#1
hi all
i am wondering that is it possible to use these relation in song writing?
for example as c major relative scale is a minor
can i create chord progression in c major scale and put melody over it in a minor scale?
thanks
#2
You could use the notes from the A minor scale over a C major progression, but the tonal centre is C so you would actually still be playing C major.
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#3
can i create chord progression in c major scale and put melody over it in a minor scale?


No. The chord progression determines the tonality. The notes CDEFGAB over a C major progression are C major, regardless of the order in which you play them.
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#4
hi
thanks for your quick replys
two more questions
1-then how do you find which scale to use over which chord progression?
2- how do you know which chords to be after each other to sounds good?
and more over which notes after each other while creating melodys?
matter of rules or just feeling?
in fact 4 questions
Last edited by dimebag1d at Feb 4, 2008,
#5
Quote by dimebag1d
hi prime
thanks for your quick reply
two more questions
1- how do you find which scale to use over which chord progression?
2- how do you know which chords to be after each other to sounds good?
and more over which notes after each other while creating melodys?
matter of rules or just feeling?
in fact 4 questions


The sticky should do a good job of explaining some of the basic concepts. The answers to both of your questions can be very simple or very complicated, depending on the approach you take. You really should focus on learning the theory behind chord and scale construction, because those are the basics that almost everything else builds on. The sticky should cover them. If you have any questions after reading it, just ask.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#6
thanks man
you know i've read some ex.i know that chords are built from triads and intervals between major and minor scales and how they are built
the thing i dont get is how to relate which chords with which one ex. in c major scale
and what notes for melodys?
#7
the thing i dont get is how to relate which chords with which one ex. in c major scale


It can get complicated, especially when dealing with genres like jazz that make heavy use of borrowed and altered chords. Your best bet is to familiarize yourself with the circle of fifths and use the number of sharps/flats in the progression to deduce the key.

and what notes for melodys?


The simple answer is: Use the notes in the key and emphasize chord tones.
In reality, you're not at all limited to chord tones or even notes in the key. In fact, the ultimate goal is to be able to disregard scales altogether and draw only from your knowledge of intervals, but this takes enormous practice and extensive knowledge of theory.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.