#1
I am wondering what exactly makes a decent classical player. If I could play something like pagannini's 24th caprice cleanly, do you think I have a shot at being a good classical player, or is that something that is pretty standard for most average players, I ask because I see millions of covers of Hendrix songs and Zeppelin songs on youtube, so I'm wondering if that's analagous to Pagannini. My interests are everything from classical to Tool, but I would one day like to just play classical for people and I'm wondering what makes someone profficient enough to play for for an audience. The technical and musical aspects aren't a problem, it's just I don't know what is considered good or not. I've learned how to read sheet music, and I'd say in a month or two I could sight read something by Pagannini, I guess my question is what sets a classical player above the rest, btw I have learned a buttload of theory so don't lecture me on learning theory.
#2
The classical performance tradition is the art of clear and concise recreation. The quality of the performance is not so much defined by its note perfectness, but in the truthfulness to the original music. The score, it's expressive markings, and the historical context must all be taken into account when performing, and ideally that must be performed precisely, but there is still more to the classical performance than just automation. And that is depth.

The depth I speak of is not always clearly defined within the score and is entirely within the confines of the performer. It is ultimately what I consider to be a process where the piece is endowed with meaning or reason. It is an insight that gazes into what precedes the notes. That depth is the artistry of it all, and like all things of worth, it must be pursued.
#3
Quote by Erc
The classical performance tradition is the art of clear and concise recreation. The quality of the performance is not so much defined by its note perfectness, but in the truthfulness to the original music. The score, it's expressive markings, and the historical context must all be taken into account when performing, and ideally that must be performed precisely, but there is still more to the classical performance than just automation. And that is depth.

The depth I speak of is not always clearly defined within the score and is entirely within the confines of the performer. It is ultimately what I consider to be a process where the piece is endowed with meaning or reason. It is an insight that gazes into what precedes the notes. That depth is the artistry of it all, and like all things of worth, it must be pursued.


yeah, thanks, I know that. But playing ode to joy isn't exactly going to get me a standing ovation no matter how it's played.