#1
*WARNING...noob question follows*

What is the point of having a reverse headstock on a guitar?
"Music is an expression. Not competition." ~ Woe, Is Me

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ESP LTD Viper 400

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#2
Looks, and thats it. Contrary to popular belief, it has no effect on string tension or intonation, as the string contact points (nut and bridge) are the same as on a normal headstock guitar.
#4
Well it's just for the guitar look. Some are cool (Jacksons, ESPs,) some of them are terribly ugly (Fender, Ibanez)
#7
Just cuz, looks, thats it.
They look OK on ESPs, Jacksons, (sometimes) Ibanez, and i like the Firebirds or whatever theyre called.

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#8
Personally I like the look of reverse headstocks in most cases, Strats, Ibanez. Still IMO it has a purpose as it makes more sense for tuning, because of the direction you turn and what is sharp and what is flat. They'd be harder to restring though.
#9
For looks.
I personally hate them because I have to like, twist my wrist all weird when tuning.
So I just got a jackson with a normal headstock.
Tuning is now so easy. haha.
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#10
Quote by metalgirl0
Well it's just for the guitar look. Some are cool (Jacksons, ESPs,) some of them are terribly ugly (Fender, Ibanez)


Oh ok...well I had noticed reverse headstock guitars when my friend bought a reverse headstock Fender (he's a little Jimi obsessed like Two-headedboy mentioned some people were), but I really started thinking about why this occured because I looked at the new Ibanez Iceman ICT700...

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Ibanez-ICT700-Electric-Guitar?sku=515774
"Music is an expression. Not competition." ~ Woe, Is Me

Guitar
ESP LTD Viper 400

Amp
Orange Crush 35LDX
#12
Quote by RPGoof
Wow, the iceman looks really, really good with the reverse headstock. the whole guitar flows nicely.


+1...I'm thinking about making it my 2nd guitar after my Epi LP Standard. The DiMarzio D Activator pickups sound awesome too, at least when basing my judgement on the YouTube Guitar World demo.
"Music is an expression. Not competition." ~ Woe, Is Me

Guitar
ESP LTD Viper 400

Amp
Orange Crush 35LDX
#13
Rumor has it that if you put a reverse headstock on a neck heavy guitar, then the neck will go up instead of dipping down.
Heads will roll. Throats will be slit. Blood will flow like springs of water.
#14
Quote by mafropetee
Rumor has it that if you put a reverse headstock on a neck heavy guitar, then the neck will go up instead of dipping down.



And... how would that work, the tuners being even closer to the ground? >_> I know for one thing 12-String acoustics are neck-heavy as heck, but those are 6-a-side.
#15
Quote by CJRocker
Looks, and thats it. Contrary to popular belief, it has no effect on string tension or intonation, as the string contact points (nut and bridge) are the same as on a normal headstock guitar.
That's not strictly true, from the natural side of things. The "tension" of a string - which manifests in, for example, how hard it is to bend a string - is related to the whole length of the string in the system, not just the nut-to-bridge length. Longer string tuned to the same note has more tension in it than a shorter string. So, reverse headstock makes the bass side a bit more tense than a normal headstock - you might notice it, or you might not... That obviously doesn't apply to locking nuts.
Fender Japan Stratocaster Ibanez Pro540 Power Ibanez Pro540 Saber Ibanez 430S Ibanez S540 Charvel LSXIII w/GraphTech Ghost MIDI Parker Fly Artist Ibanez S1220 Mesa F30 Roland GR20 Roland Microcube + IBANEZ TREMS STILL SUCK!
#16
Quote by pifty
That's not strictly true, from the natural side of things. The "tension" of a string - which manifests in, for example, how hard it is to bend a string - is related to the whole length of the string in the system, not just the nut-to-bridge length. Longer string tuned to the same note has more tension in it than a shorter string. So, reverse headstock makes the bass side a bit more tense than a normal headstock - you might notice it, or you might not... That obviously doesn't apply to locking nuts.

But by that logic, shouldn't all headstocks have the same effect on tension? And likewise shouldn't the location of string ferrules affect it? They don't. You can have anything between the string contact point you want, and it won't affect it, as its dictated by the contact points and the scale length. Hence why when you see a measurement on a box of strings for tension, you don't see a "Reverse Headstock" column.
#17
Quote by Habit Zero
And... how would that work, the tuners being even closer to the ground? >_> I know for one thing 12-String acoustics are neck-heavy as heck, but those are 6-a-side.


... you don't actually think I was being serious, did you?
Heads will roll. Throats will be slit. Blood will flow like springs of water.
#18
Quote by CJRocker
But by that logic, shouldn't all headstocks have the same effect on tension?
They do. 3x3 headstocks have it all more or less balanced, inline headstocks put emphasis on one side.

Quote by CJRocker
And likewise shouldn't the location of string ferrules affect it? They don't.
They do too. Albeit fairly insignificantly. Read on.

Quote by CJRocker
You can have anything between the string contact point you want, and it won't affect it, as its dictated by the contact points and the scale length.
Granted that you can tell the laws of physics to sit down and shut up, then yes. Otherwise, not really, and the total length of a string will still affect the perceived stiffness. There are easy and intuitive experiments to prove that. If you want to temp as your own guinea pig, put a .042 as the first and the sixth string on an inline headstock and play around. I'm guessing you'll notice the difference if you notice the difference between a set of 10s and 9s.

The principle is that when you bend a string to get a higher note, you're stretching the whole string, not just the scale length. With a longer string, you have more to stretch to attain the tension within the scale length to go up to the same note. More material, more resistance, more force needed to overcome it, thus the proverbial stiffer feel. That's the best I can explain it without drawing up free body diagrams

Quote by CJRocker
Hence why when you see a measurement on a box of strings for tension, you don't see a "Reverse Headstock" column.
Neither do you see a separate column for all the scale lengths. It's an arbitrary measure, that won't really make a good argument if you want to sue them over the string not pulling the advertised value on your instrument.
Fender Japan Stratocaster Ibanez Pro540 Power Ibanez Pro540 Saber Ibanez 430S Ibanez S540 Charvel LSXIII w/GraphTech Ghost MIDI Parker Fly Artist Ibanez S1220 Mesa F30 Roland GR20 Roland Microcube + IBANEZ TREMS STILL SUCK!
#19
Quote by Thebiz
Oh ok...well I had noticed reverse headstock guitars when my friend bought a reverse headstock Fender (he's a little Jimi obsessed like Two-headedboy mentioned some people were), but I really started thinking about why this occured because I looked at the new Ibanez Iceman ICT700...

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Ibanez-ICT700-Electric-Guitar?sku=515774


Ibanez just did that to further piss all over their non-shredder fanbase, for reasons unbeknownst to me.

Piss and shit on the lot of them, I say.
#20
Hockey stick headstocks are so ****ING SEXY.
bree bree look how fucking metal i am
#21
Quote by CJRocker
But by that logic, shouldn't all headstocks have the same effect on tension? And likewise shouldn't the location of string ferrules affect it? They don't. You can have anything between the string contact point you want, and it won't affect it, as its dictated by the contact points and the scale length. Hence why when you see a measurement on a box of strings for tension, you don't see a "Reverse Headstock" column.

I know all of pifty's ramblings explained it pretty well (the "stretching the whole string" bit), but if you want an extremely basic shooting-fish-in-a-barrel example, then imagine you're suspending a length of steel wire between two poles that are app. a hundred feet apart. Underneath the wire you put two sawhorses that are tall enough to have the wire resting upon them. The sawhorses should be app. five feet apart. Then pull down on the wire between the sawhorses. Easy. Plenty of yield.

Then suspend the wire between two poles that are ten feet apart, and put the sawhorses under the wire, still five feet apart. And make sure the wire is tightened to the same tension as before. Pull down on the wire again. What do you experience?
#22
I find quite the opposite I think it lets the lower strings ring out more and gives more sustain to the guitar. I personally like them because it feels more natural to tune.
#23
Quote by fishingnickrules
I find quite the opposite I think it lets the lower strings ring out more and gives more sustain to the guitar. I personally like them because it feels more natural to tune.

Not only has that been proven to be bogus, this thread is 8 years old.
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