#1
How should i go about learning how to use the major and minor scale for lead are there any excercises or anything?

So basically what should i practice with it?
Quote by Mackawade
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#2
my guitar teacher gave me a blues jam cd which had some basic blues riffs in minor and major keys, and told me to jam with the scales with it. it helped me get to know the scales and to develop my improvising skills so find some songs or riffs that you know the key to and play with scales to them.

if you don't have any you know the key to or are to complex, then yeah this won't help much sorry.
#3
play them
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#4
Quote by Rokeman
my guitar teacher gave me a blues jam cd which had some basic blues riffs in minor and major keys, and told me to jam with the scales with it. it helped me get to know the scales and to develop my improvising skills so find some songs or riffs that you know the key to and play with scales to them.

if you don't have any you know the key to or are to complex, then yeah this won't help much sorry.


ok thanks so just experiment with them on backing tracks


spider so wut i just run up and down them mindlessly?
Quote by Mackawade
i was wondering what is some of the stuff you guys would consider better than WOW


Quote by last-1s-out
Getting kicked in the balls repeatedly


Primus Sucks
#5
Quote by Bobsam3
ok thanks so just experiment with them on backing tracks


spider so wut i just run up and down them mindlessly?


i use to do stuff mindlessly, just to get the feel of where the notes are, but yeah, it get's boring, and discovering i could improvise was one of the best things that happened in my guitar playing.

do you have any backing tracks you can use?
#6
ummm kinda like i could record myself and play over it and i have a couple of blues backing tracks which might work.
Quote by Mackawade
i was wondering what is some of the stuff you guys would consider better than WOW


Quote by last-1s-out
Getting kicked in the balls repeatedly


Primus Sucks
#7
Quote by Bobsam3
ummm kinda like i could record myself and play over it and i have a couple of blues backing tracks which might work.


ok cool. you might have to learn about keys to record yourself and play scales to it though.
#8
Quote by Rokeman
ok cool. you might have to learn about keys to record yourself and play scales to it though.


Ya i know a bit of theory would some thing like A5, C5, G5 progression work for soloing with the minor scale and major scale right?
Quote by Mackawade
i was wondering what is some of the stuff you guys would consider better than WOW


Quote by last-1s-out
Getting kicked in the balls repeatedly


Primus Sucks
#9
yeah depends what scales you're playing with what chords. that A5 C5 G5 progression will work with A minor and C major scales.

to practice E minor and G major scales play a chord progression like... G major, D major, C major [C for 2 bars] (which is the chords for "knockin' on heavens door". i just taught you a whole song )

i should clarify, Knockin' on Heavens Door is in G major, the G major scale is the same as the E minor scale but starts on G. you probably already knew that. i just got out of school for today, which is why i'm being really educational right now hope this helps instead of being confusing!
#10
Play them up and down. Play them in reverse. Play them in a stepping pattern (up 2 notes, down 1, for example). Play them randomly. Play them along to a song. Play them. Play them. Play them.
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#12
One thing I found is that playing lead takes speed. Even the slowest players are actually playing faster than you think and it takes dextarity.

I am not talking "shred" speeds, just building up speed to the point of the notes becoming fluid and not mechanical sounding. So practice the scales until you can move up and down fluidly without it sounding mechanical.

From there, I think it depends on your goals, what genre of music you like, and where you want to be in "x" amount of time. Answering these questions will determine how much theory you need and if you want to be a guitarist or a musician.

Chris