#1
I'm not sure that this is the correct board for this question, but since the question does involve a part of a guitar, here goes.

I noticed that the bridges on strats and teles may saddle the strings at slightly different distances from the neck, relative to each other. The bridges on Gibsons have all the strings saddled at an even position. Wouldn't the differences of position of the string saddles affect the intonation up the fretboard? I'm not really an expert at the intonation schemes of guitars. If someone knows what they're talking about, could he or she please clarify?
#2
...gibson tune-o-matics still have individual saddles that can be moved for intonation. look closer at one.
#3
Both bridge types are individually adjustable, the intonation on a guitar wont be perfect straight outa the factory, so where you see these saddles in different positions on guitars is where some one has set up the intonation so it is correct for that guitar.




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#4
Quote by Breakfast_Rock
I'm not sure that this is the correct board for this question, but since the question does involve a part of a guitar, here goes.

I noticed that the bridges on strats and teles may saddle the strings at slightly different distances from the neck, relative to each other. The bridges on Gibsons have all the strings saddled at an even position. Wouldn't the differences of position of the string saddles affect the intonation up the fretboard? I'm not really an expert at the intonation schemes of guitars. If someone knows what they're talking about, could he or she please clarify?
Red = wrong. Look closer.
Meadows
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#5
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
Red = wrong. Look closer.


I'm not an expert. That's why I asked you guys
#6
So is it really hard to properly position the saddles? Seeming how each each not along the fretboard must be in tune.... I don't know, just thinking about how hard it would be to assemble a guitar.
#7
Quote by Breakfast_Rock
So is it really hard to properly position the saddles? Seeming how each each not along the fretboard must be in tune.... I don't know, just thinking about how hard it would be to assemble a guitar.
No, that part is really very easy. All you need is a tuner, a screwdriver, and a little time.
Meadows
Quote by Jackal58
I release my inner liberal every morning when I take a shit.
Quote by SK8RDUDE411
I wont be like those jerks who dedicate their beliefs to logic and reaosn.
#8
So is it really hard to properly position the saddles? Seeming how each each not along the fretboard must be in tune.... I don't know, just thinking about how hard it would be to assemble a guitar.


I think the idea here is how to get the correct bridge placement when building a guitar right?

Not that difficult, especially with adjustable saddles. The bridge should be placed so the centerline of the bridge is the same distance from the 12th fret (octave) as the nut is from the 12th fret. That distance depends on the scale length, the total length from nut to bridge.

So if you're building a guitar on a 24" scale length, to make it easy, the 12th fret will be 12" from the nut, so the bridge needs to be 12" from the 12th fret also. From there the adjustable saddles allow fine tuning to get the intonation right, which is why you see saddles in different positions, not in a straight line. some guitars do intonate in a fairly straight line, but it's more common by far to see them set at much different lengths.

Bridge position = half the scale length from 12th fret. If you don't know the scale length, just measure from the nut to the 12th fret, multiply by 2, that's your scale length.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#9
I think the 12th to bridge distance should be slightly more that the nut to 12th fret measurement, due to the strings vibrating differently with their shorter length as you play higher up.
In the past, I've side stepped the theory and assembled the guitar with two E strings running over the not-yet-fixed-down-bridge. Then used a tuner to check the intonation and move the bridge into it's ideal place before actually getting the drill out. Long winded really but gives a perfect result.