#1
can someone give me a tab of the locrian mode please? ive heard its a good scale to right evil sounding music on..thanks in advance

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#2
Locrian is based on the leading note. Simple answer, here you go.



e|---------------------------|
b|---------------------------|
G|-------------------2--4----|
D|----------2-3-5------------|
A|--2-3-5--------------------|
E|---------------------------|

B Locrian - 1 octave


The long confusing answer is here. Link

If you've learnt you're Major scales they're easy to remember because you go from Major7th to Major7th and that is the mode.
Last edited by Chris_Sleeps at Feb 2, 2008,
#3
thank you will try that when i next try make a song

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#4
Quote by metallicafan616
thank you will try that when i next try make a song


Modes aren't box shapes. Read the theory sticky and learn the theory behind diatonic harmony and the major scale before moving on to modes. You aren't ready for them yet. Locrian is particular is damn near impossible to establish any sort of tonality with because of it's diminished tonic chord. The tab that was posted above is C major without any context. It can be any one of seven modes.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#5
^ Agreed. Locrian is basically impossible to base a song around. You'd only really use it in jazz over a m7b5 chord. If you're looking for evil, mess around with Phrygian with some chromatic b5 tones thrown in. While very similar to the Locrian mode (note wise, not sound wise), the Phrygian scale can resolve nicely to a minor (or power) chord, rather than Locrian's diminished chord. Adding the chromatic b5s will bring out that evil, diminished sound, while the natural 5s of the Phrygian scale will provide nice resolution.

And do read the FAQ.
#7
The problem you'll find with Locrian, is the semitone between the tonic and supertonic. You'll catch yourself using the tonic as the leading tone to your supertonic...It's a counter-intuitive mode, just like 11/8 is a counter-intuitive time signature.
#9
Quote by 5/4
The problem you'll find with Locrian, is the semitone between the tonic and supertonic. You'll catch yourself using the tonic as the leading tone to your supertonic...It's a counter-intuitive mode, just like 11/8 is a counter-intuitive time signature.


Wouldnt this happen with phrygian becoming lydian aswell?

Also one could just use a locrian (nat 2), to avoid this.
#10
Quote by isaac_bandits
Wouldnt this happen with phrygian becoming lydian aswell?
Em F vs. Bdim C...The first sounds fine resolving to Em while the second wants to go to C.
#11
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Em F vs. Bdim C...The first sounds fine resolving to Em while the second wants to go to C.


After playing that it makes sense. The other guy just stated it as if only the roots locations to eachother was important, while really the tonality is important.

One could play locrian (nat2) and it would lose the pull towards the ionian, as there would no longer be the ionian mode built of its second degree, but then it would probably pull towards a different mode.
#12
Quote by isaac_bandits
After playing that it makes sense. The other guy just stated it as if only the roots locations to eachother was important, while really the tonality is important.

One could play locrian (nat2) and it would lose the pull towards the ionian, as there would no longer be the ionian mode built of its second degree, but then it would probably pull towards a different mode.


I love locrian natural second, but it has the same problem with pulling towards the a relative mode. Neither of them are really suitable for building a song around, but it can sound quite good over a passing m7b5 chord. The only time I ever use locrian is as a way to shift a major key up a half step in a pitch axis progression, to give the song a bit of movement.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#13
Quote by Archeo Avis
The only time I ever use locrian is as a way to shift a major key up a half step in a pitch axis progression, to give the song a bit of movement.


So to do this, you would move the pitch axis from say Cmaj7, with Ionian, to Cmin7(b5) with Locrian, and then up to Dbmaj7 with Ionian.

Is that correct?
#14
Quote by isaac_bandits
So to do this, you would move the pitch axis from say Cmaj7, with Ionian, to Cmin7(b5) with Locrian, and then up to Dbmaj7 with Ionian.

Is that correct?


Exactly. It's not a progression I'd build an entire song out of, since pitch axis progressions don't "develop" as nicely as diatonic ones, but I like using pitch axis to make subtle shifts in the mood of the song . I'll usually create subtle ambiguities in the progression that give me some freedom to alter notes as I please (e.g. failing to specify the fourth for a few bars in a major progression, giving me the freedom to use a natural 4 or a #4 depending on how I feel)
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#15
well, I kinda wrote a song around the Locrian mode (it's in my profile) I didn't really go anywhere with it though, It seems like a nice riff to throw in a song, but by itself it ain't a whole lot. (especially by your standards Arch)
#16
why does evryone say locrian mode is hard? i find it real easy to write "soft music"

although on the downside making metal riffs has been quite hard