#1
So I have been told that you shouldn't base a chord progression around a mode. So I was wondering what is a good way to get phrygian tonality if you can't base a chord progression around it.
#3
Says who? The only reason you "can't" base a chord progression around a scale is because the key signature would show the Ionian (root or I). However, it would still be in that mode. Kind of like songs in minor keys (which is just another mode). A song in D Minor would have an F key signature. Likewise, a song in A Phrygian would also have an F key signature.
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#4
The reason why chord progressions are rare in modal music is that, in general, when you start stringing chords together, they have a tendency to want to resolve to the I or its relative minor (iv).

If you wanted to establish that Phrygian modality, you could either drone a minor chord for a while, or you could drone a susb9 chord (Gsusb9 = G-C-F-Ab). That is the usual way of playing modal music.

I would suggest reading through this website:
http://www.torvund.net/guitar/index.php?page=prog_main
#5
I was also recommended not to base a chord progression around a mode. Because it "limits your harmonic possibilities" or something.

Starting and ending a four chord progression with the root note of the mode sort of engrains it into the listener's ear. That's one way to start building progressions.
#6
You read something Archeo Avis said. He doesn't mean that you shouldn't base chord progressions around modes at all. He means that modal progressions are often simple to avoid wanting to resolve to the parent chord (E Phrygian ----> C major chord).

For Phrygian, do something like Em F G (or whatever key you want) and mess around from there.
#7
With phrygian in particular, you should emphasise the VII sometime around when you use the flat II. I personally feel this really helps bring out the sound of the phrygian mode and keeps it glued to the root note you want.
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#9
Exactly.
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Mastering your instrument is being able to play whatever you hear in your head, unhindered by inadequate technique. After that, it's all about what you've got to say, so there would be no "best," just a bunch of people saying exactly what they mean.
#10
I don't believe there is any reason to not bas a chord progression around a mode. where things can get tricky (and sometimes boring) is when you based an entire song around a mode that isn't Ionian or Aeolian (major and minor keys), because modes really don't open up a lot of options for changing things around that can sound different enough (to my ears) to make things interesting. O good technique to get in the practice of is using a simple modal progression placed somewhere in a more traditional three or four chord progression. Doing this adds spice to the whole of the song, and you don't have to worry too much about figuring out how to keep the chords underlying your modal melody interesting (for example, take a normal, say, E natural minor progression, like Em-D-C, which is simple progression that everyone has probably used at some point in their lives. After a couple rounds of that, throw in G-F-E, and use simple root-five-root power chords, so the thirds won't complicate the rhythm too much and will give you more freedom to noodle over it.)

Hope I'm not too wrong about anything, and I hope this helps!
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#11
Quote by MadassAlex
With phrygian in particular, you should emphasise the VII sometime around when you use the flat II. I personally feel this really helps bring out the sound of the phrygian mode and keeps it glued to the root note you want.

So basically if I stress the intervals unique to the that mode and avoid the chord associated with the Ionian mode I can get A good feel for the mode I want. After trying this progression I can really get that phrygian feel. Thanks for the help everyone.
#12
You don't necessarily have to avoid the Ionian chord. What I would suggest is to avoid a V-I cadence to the Ionian chord. For example, playing a D Dorian progression Dm F C Em still resolves to Dm even though you have the Ionian chord in the progression (and a plagal (IV-I) cadence to it!)
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