#1
I've been playing guitar for a little bit over a month and I've come to the realization that I can't find any notes on the fret board when I'm asked to (currently I'm in Standard Tuning). Would anyone mind telling me how to locate everthing?

First though, let me see if this is right:

E| E, F, F#, G, G#, A, A#, B, B#, C, C#, D, D#, E
A| A, A#, B, B#, C, C#, D, D#, E, F, F#, G, G#, A
D| etc...
G| etc...
B| etc...
E| etc...


A quick side question, if it is okay to ask... I was reading a Theory Lesson online and they were talking about Period Phrases and Comma Phrases. Now, I understand the meanings of both of these but how can you have a solo with a "paragraph (multiple period clauses)" of information without calling it multiple solo's...
#4
Quote by a2ndSide
I've been playing guitar for a little bit over a month and I've come to the realization that I can't find any notes on the fret board when I'm asked to (currently I'm in Standard Tuning). Would anyone mind telling me how to locate everthing?

First though, let me see if this is right:

E| E, F, F#, G, G#, A, A#, B, B#, C, C#, D, D#, E
A| A, A#, B, B#, C, C#, D, D#, E, F, F#, G, G#, A
D| etc...
G| etc...
B| etc...
E| etc...


A quick side question, if it is okay to ask... I was reading a Theory Lesson online and they were talking about Period Phrases and Comma Phrases. Now, I understand the meanings of both of these but how can you have a solo with a "paragraph (multiple period clauses)" of information without calling it multiple solo's...


B-C and E-F are naturally 1/2 step apart (1 fret) so no E# and B#


notes on the neck
#7
Learn all of the natural notes first, then the #'s and b's seem more logical. You're just filling in the blanks.

Know that all notes at the 12th fret are the same as that string played open.

All notes on the low E string are the same notes names as the notes on the high E string.

Learn octaves. These are some things that worked for me. Keep it as simple as possible.
#8
do it like this....

There's only 12 notes on the guitar, they just keep repeating...it's only difficult if you don't take the time to break it down.

Here...

1 - learn the open strings...E, A, D, G, B, E
2 - familiarise yourself with the pattern of intervals along the open string, you don't even need to learn it by heart yet, just have it for reference.

3 - realise that the 12 fret is the octave of the open string, and therefore the same note.
4 - realise that the pattern of intervals is constant, so 12 th fret onwards is identical to open string onwards.

... as far as working out notes goes you are currently never more than 6 frets away from a reference note. However, counting along 6 frets is kind of clunky and not particularly easy, but it's a start.

5 - learn the notes that correspond to the next open string, so 5th fret on the E, A, D and B strings, 4th fret on the G

...all of a sudden you're never more than 3 frets way from a known reference note. All of a sudden working out the notes you don't know became a lot easier...almost twice as easy, in fact.

6 - locate the other octaves of the open notes, first the ones on the next string... 7th fret on the A, D, G and high E strings, 8th fret on the B string. Then the octaves two strings away so 2nd fret on the D and G strings, 3rd fret on the B and top E.

7 - in the same way, locate the octaves of the notes you learned in step 5

...all of a sudden you're now never more than 1 fret away from a known reference note!

Trying to learn them all at once is incredibly daunting, but if you can break it down and at spend a little time working out the notes an gradually building on your previous knowledge you'll have it down in no time.
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#9
Another little trick to add to Steven Seagull's awesome post is to learn the C major scale all over the neck. Play it one on string, one note per string, every single combination you can think of, but while you play it, sing out the note you are playing trying to memorize what the note sounds like, where it is and what it's called. That helped me a lot as well as the breaking down into sections.