#1
If I have a song consisting primarily of D major, G Major, F Major and C Major, is it OK for me to try (albeit ever so carefully) to play pieces of the D, G, F and C major scales over each of those chords respectfully? I am referring to lead guitar in this case.

I'm contrasting that approach with simply playing a single G major scale or another single scale which fits over the progression.
#2
You can try it, and it will work to a certain extent. But personally I feel that you would be better off playing in only one scale (or maybe two scales) that works. This way you can get the implied changes and the different "feels" from the different underlying chords.

But realy whatever suits you.
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#3
In my opinion, it would probably be best to have one main scale in mind, and then use occassional out-of-key notes to emphasise the individual sounds of the chords.
#5
You're on the right track, that can be a good way to play over a progression that isn't diatonic.

Now, when playing modes over chords, look at the intervals making up the chord and the intervals making up the mode. If they match up, they will sound good together.
Say a Cm chord comes up, thats 1 b3 5. Look at the modes and you see that Dorian, Phrygian and Aeolian all contain those intervals.
So you could play C Dorian, C Phrygian or C Aeolian, which one you chose will give a different 'feel'.
Now if an Amaj7 comes along, thats 1 3 5 7. Compare that to the modes and you see that you can play A Ionian or A Lydian, again giving different feels.
What about a Bbm7b5? You see that the only mode with 1 b3 b5 b7 is Locrian, so you can play Bb Locrian
With an E7 (1 3 5 b7) you find that only Mixolydian fits, so you can play E mixolydian

JohnlJones Jazz-Theory Bit:
With that E7 you could play E Phrygian, with the b3 funtioning as a #2, to outline an altered dominant chord.
E7 - 1 3 4 b7
E Phrygian 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
This gives the intervals 1 b2 #2 3 4 5 b6 b7 which is a _11b9#9b13 chord.

Remember none of this is law, it's just a guide so don't be afraid to experiment.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#6
The progression in seems to be a C major progression that makes use of both a natural and a raised 4th. If the progression itself sounds good to you, I'd use a C major scale over the C, G, and F chords, while avoiding or raising the 4th over the D major chord for a lydian sound.

Now, when playing modes over chords, look at the intervals making up the chord and the intervals making up the mode. If they match up, they will sound good together.
Say a Cm chord comes up, thats 1 b3 5. Look at the modes and you see that Dorian, Phrygian and Aeolian all contain those intervals.
So you could play C Dorian, C Phrygian or C Aeolian, which one you chose will give a different 'feel'.
Now if an Amaj7 comes along, thats 1 3 5 7. Compare that to the modes and you see that you can play A Ionian or A Lydian, again giving different feels.
What about a Bbm7b5? You see that the only mode with 1 b3 b5 b7 is Locrian, so you can play Bb Locrian
With an E7 (1 3 5 b7) you find that only Mixolydian fits, so you can play E mixolydian


I would say that if the progression resolves elsewhere, you won't get a modal sound at all. Modal music is generally tailor made for whatever mode the composer is looking to use.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Feb 4, 2008,
#7
Yeah I'm not too happy with that part of my standard response.

If you have Em G D C (a progression I've been jamming with today), using my guide you might decide to play E Aeolian, G Ionian, D Mixolydian and C lydian. But if you do that, you're just playing E minor.

However, if you use E dorian, G mixolydian, D mixolydian and C mixolydian (as I have been doing) it brings out each mode's colour. Basically what I'm doing is just playing out of key. But describing the out of key notes in terms of modes gives a better description of their sound than just 'out of key'.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums