#1
Hi. I've got a Squier Strat and I've been customising it to solve some problems. Now it plays like a beast!

The only issue I have now is that my tremolo bridge looks like it's sticking out too much. I know it normally pokes out a bit, but if it is sticking out too much then it could damage my guitar.

Here is a picture. The quality is ****e so if you need another then tell me!



So, is it sticking out too much or am I just being too panicky?

Thanks for any help!

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#2
what do you mean? I assume you mean the back of the bridge is a lot higher off the body then the front? Well that's not too difficult to fix. You just have to either add more springs inside the trem or tighten them up a bit more.
EH


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#3
There are springs under the back plate, behind the guitar, one end attached to the bridge, the other end is attached to a metal piece with 2 screws that are directly drilled into the body. Tighten the screws until your bridge is COMPLETELY flat on the body. If you tighten the screws all the way and the tremolo still isn't all the way flat against the body of the guitar, then add another spring in the back.

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#4
hmm.. hard one to call. there is no real thing as sticking out too much.
i mean, if you have set it up exactly to float like that then you should know its not a problem... but.. judging on this post... it seems you dont know too much.

but.. to fix it!

either tighten the screws on the tremolo springs claw (behind back plate)
or add another spring (after loosening it enough)


also your action looks insanely high... might want that fixed too. But, since it "plays like a beast" ill leave you to it!

#5
The important question here is this: is it a 6 screw trem or a fulcrum two point? Also, A side view is far more useful, especially if its a 2 point. If its a 2 point, as long as it is parallel to the body, its fine.
#6
Quote by voodoochild13


also your action looks insanely high... might want that fixed too. But, since it "plays like a beast" ill leave you to it!



Yes I admit, I'm not great with guitar modding, but if the action is any lower, then i get intonation problems and it rattles too much :'(

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Sometimes I make people spurt:
Quote by nimrod_hahahaha
sigged for making me spurt guiness on my laptop...damn you!

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#7
Quote by MrDinkleberry
There are springs under the back plate, behind the guitar, one end attached to the bridge, the other end is attached to a metal piece with 2 screws that are directly drilled into the body. Tighten the screws until your bridge is COMPLETELY flat on the body. If you tighten the screws all the way and the tremolo still isn't all the way flat against the body of the guitar, then add another spring in the back.


Right I've done that, and I'm now able to reduce my action slightly as well as the bridge not looking funny anymore!

Yay

Thanks guys!

My Website


Sometimes I make people spurt:
Quote by nimrod_hahahaha
sigged for making me spurt guiness on my laptop...damn you!

Quote by imdeth


Jimmy that was pure awesomeness. WIN!
#8
Much too high above the body, as far as I can judge from this picture.
Adjusting a vintage trem can be done with the two screws as discribed here above by Mrdinckleberry.
To have the bridge plate resting completely flat and firm on the body is an option I too would recommend (not to mention clogging up and hardtailing the SOAB all together) but an option nevertheless. In fact these trems are supposed to be full floating, that is not resting on the body, but hovering slightly above. About one millimeter measured on the edge facing away from the strings will be OK for most players. That way you can bend up as well as down.
Setting up a trem should be done after having chosen string gauche and tuning up to pitch, but before you do any other adjustment. Adjusting the truss rod is OK, but doing the action and intonation is only usefull after having set up the trem.
Also mind that the screws holding the bridge should not be turned tight; only just tight enough to keep it's nose on the ground.