#3
You can use Dm7 to G7 to Cmaj7, really common to jazz. Maybe throw in a Bm(b5) to E+9 to Am7. Just anything in the key of C really.
#4
Can you explain these chords, their diatonic relativety, etc. ?
I'm curious, and love to learn.
And it wouldn't hurt to explain it to the TS either (Y).
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#5
Well Dm7 - G7 - CMaj is called a II-V-I progression. The II-V-I progression is one of the most popular chord progressions in jazz. You don't always have to use those chord together however. Often composers will just use a II-V or V-I progression aswell.
#6
Quote by ColdbulleT
Well Dm7 - G7 - CMaj is called a II-V-I progression. The II-V-I progression is one of the most popular chord progressions in jazz. You don't always have to use those chord together however. Often composers will just use a II-V or V-I progression aswell.

V-I is from waaay back, when jazz was still busy developing itself into the way we know it now. Around the same time, the ii-V-I was added, and that sounded more sophisticated. Later on, people tried experimenting with ii-V-i's where the i is the ii of the next chord, going round the circle of fifths! Etc etc.

Anyway, ideas to try:

ii-V-I: Dm7 - G7 - Cmaj7
vi-ii-V-I: Am7 - Dm7 - G7 - Cmaj7
vii*-III-vi: Bm7b5 - E7 - Amin7
ii-V-I-IV-vii*-III-vi - vi: Dmin7 - G7 - Cmaj7 - Fmaj7 - Bm7b5 - E7 - Am7

You can also try some standard things, like replacing any chord in such a progression with it's dominant variant. IE you can make Am7 - Dm7 - G7 - Cmaj7 something like A7 - Dm7 - G7 - Cmaj7. Gives it more pull to the Dm7 and eventually to the Cmaj7. You can also try making it all dominants (except the C chord probably)
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