#1
Ok ive learned how to create and play all the 7 modes, the natural, harmonic, Melodic minor scales, and the 5 pentotonic scales
Now how do i use them?
How do i improvise using them and move up the fretboard while playing them?
For example, the guitar player in my band can improv a solo down the fretboard. How is this acheived using the scales?

Thanks for any help
SHE walks in beauty, like the night
Of cloudless climes and starry skies;
And all that's best of dark and bright
Meet in her aspect and her eyes:
Thus mellow'd to that tender light
Which heaven to gaudy day denies.
Last edited by nudge at Feb 2, 2008,
#2
musican talk would be the place for this. i would say lots of practice. but MT is the place for this. take it there
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Viscara (my band)
#3
Quote by Mr.Cuddles
musican talk would be the place for this. i would say lots of practice. but MT is the place for this. take it there

ok illtake a look there
SHE walks in beauty, like the night
Of cloudless climes and starry skies;
And all that's best of dark and bright
Meet in her aspect and her eyes:
Thus mellow'd to that tender light
Which heaven to gaudy day denies.
#4
There are rules to this, but it is up to you to create your own improvisation. The rules are only guidelines, but now you have the tools, so you just need to figure out what sounds good.

Some basic tips:
The (minor) pentatonic can work over pretty much anything rock, it just sounds really generic and cliche.

The major pentatonic can work over major rock and blues chord progressions for a souther rock kind of sound.

The blues scale is your best bet for blues, obviously.

Blend all three of these in major chord rock and blues and this will give you plenty to improv with if you are just starting out.

Modes are a bit more complicated, and I really don't use them much, so I'm not sure how much help I can be on this.

The major scale, or locrian mode, I belive it's called, can be used when ever you want a happy, do re mi kind of sound. I use the major pentatonic 100 times more than the major scale, because i think it is easier to work with and sounds better, but they contain the same notes, so you can mess around with both.

The 2nd mode, or Dorian mode, is a minor mode, and works best over any kind of minor dominant chord. If you've got any of those, throw some Dorian mode in there for some tasty jazz licks.

The 5th mode, or Mixolyidan mode, is a major mode, and works with any dominant chords that aren't minor. This will give you the same jazzy feel of the Dorian mode, without the minor sound.

The 6th mode, Aeolian mode, or natural minor scale, can be used over any minor chords. It can be used to create a variety of sounds, and I find this to be a very fun scale to work with.

The harmonic minor, or the natural minor with a natural 7th, is usually used in the V - i cadience in a minor key, because the major 3rd of that major V chord is the note that makes the harmonic minor scale the harmonic minor scale. I don't use this scale very often on guitar, only in my classical compositions for ensembles. If you use this scale for stuff other than that cadience, you will get a haunting, creepy, almost middle eastern kind of sound. Mess around with it and see what you like.

The melodic minor is really pointless in my opinion, and I never use it, but I guess it is almost like a combination of the harmonic and natural minor scales.

The other modes you won't be using very often unless you get into very advanced music, I don't use them on guitar, but I only really play blues.

I hope that helps, if I'm wrong on anything (I'm mostly self taught), someone can correct me.

"Blues is what you got when everything else is
gone." - J.Lansdowne
#5
thanks for that post GD_GC. It helped me know what each of the scales are like.
But how do i make my own solos/riffs out of the scales. DO i just pul out random notes? or is there a special formula?

Also i see u went to laot of effort to write all that out
Thanks again
SHE walks in beauty, like the night
Of cloudless climes and starry skies;
And all that's best of dark and bright
Meet in her aspect and her eyes:
Thus mellow'd to that tender light
Which heaven to gaudy day denies.
Last edited by nudge at Feb 2, 2008,
#6
There isn't a formula, you just have to play around with the different notes and see what you like. You can always add in bends/slides/hammer ons/ etc to add effect, too.
"Blues is what you got when everything else is
gone." - J.Lansdowne
#7
Quote by GD_GC
There isn't a formula, you just have to play around with the different notes and see what you like. You can always add in bends/slides/hammer ons/ etc to add effect, too.


OK thanks for all your help
I do have a couple of questions though
1. Can u start playing the scale in 1 postion on the fretboard and continue it somewhere else?
2. Can u use multiple scales in 1 songs?

Thanks
SHE walks in beauty, like the night
Of cloudless climes and starry skies;
And all that's best of dark and bright
Meet in her aspect and her eyes:
Thus mellow'd to that tender light
Which heaven to gaudy day denies.
#8
bump
SHE walks in beauty, like the night
Of cloudless climes and starry skies;
And all that's best of dark and bright
Meet in her aspect and her eyes:
Thus mellow'd to that tender light
Which heaven to gaudy day denies.
#9
Something tells me you just learned the box formations of all these scales, and not the patterns or theory behind any of them since you're confused as to how to play it up and down the neck. Provided you can move the box up or down, but that will either change the key or make it major or minor.
#10
Quote by Vale_Deo
Something tells me you just learned the box formations of all these scales, and not the patterns or theory behind any of them since you're confused as to how to play it up and down the neck. Provided you can move the box up or down, but that will either change the key or make it major or minor.


Ive learned how to construct the scales, and im not sure what u mean by patterns. My teacher was teaching just beofre the holidays (about 2 montsh ago) so im jjust picking it up now. and i dont rly know the fretboard that well -_-
SHE walks in beauty, like the night
Of cloudless climes and starry skies;
And all that's best of dark and bright
Meet in her aspect and her eyes:
Thus mellow'd to that tender light
Which heaven to gaudy day denies.
#11
u can walys play scales an octave higher.

eg u can play A minor pent. ACDEG 5th fret at the 17th fret which is 1 octave higher
#12
Quote by jimzer
u can walys play scales an octave higher.

eg u can play A minor pent. ACDEG 5th fret at the 17th fret which is 1 octave higher


Ok cool
SO does it have to be in the same key when u transpose it over?
SHE walks in beauty, like the night
Of cloudless climes and starry skies;
And all that's best of dark and bright
Meet in her aspect and her eyes:
Thus mellow'd to that tender light
Which heaven to gaudy day denies.
#13
Yes you have to stay in the same key. If you are playing anything pentatonic, you want to stay in that same pentatonic throughout the chord progression. But if you are using modes, you want to switch modes when you switch chords. For example if the chord progression when A7, D7, E7, you would use the A mixolydian, D mixolydian, and then the E mixolydian every time you had each of those chords. I hope that helps.
"Blues is what you got when everything else is
gone." - J.Lansdowne
#14
Quote by GD_GC
Yes you have to stay in the same key. If you are playing anything pentatonic, you want to stay in that same pentatonic throughout the chord progression. But if you are using modes, you want to switch modes when you switch chords. For example if the chord progression when A7, D7, E7, you would use the A mixolydian, D mixolydian, and then the E mixolydian every time you had each of those chords. I hope that helps.


Thanks for that
SHE walks in beauty, like the night
Of cloudless climes and starry skies;
And all that's best of dark and bright
Meet in her aspect and her eyes:
Thus mellow'd to that tender light
Which heaven to gaudy day denies.