#1
I know how to find out what notes are in a major scale, and how to add the major and minor tags to get the basic chords that are in a key, for example the C major chords of Cmaj,Dmin,Emin,Fmaj,Gmaj,Amin,Bdim. My question is, how do I know what 7th, 9th, Suspended, add, ect chords will also fit into that key? I appreciate and help a lot Thanks.
#2
all those chords fit into keys. for example, if you're doing seven chords, it would be

maj7,min7,min7,maj7,maj7,min7,min7b5. Apply that to any key. You just apply the formula to which ever chord. Although a sus minor chord wouldn't really work.
#3
Quote by J.T.W
I know how to find out what notes are in a major scale, and how to add the major and minor tags to get the basic chords that are in a key, for example the C major chords of Cmaj,Dmin,Emin,Fmaj,Gmaj,Amin,Bdim. My question is, how do I know what 7th, 9th, Suspended, add, ect chords will also fit into that key? I appreciate and help a lot Thanks.

When thinking about chords in a certain key I like to relate the intervals of the relative modes to figure out the chords. The major scale in the key of C goes C Ionian D dorian E phrygian F lydian G mixolydian A Aeolian B locrian. So if you look at the intervals of the modes say dorian for example is 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 so you could play a Dm 7, D sus 4, D sus 2 etc. in the above progression because it includes those intervals.
#4
Thanks spam that makes a lot of sense .
I don't quite get your method though SOAD, but that might be because I'm not entirely familiar with modes yet, and I don't understand how you got a sus 4 or sus 2 from the dorian modes intervals, over my head I guess, thanks anyway .
#5
He's not asking about modes, but yeah. i'll expand a little bit on what i said.

Take the formula for the chord you want to use. let's use sus4 for this example. The formula for a sus4 chord is R 4 5. So basically, all you do is apply that to a given chord. For example, Gsus would be G C D. You can apply it to minor chords, but it wouldn't really matter because what defines a minor chord as "minor" is the minor 3rd.

Let's do another one. This time the minor 7 chord. The formula for this is R b3 5 b7. So let's apply it to the key of C major. Take the chord A minor. Apply the formula of the minor 7 chord to it. The notes would be A C E G.

I hope that makes sense

edit: glad i could help
#6
Quote by Spamwise
He's not asking about modes, but yeah. i'll expand a little bit on what i said.

Take the formula for the chord you want to use. let's use sus4 for this example. The formula for a sus4 chord is R 4 5. So basically, all you do is apply that to a given chord. For example, Gsus would be G C D. You can apply it to minor chords, but it wouldn't really matter because what defines a minor chord as "minor" is the minor 3rd.

Let's do another one. This time the minor 7 chord. The formula for this is R b3 5 b7. So let's apply it to the key of C major. Take the chord A minor. Apply the formula of the minor 7 chord to it. The notes would be A C E G.

I hope that makes sense

edit: glad i could help

Oh I get that now, so if I were to make an E sus chord it would be E-A-B? and to get the rest of the key I'd just repeat it for the base note, correct?

And if I wanted to get all the major or minor sevenths in a key it would just be with the formula if I understood right? And to determine if they were major or minor I would just use what they would be as a n open chord? And thanks again.
#7
Oh I get that now, so if I were to make an E sus chord it would be E-A-B? and to get the rest of the key I'd just repeat it for the base note, correct?


yep



And if I wanted to get all the major or minor sevenths in a key it would just be with the formula if I understood right? And to determine if they were major or minor I would just use what they would be as a n open chord? And thanks again.

yeah you can do it that way. I think it might be easier in the long run to just memorize the chord order, so that when you were playing in a certain key you would know instantly that the 7 chord of the 6th note is a minor 7 chord.
#8
Alright, thanks, makes a lot more sense now, much appreciated.
#9
Quote by J.T.W
Oh I get that now, so if I were to make an E sus chord it would be E-A-B? and to get the rest of the key I'd just repeat it for the base note, correct?

And if I wanted to get all the major or minor sevenths in a key it would just be with the formula if I understood right? And to determine if they were major or minor I would just use what they would be as a n open chord? And thanks again.

Watch out for the V chord (in the key of C major it would be G) because it doesn't work as a maj7 chord.
#10
Quote by SOAD_freak777
Watch out for the V chord (in the key of C major it would be G) because it doesn't work as a maj7 chord.

What would it work out as then if you don't mind my asking?
#11
that's right, I forgot. It would be a dominant7 chord. The 7th note of a major7 chord built off the 5 note of a scale never fits in with the actual scale (e.g. Gmaj7 in the key of C = G B D F#), so the 7th degree is borrowed from harmonic minor.
#12
Oh, right, because the 5th is the dominant interval, thanks for reminding me SOAD, and Spam :P.

Right, and because of that too.... but I didn't know that one yet.
#13
Quote by KryptNet
I'm not exactly sure what you're asking. I mean as long as we're stacking thirds in a major key, everything is going to be in the key signature. Obviously there a zillion exceptions. I'm probably the one confused here, but maybe I'd be able to offer advice if you can clarify and tell me what you're trying to do/figure out.

Are you talking about non-chord tones(passing/suspensions etc) Or perhaps leading tones in minor? All the stuff about tri-tones?

If not, what you're asking may get into some pretty advanced theory about chord harmony.

Actually, all I was asking was how I would know what 7th, 9th, and other "extended" (As I dub them, don't know how right it is) chords, would be in a key, I hope it's not that complex.

Edit: And I swear that post was there somewhere! Sorry if it was an accidental double post.
#14
^^yup you're right...but after reading the other posts, I figured out what you were asking! And everyone seemed to be answering without my help. So MY FAULT for you double post

Another EDIT:
Quote by Spamwise
that's right, I forgot. It would be a dominant7 chord. The 7th note of a major7 chord built off the 5 note of a scale never fits in with the actual scale (e.g. Gmaj7 in the key of C = G B D F#), so the 7th degree is borrowed from harmonic minor.
That's only in minor, because if you build a chord off the dominant degree(the 5th note) of a maj scale, the chord is going to be dominant. In Cmaj, the intervals for a G7 would be maj-min-min so you would not have any accidentals(like F#) But in Cmin, the dominant would be G-B(natural)-D-F, the B being the leading tone(7th), so it is raised a half step from Bb.

Or for another example, in the relative minor of Cmaj(Amin) the V chord would be E-G#-B-D. Again...maj-min-min so the leading tone G is raised a half step because of the tritone. It's confusing as hell but hope it helps!
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#15
That.... that was incredibly confusing, but I'll just keep working on my studying of it and get it eventually :P. Thanks a lot anyhow, I'll keep it in mind when I get to it.
#16
Watch out for the V chord (in the key of C major it would be G) because it doesn't work as a maj7 chord.


That's the dominant, right? So, that'd be G7?
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#18
He's not asking about modes


Did you read his post? You can use the relative modes of a key to add extensions onto a chord. It's probably the easiest way to learn the chords in a key.
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