#1
I know that in a typical track-by-track recording situation, you record drums first, then bass, rhythm guitar, lead guitar, and finally vocals.

My drummer isn't around right now, though, and I want to lay down my bass tracks and maybe have my guitarist come over to do his parts, too.

If we record our stuff to a click, is it okay if we do the drums last, or will that impact the overall tightness of the recording?

Thanks.
#3
If your drummer is awesome then it won't be a problem. If he's just OK it will be a pain in the ass. I've recorded a band this way and their drummer was excellent and it was still a headache and took a looooong time.
#4
When recording as a band, we generally do Drums, Bass and rhtyhm guitar in one take. But that's because we play songs live for like 3 months before we record them, not to mention the incredible amount of reheasing involved.

I usually overdub keyboards and lead guitar myself afterwards.
#5
I say just start with the fundamental instrument to the song, and whoever is the tightest. If your drummer is not tight than making him go first might not make sense. But you'll be fine I'm sure. Remember there are no rules to any production.
#6
I have a question and i think it would fit in this thread, besides its not good enough for its own thread.

Do you have to record all instruments at the same time, or can you record them separately at any time with a recording interface? I just need to make sure, thanks.
#7
Quote by The Spoon
I have a question and i think it would fit in this thread, besides its not good enough for its own thread.

Do you have to record all instruments at the same time, or can you record them separately at any time with a recording interface? I just need to make sure, thanks.


Well, obviously, if you are a solo artist, you'll be relying on layering your music, but if you're in a band, it depends on your own preferences.

For example, the bassist in my band doesn't like recording his basslines seperate from the band, so we record drums, guitar and bass at the same time. He says it makes him feel awkward and more prone to stupid mistakes. Same thing applies to my lead guitarist who also sings backing vocals, he records vocals at the same time as me because he doesn't like being in the booth on his own with everyone looking at him.
#8
Quote by gallagher2006
Well, obviously, if you are a solo artist, you'll be relying on layering your music, but if you're in a band, it depends on your own preferences.

For example, the bassist in my band doesn't like recording his basslines seperate from the band, so we record drums, guitar and bass at the same time. He says it makes him feel awkward and more prone to stupid mistakes. Same thing applies to my lead guitarist who also sings backing vocals, he records vocals at the same time as me because he doesn't like being in the booth on his own with everyone looking at him.

Okay thanks man!