want to learn a lot of metal. I've been taking lessons with him for about 5 months now. The teacher I have is pretty old and has been teaching for 45+ years. I'm not saying he's a bad teacher, in fact he's a great teacher. There's nothing wrong with him. He has shown me a lot. But I dunno if I should look for a teacher who is a metalhead. I feel like I could learn a whole lot more since that's what I mostly like to play anyway. Or should I just stick to the one I have now?
#2
dude a lot of metal is based off blues. Try black sabbath, metallica, megadeth, etc..They're all blues influenced. Plus, it's not like you have to work on blues stuff only. Work on metal stuff on your own. don't take a good teacher for granted. a lot of my friends have crappy teachers, and i'm so happy i have a good one.
#3
my old teacher was as metalhead and it was fun.

he'd just play a quick rhythm and let me wail over it.

and he also taught me all i need to know about modes (which are needed for a majority of metal).


it was fun with him.
#4
metal is based on blues so.........
just incorperate them into one another. be the first blues/ metal guitarist that is really famous, haha
Member #19 of the "Use Your Fucking Dictionary Club."

Quote by chaoticmayhem
Toads are cool; it's those frog bastards that I don't like.


Whats your philosophy on life?
its so good to be back!
#5
+1 to spam

Same thing happened to me and it opened my eyes to different styles of music and, I think, made my metal soloing more dynamic because of it
#6
dude i learned to play metal from a c****ry gospel singer and guitarist he taught me a lot of blues and it has hepled my metal riffing besides dude look at dime king and wylde they learned blues first keep rocking
THE KREATOR OF THE ALL METAL AND KERRY KING GROUP PM ME TO JOIN
Proud BLACK 13 Owner
RIP Charles Michael "Chuck" Schuldiner THE FATHER OF DEATH METAL
GOD HATES US ALL-SLAYER
#7
blues is awesome, and metals takin a lot from it, enjoy it

i have a jazz teacher and hes amazing
Staff Sergeant of The Megadeth Military
PM BlackicN to join

Archbishop of Zeppelinism
PM heartbreaker

Gear
Guitars
ESP LTD MH1000
Fender 50th Anniversary Strat
81 Gibson SG
Parker PM20
Amps
Fender Hotrod Deluxe
Roland Cube 60x
#8
Quote by The*Music*Man
metal is based on blues so.........
just incorperate them into one another. be the first blues/ metal guitarist that is really famous, haha


Tony Iommi and Zakk Wylde both could be considered blues/metal.

also, the blues and metal mixture is the most overused way people play the blues. now i am not an elitist blues player, i am just stating my experiences and what i have seen everywhere. While it is a style, it is and has already been in use for decades.

hmm, maybe i am just bitter towards the blues/metal mixture because i lost my district's GC King of the Blues competition to a metal head. ( he played very well and is very talented but the judges the week before had told us they didn't want the blues/metal mixture because it was so over done. then they changed the judges for the final and one judge was a metal head- judging a blues comp- and scored the metal head ridiculously high.) second place isn't that bad...

why not have two teachers?
Quote by happytimeharry
ig·no·rant

1. Lacking education or knowledge.
2. Showing or arising from a lack of education or knowledge: an ignorant mistake.
3. Unaware or uninformed.

also see: elitist asshat
#9
While blues is the basis for metal, that is exactly what it is.. a simplified version.

I find blues to be fun, but definantly very limited.

I could see a blues teacher limiting your skill by only teaching you blues, yes.

Does he have knowledge of different theory / approaches to teaching the guitar? if not consider moving on to more advanced lessons, if you feel like you aren't learning anything anymore.

If you still feel as if you're learning after each lesson a significant amount, stick with it.
#10
Well he's also teaching me theory. And how to impro using scales and what not. He plays pretty fast for his age but I mean technical skill wise he's not the best. I feel if I were taking lessons from a metalhead I could learn a lot more.
#11
meh, maybe not a metalhead but a teacher who doesn't consider theirselfs a "blues teacher", or "metal teacher" or "rock teacher".. but just a guitar teacher, that can teach you how to know your instrument in and out.
#12
Every kind of different experience is good to learn. Of the different teachers I've had, one of them was a very old and very experienced jazz musician. I did it purposely for a learning experience, and it was. Jazz isn't my specialty and thats where I learned a lot of my advanced theory and chord extensions.

Plus like other people said, Blues is very basic and was the birthplace of metal and rock
#13
yeah, i never really had the passion for blues music.

its fun to play, i enjoy blues music.. but to stick to that genre as the main / only type of music i listen to just seems ridiculous
#14
You're the one (or your parents) paying him; it's not unreasonable to ask him to teach you want you want to learn!

You can benefit from learning blues, though. For instance, when a group of musicians gets together, the first thing they usually play is a Blues in E.

A lot of metal is based on the blues. Hammett and Mustaine use a lot (some say too much) blues stuff in their playing. And so do they shred guys; listen to "Crushing Day" by Satriani.

Playing blues will also teach you about taste and restraint. You may be able to play 25 nps, but how often is that necessary?

You may want to find a new or additional teacher. You may want to work on some metal stuff with the current guy. Those are your decisions to make, but you're going to learn good things with this blues guy.

Edit: And once you turn 35, you will play lots of blues/rock, so I suggest being able to play that genre.
#15
I had a blues teacher once: worst thing that ever happened to me. For 5 months he taught me pentatonic, and 12-bar. I only recently learned the modes and more exotic scales.

But if he's well-rounded, it's fine. I'd suggest a jazz guitarist for a teacher though.

EDIT: There's also only so much you can learn about blues playing (Hence why 5 months was so ludicrous), so he may run out of material in a while.
Dickless.
#16
I stayed focused on just using the penatonic minor/major scales for a long time, not a bad thing at all. You learn how to really use that scale to create such a wide sound, that once you start dealing with the major scale it helps your phrasing.
#17
Quote by MetalMilitia212
EDIT: There's also only so much you can learn about blues playing (Hence why 5 months was so ludicrous), so he may run out of material in a while.

I've been playing blues for years and still find things challenging. Playing three chords is easy, playing the blues is endless learning. Don't take simple music for granted.

My advice is that if blues is the only thing he is teaching you, and you want to learn more, then either talk to you're teacher or start looking for a new one. I'm not saying jump ship straight away, a good teacher is a good teacher, but if you feel it isn't right then you have the right to look for someone else.
I say this because i had three guitar teachers who weren't right for me before i found mine, and i stayed with them because i found it convenient. Music is about enjoyment, and if you aren't getting what you want then feel free to move. It's not a crime.
#18
Quote by Peaceful Rocker
While blues is the basis for metal, that is exactly what it is.. a simplified version.

I find blues to be fun, but definantly very limited.

I could see a blues teacher limiting your skill by only teaching you blues, yes.

Does he have knowledge of different theory / approaches to teaching the guitar? if not consider moving on to more advanced lessons, if you feel like you aren't learning anything anymore.

If you still feel as if you're learning after each lesson a significant amount, stick with it.

wtf are you talkin about blues doesn't limit you im starting to move from rock to blues now and i feel so much more freed try listening to the genre and playing it then tell us its limiting.
Quote by Eliyahu
Mr.Cuddles killed The Metal!!!! FUCK YES!

Quote by TheReverend724
Mr Cuddles pretty much nailed it...

Quote by thanksgiving

"Oh Mr.Cuddles, you make my pants go boom boom. I are horny. Do not disappoint I"


Viscara (my band)
#19
Quote by Chris_Sleeps
I've been playing blues for years and still find things challenging. Playing three chords is easy, playing the blues is endless learning. Don't take simple music for granted.

My advice is that if blues is the only thing he is teaching you, and you want to learn more, then either talk to you're teacher or start looking for a new one. I'm not saying jump ship straight away, a good teacher is a good teacher, but if you feel it isn't right then you have the right to look for someone else.
I say this because i had three guitar teachers who weren't right for me before i found mine, and i stayed with them because i found it convenient. Music is about enjoyment, and if you aren't getting what you want then feel free to move. It's not a crime.

Like what? There's 12-bar blues, the blues scale, and pentatonic. It's the most limited genre I can bring to mind.

Quote by Mr.Cuddles
wtf are you talkin about blues doesn't limit you im starting to move from rock to blues now and i feel so much more freed try listening to the genre and playing it then tell us its limiting.


*Listens to BB King, Muddy Waters, and Stevie Ray Vaughan*

Blues is limiting.
Dickless.
#20
Quote by MetalMilitia212
Like what? There's 12-bar blues, the blues scale, and pentatonic. It's the most limited genre I can bring to mind.


*Listens to BB King, Muddy Waters, and Stevie Ray Vaughan*

Blues is limiting.


Blues isn't limiting - you're limitED.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#21
Quote by steven seagull
Blues isn't limiting - you're limitED.


+1

What makes blues great to learn on is:

o The format (I-IV-V) is almost always the same (to me it also makes it a bit boring to sit through a whole blues show or listen to much of it, but it doesn't matter)

o Rock and Jazz both have blues roots. Understanding blues helps understand those

o It has some surprising subtleties thay make it quite a challenge to play it well.
Some people can take a minor pentatonic/blues scale and sound pretty good over
a rock progression, but can't play over blues at all. It can teach you quite a bit
about following the chord changes and being able to combine a number of scales in
1 song.


For those reasons and others I do practice a lot of Blues stuff even though it's not
a genre I care for a whole lot.
#22
Dude youre not alone. I'm a metalhead and I have a blues teacher as well. The stuff he's taught me has improved my technical skill so much though, so if you're learning stick with it.

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
VHT Deliverance

#23
I would get a new teacher who will teach metal AND other types of music. Blues will help you but many tradition blues players won't play the blues like contemporary players.
#24
Quote by steven seagull
Blues isn't limiting - you're limitED.

Nope, blues is limiting.

Here's an experiment: Master blues, then master jazz or shred or classical or something.

I'm not trying to insult blues at all, I love blues, but there's no denying that it's an extremely repetitive genre. If you ask anyone on the street, they'll probably say all blues solos sound exactly the same.
Dickless.
#26
If the music you're playing is limiting then you're playing it wrong.

Consider deeply, please.
#27
Quote by giantsfanftw
Is this a good or bad thing? I mean I'll be exposed to another type of music, but I want to learn a lot of metal. I've been taking lessons with him for about 5 months now. The teacher I have is pretty old and has been teaching for 45+ years. I'm not saying he's a bad teacher, in fact he's a great teacher. There's nothing wrong with him. He has shown me a lot. But I dunno if I should look for a teacher who is a metalhead. I feel like I could learn a whole lot more since that's what I mostly like to play anyway. Or should I just stick to the one I have now?


every peice of music you'd listen to today that comes from america is derrivative from blues.

you see...

blues led to RB, led to rock n roll led to everything else today.

blues is the best.

i used to want to play only metal and fast lick and ****.

its NOT where its at.

learning all types of the music is the way to go- then you have all this repertoire under your belt. you'd have soooo much experience and knowledge of different styles, you could make up your own and make your guitar sound the exact way you want it to.

personally- i say **** metal.

be yourself though. its your decision
#28
Quote by MetalMilitia212
Nope, blues is limiting.

Here's an experiment: Master blues, then master jazz or shred or classical or something.

I'm not trying to insult blues at all, I love blues, but there's no denying that it's an extremely repetitive genre. If you ask anyone on the street, they'll probably say all blues solos sound exactly the same.

there's no such thing as a "limiting" genre or style, if you ask anyone in the street they'd also tell you that all jazz solos sound the same and all metal solos sound the same. "Shred" isn't really a genre, you'd use that term do describe any guitarist who exhibits an exceptional level of technical ability no matter what genre they play.

There's only one thing that limits a guitarist and thats their own lack of knowledge and their own lack of abilit..wait, that's two. Ok, there's only two things that limit a guitarist - lack of knowledge or lack of ability.

Or lack of imagination...bollocks, that's THREE now!

...I'll come in again.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#29
i'm a metal head and my guitar instructor is a jazz guitarist. he's the **** though. he's helped me a lot and now we're doing paul gilbert licks.
#30
Quote by MetalMilitia212

Here's an experiment: Master blues, then master jazz or shred or classical or something.


And, what do you suppose the outcome of your "experiment" would be? And,
what's the point? If you master blues, you'd still be a beginner at the others,
or if you master the others you've already mastered blues? I think not (except
maybe the jazz -> blues case. *The* most frequent jazz progression played
is blues.)
#31
Everyone here is giving him horrible advice, if he wants to learn metal then he should get a teacher who teaches metal or more rock type things. Blues IS a HUGE HUGE influence of these genres, but its hard to put things together for metal from learning blues if you are just beginning.. i phrased that horribly. It would be much easier to get a teacher for metal if thats what he is going for. Or like I said, get a teacher who teaches everything, I have a teacher who is into shred, prog metal, jazz, blues and r & b, etc. Our jams are crazy fun and there is never a lesson that I don't learn something very valuable. Teaching just blues on the other hand, will make you good and of course more proficient, but you still won't have that "metal feel".. if you catch my drift? Playing blues you will learn loads of the same things that you will playing any other genre, but not all of those things carry over onto other genres of music, mainly the feel and phrasing you obtain from playing certain types of music.
#32
Quote by MetalMilitia212
If you ask anyone on the street, they'll probably say all blues solos sound exactly the same.


That could be said about any genre whatsoever.

Quote by ouchies
. . . It would be much easier to get a teacher for metal if thats what he is going for. . .


I understand what you mean by that, but what about all of the people who "invented" metal? Did they go to some guitar teacher who then taught them to play like that? No, they developed that style as a derivative of what they knew before, that being blues.

In my mind, there's no reason to learn any specific style, except to be able to emulate it. By doing that, you will be able to play great metal solos, or shred like crazy, but that doesn't mean you will develop as a musician. I know I would much rather have a teacher who inspires me to take what I like from different genres and meld it together into my own style than one who could make me amazing at shredding in record time.
Strat / SH-201 -> DOD Mixer -> ZVex Mastotron -> Fulltone Clyde -> BYOC OD II -> Ibanez FLL -> VS Chorus -> DOD FX 96 -> Boss DD-6 -> MXR 10-Band EQ -> Boss RC-2 -> Stereo Mixer -> Alesis PicoVerb -> Peavey Delta Blues 210/Yamaha Fifty112
Last edited by seedmole at Jan 31, 2008,
#33
Quote by seedmole
That could be said about any genre whatsoever.


I understand what you mean by that, but what about all of the people who "invented" metal? Did they go to some guitar teacher who then taught them to play like that? No, they developed that style as a derivative of what they knew before, that being blues.

In my mind, there's no reason to learn any specific style, except to be able to emulate it. By doing that, you will be able to play great metal solos, or shred like crazy, but that doesn't mean you will develop as a musician. I know I would much rather have a teacher who inspires me to take what I like from different genres and meld it together into my own style than one who could make me amazing at shredding in record time.


Okay, everyone is just being stubborn. OBVIOUSLY, metal came from Blues but it more so came from classical music. Everything influences everything, but does blues sound like metal? Hell. no. They will have similarities at points but unless you are completely retarded, you will be able to tell the difference. Metal isn't all about shredding, listen to dream theater, soloing has an element of speed but thats not all it is.

I am NOT encouraging just learning metal, as I stated before, I know how to play almost any style, except maybe country, but if HE wants to learn metal then he should get a metal teacher. Its that simple, if he is learning music he doesn't have a passion for, then he won't progress as far.
#34
Quote by ouchies
Okay, everyone is just being stubborn. OBVIOUSLY, metal came from Blues but it more so came from classical music. Everything influences everything, but does blues sound like metal? Hell. no. They will have similarities at points but unless you are completely retarded, you will be able to tell the difference. Metal isn't all about shredding, listen to dream theater, soloing has an element of speed but thats not all it is.

I am NOT encouraging just learning metal, as I stated before, I know how to play almost any style, except maybe country, but if HE wants to learn metal then he should get a metal teacher. Its that simple, if he is learning music he doesn't have a passion for, then he won't progress as far.


I guess my post was probably subconsciously designed to try to get the TS to change his mind, since being able to play metal songs written by other people really well doesn't sound that fun to me. But yeah, if he wants to do that, then getting a teacher who is more focused on metal would be the best course of action.
Strat / SH-201 -> DOD Mixer -> ZVex Mastotron -> Fulltone Clyde -> BYOC OD II -> Ibanez FLL -> VS Chorus -> DOD FX 96 -> Boss DD-6 -> MXR 10-Band EQ -> Boss RC-2 -> Stereo Mixer -> Alesis PicoVerb -> Peavey Delta Blues 210/Yamaha Fifty112
#35
Quote by seedmole
I guess my post was probably subconsciously designed to try to get the TS to change his mind, since being able to play metal songs written by other people really well doesn't sound that fun to me. But yeah, if he wants to do that, then getting a teacher who is more focused on metal would be the best course of action.


Nonono, thats not what I was stating either, sorry for the confusion. Lets say, you were jamming with a blues player in the key of Am. A blues player would look at you very oddly if you busted out an E Phrygian Dominant lick over an E7, and the teacher would probably say "never do that again", however a metal teacher would think its okay and maybe give a lesson on that scale and using. Do you get it? This is kind of a crappy example but I hope it makes sense.
#36
Quote by ouchies
never do that again"


Haha, yeah I see what you're saying. A metal teacher would be more likely to take notice of certain things that you would be able to use when playing things of that genre, and help you develop those.
Strat / SH-201 -> DOD Mixer -> ZVex Mastotron -> Fulltone Clyde -> BYOC OD II -> Ibanez FLL -> VS Chorus -> DOD FX 96 -> Boss DD-6 -> MXR 10-Band EQ -> Boss RC-2 -> Stereo Mixer -> Alesis PicoVerb -> Peavey Delta Blues 210/Yamaha Fifty112
#37
I was the exact opposite. I was into blues and funk, and had a metal teacher (my neighbor, haha).

He showed me incredibly valuable information, and some lame metal licks too. I discarded what I didn't like, and kept the things like patterns and theory and some neat licks that were metal if you cranked up the treble and distortion, but nice and bluesy if you used a clean, warm tone.

Try turning that blues stuff up and playing it really fast and maybe you'll see that the two are very close to each other.

Oh, and some shameless self promotion....here's me and my band http://media.putfile.com/Born-Under-a-Bad-Sign-
#38
Well the teacher I have can play metal along with other things. It's not like he's one dimensional. But he seems very focused on blues/theory. He's teaching me a lot. But the thing is, while he knows a lot of music theory(he's been involved with it basically his whole life) it seems technical skill wise he's not really the best. So I'm thinking I should get another teacher with a lot of technical skill and plays metal AND teaches theory. I also want to learn classical guitar but the teacher I have now doesn't know it. But I dunno where to find teachers anyway. Only reason I know about the blues guy is because a friend told me about him. I live in NJ so anybody in NJ know any good teachers?
#39
If you go to a guitar or music store, you should be able to get the names/numbers of local instructors.

But unless you can find one who knows just as much about theory as the one you have, I would suggest staying with your teacher. It's like having a coach for a sports team. Would you rather have Kobe Bryant as your coach, or Phil Jackson? I'm sure Kobe could out-play Phil, but I would rather have a teacher who knows a lot of the theory behind it, rather than one who could just play really fast.

Sorry for the Lakers reference... LA 4 LYF
Strat / SH-201 -> DOD Mixer -> ZVex Mastotron -> Fulltone Clyde -> BYOC OD II -> Ibanez FLL -> VS Chorus -> DOD FX 96 -> Boss DD-6 -> MXR 10-Band EQ -> Boss RC-2 -> Stereo Mixer -> Alesis PicoVerb -> Peavey Delta Blues 210/Yamaha Fifty112
#40
You've been having lessons for 5 months - that's nothing. As far as lead guitar and improvising goes the blues is a nice, stable framework to operate in and the perfect place to start...if you can't pull off a decent blues solo you've got no chance of managing a rock or metal one. Chances are your teacher doesn't feel you're far along enough for more advanced stuff yet and he's probably right, you have to walk before you can run.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
Page 1 of 2