#1
Hey. This summer I will be turning my basement that I do nothing with into a home recording studio. I was wondering if someone could tell me everything that I will need. I don't really care for specific brands at this point, I am just interested in knowing the basic equipment. I will be recording 2 guitars, bass, vocals, and drums. Any suggestions about a computer and recording software would be very helpful however. Thanks!
#2
Price range?
PM Me for any help you need with recording systems/tips
Quote by BrianApocalypse
Good call

Man, you should be a mod, you know everything.

#3
well just so i dont have to start the same exact thread, i dont mean to hijack but what are your recomendations for a low budget?
#5
guitar,,vocals,bass,drums. in that order of importance, i probably wont be able to buy all the stuff at once so ill just add it piece buy piece
#6
For bass, vocals, and guitar you could get away with a Shure SM57.
If you like warmer vocals, (like I do) then I suggest a condenser mic. The MXL 990/991 with Audio buddy preamp isnt a bad set for the price range.

To record drums on a budget I suggest two overhead mics. The MXL 991 mics may work ok but I suggest a matched pair of Rode NT5 mics if you can find a great deal on ebay.
http://www.zzounds.com/item--RODNT5 (look for a used set on ebay)

For mic positions this link is helpful:
http://studio-central.com/phpbb/viewtopic.php?t=52501


As for an interface, the USB units like the Line6 Toneport GX or UX1 are fine for a while as is the M-Audio FastTrack but after a while you may want to upgrade to a unit with better preamps on board like the Mackie Onyx Satellite which is firewire connected so you get a better quality compared to the small 1.1USB units.

If you are running Windows XP I suggest the following:
Mackie Onyx Satellite
MXL991 pair (drum overheads)
Shure SM57 for vocals, and cab micing
*optional* MXL 990/991 - 990 works well for vocals.
(This is a low budget setup, mics and interfaces can always be upgraded if you get more money.)

If you decide later down the line you want to add more drum mics you will either need a larger interface or a mixer to feed into the back of the Mackie interface you get now. The mixer setup is ok but you must really keep an eye on the levels because if one mic goes over for a take then your whole mix is done on that track so you would have to restart.

For home studios I suggest the whole small interface and mixer setup since pro results are normally not needed and budgets are normally low.
Last edited by moody07747 at Feb 2, 2008,
#7
Quote by Ghost901
Hey. This summer I will be turning my basement that I do nothing with into a home recording studio. I was wondering if someone could tell me everything that I will need. I don't really care for specific brands at this point, I am just interested in knowing the basic equipment. I will be recording 2 guitars, bass, vocals, and drums. Any suggestions about a computer and recording software would be very helpful however. Thanks!

http://www.tweakheadz.com/guide.htm
#8
As far as interfaces go, when you're looking to record drums and need multiple ins it's hard to beat the PreSonus FireStudio. It also comes with some nice bundled software. After that you'd really only need a couple of decent mics and a good computer (decent processor, massive RAM). SM-57's are the ultimate workhorse and can be used for guitar/bass/close-micing drums/backing vocals, so 3 of those would be nice. Add a pair of decent condensor mics for overheads on the drums and lead vox (they will also work very well when recording guitars, both electric and acoustic). Headphones for monitoring purposes, and some decent monitors for mixing. Acoustic treatment can be nice but you can fairly easily build your own bass traps and a couple of old duvets or mattresses will take care of most of the reflections.
#9
Actually the PreSonus FP10 is $100 less than the FireStudio and since he, (Thread starter) is most likley on a tight budget.

But yea it's probably best to get a PreSonus interface with 8 inputs from the start since you wont have to sell an interface later on down the road and youll be able to just buy mics and expand.
Last edited by moody07747 at Feb 2, 2008,
#10
Don't be suckered in to thinking that just because a mic is a condenser, it will be nice and warm. MANY condenser mics, even those regarded as the highest quality ring, are very bright, shrill mics, and won't do a thing to warm up your sound over a Sm57.
#11
I have no price range right now. I can spend as much money as i care to!
#12
You ALWAYS have a price range. If not, go out and buy yourself a nice ProTools HD setup, with full control boards, premium outboard preamps and effects, top of the line mics, and see how far that $250K got your sound.

We NEED to know how much you are ready and willing to spend, otherwise we're just flinging ****.
#13
^Exactly dude. TS I can easily recommend you over $100,000 (thats a comma, not a period) worth of equipment. If you truly can afford that much, bully for you. However, I have my doubts....
PM Me for any help you need with recording systems/tips
Quote by BrianApocalypse
Good call

Man, you should be a mod, you know everything.

#15
Oh no. I really have no limit. I got around $7 million in inheritance from my great grandfather so please recommend the best stuff money can buy!
#17
Call up Sweetwater and ask for the "Pro Tools Dream Package"

It's around $100k, should get you set for the long run
#18
Quote by Ghost901
Oh no. I really have no limit. I got around $7 million in inheritance from my great grandfather so please recommend the best stuff money can buy!

Please tell me that you are joking. The saying that almost every respected engineer that I know adheres to is, "If you have to ask how to spend it, you shouldn't be spending," when it comes to fairly large sums of money. Even the very few honest says reps I know will admit this. Obviously beginners may need to ask, as they have spend no time at all in the given field, and thus can be unsure of their purchases. Besides with normal beginners we are dealing with $100-500 money amounts and thus even if they buy something that is terrible at least they haven't spent a considerable sum of money.

Ok if you aren't joking here is what I would do. Spend about 2-4K$: get a decent interface, some good mics, some monitors, some treatment and maybe some preamps. The fact of the matter is, is that you have no idea how to get the most out of all this new gear, and thus to spend gobs of money would just be pearls before swine and would not even benefit your overall audio quality much at all.

The rest of money? Invest it wisely. Then in 10 years when you know your recording equipment like the back of your hand, you might have 30 million $, and you will know exactly what you want to spend it on.

If you want there was a post over at the Harmony Central forums where a guy asked how to spend 100,000+$ on gear and he pretty much got a similar response the one I just posted. If you want you can go look it up.
PM Me for any help you need with recording systems/tips
Quote by BrianApocalypse
Good call

Man, you should be a mod, you know everything.

#19
Quote by moody07747

As for an interface, the USB units like the Line6 Toneport GX or UX1

Really? I bought one of these and it sounds soooo bad. The quality is terrible for recording instruments. Is there any fix to improve the quality? Also, I had a lot of latency when recording more than one track. Is there any way to increase that so I can have both rhythm, lead, and vocals recorded in time?
#20
Hehe, I remember that thread. He mistakenly put $100000k at first and people where ****ting bricks over 10 million

But yes, back to the matter at hand.

Definitely don't go out and buy everything you can afford, theres no need for it. Chances are you won't know how to use it anyways.

Get some good preamps as your main, go-to ones. I'd be happy to suggest some options if you PM me, don't feel like writing it all here at 11 PM. Unless your micing drums regularly, a good dual channel preamp, or 2 single channel units should do you good justice for guitars, basses, vocals, and everything else.

Pick up a good interface. One of the ProTools LE packages would be suitable, the MOTU 896HD has also served me very well with alot of routing options, and preamps that sound very nice for the price.

Get some good mics. 1 or 2 main LDCs with drastically different flavors, for different uses. A pair or 2 of matched stereo SDC for overheads on drums, acoustic guitars, vocal ensembles, other acoustic instruments etc. Stock up on a few SM57s as well, they always come in handy.

Good monitors. Many options here, you have the money to get most quality pieces.

Depending on if you have a dedicated "studio" room, treatment is a good way to go. No sense buying quality monitors if there frequency response is ruined by your acoustics. At the least, slap a few panels in appropriate places, some bass traps as well.

Good cables obviously. Mic stands, pop filters, etc.

Most importantly, learn how to use it all, and use it effectively. Like Thrice said, no point in having the best of the best if you can't even operate the worst of the worst.

Feel free to PM me for specific gear suggestions, I'd be happy to help.
#21
Quote by motokid9
Really? I bought one of these and it sounds soooo bad. The quality is terrible for recording instruments. Is there any fix to improve the quality? Also, I had a lot of latency when recording more than one track. Is there any way to increase that so I can have both rhythm, lead, and vocals recorded in time?


well now that I've tried one myself for a while I can say I didn't like Gearbox much but the interface itself wasn't bad at all (when it was working for me...)

I never stated it was a top notch great interface, i suggested he get it now if he was on a limited budget and then upgrade later.

Adjust your buffers and make sure your PC is using a 2.0USB port as well has has at least the min. requirements stated at the line6 site to run the toneport smoothly.

As I said, Gearbox wasnt all that great but you can bypass it with the button next to the tuner button and use your own FX pedals between the interface and guitar.

if you are getting bad recordings I wouldnt blame it on the Toneport, its most likley that you dont know enough about recording, mixing, and mastering to get all you can out of your new gear. It takes a lot more than great gear to get great sounds.
Last edited by moody07747 at Feb 5, 2008,