#1
Hello,
Lately it has occured to me after reading different things and watching different videos, that one of the best ways to make solos is to arpeggiate the chords that the rythm is playing. The reason i want to do it this way versus a box shape is because it gives more freedom and my favorite player(Marty Friedman) uses this technique and i love his solos. However, im not exactly sure how this works, but ill give it a shot. If say the rythm is E min, D Maj, A maj, E min, then i play the notes of a the E minor chord, then the notes of the D maj, then the a A maj ect. Correct? I know that you have to make your changes on time I.e. as soon as the E min chord switches i play the notes of the D maj. My next question is, is how do i arpeggiate these chords all over the neck? When the E min chord is playing can i play the notes of a E min barre chord based on the A string at the 7th fret seperatly? (sweep it for example) I think that is how you do it, but how do i use hammer on's and pull off's using this method? If i can only play the notes of that scale then hammering and pulling would be using different notes wouldent it?
Thank you.
Schecter Blackjack
Mesa F-30
Line 6 Verbzilla
Bad Monkey
FAB Chorus
#2
You add notes from outside the notes of the chord to colour the solo, and make it more 'interesting'. One thing Friedman does is use passing tones - notes from outside the scale - to great effect, by using them with a certain technique, ie a quick hammer-on/pull off series.

To master this you need to know what notes are in the chord, and what notes aren't, and which passing notes will sound good, and most importantly, how to use passing tones which sound tonaly bad to great effect. Thats what makes a great solo. The technique you use to bring the passing tone out is up to you.
#3
Thanks a ton, this helps me out a lot.
Schecter Blackjack
Mesa F-30
Line 6 Verbzilla
Bad Monkey
FAB Chorus
#4
A good way to practise this sort of thing is to take a backing track, which you know the key of, and you know what scale to jam with. Then find the most horribly outragous sounding note you can that is from outside the scale. Work on getting that note to fit in with your jamming. If you can learn to do this, you'll have the confidence to solo well, since you know that whatever note you land on, you can make it sound good
#5
My next question is, is how do i arpeggiate these chords all over the neck?
If say the rythm is E min, D Maj, A maj, E min, then i play the notes of a the E minor chord, then the notes of the D maj, then the a A maj ect. Correct?
You answered your own question! Play the notes of the chord anywhere on the fretboard and you are arpeggiating the chord. You don't even have to use chord shapes, for example with Em you could play E and G on the same string and still be arpeggiating the chord.

This requires that you know the notes all over the fretboard, and the notes that are in each chord.

EDIT: Seeing as you're a Marty fan, I assumed you have seen 'Melodic Control'. If not, you can see it on google videos.
My name is Andy
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