#1
ok i have been going crazy trying to figure this out for th last month.

Are scales just set position on the guitar with different names that u play up and down the neck or is there some other meaning to them? dam its just so confusing
#2
no they are not just position they are notes that make positions your meaning to them is to solo. hear the scale notes in your head and start shredding! basicly major scale goes just by rule WWHWWWH (whole step whole step half step...) example in C it would be
C w D w E h F w G w A w b h c

I'm not really good explainer but i try.
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#3
in short... yes. There is signifigant musical theory behind them and many famous riffs are based off them. Take the black dog riff by led zeppelin, its based of a simple scale but when played with the right rhythm and combonation on notes on the scale, u get an amazing sounding riff thats somwhat simple to play if you practice scales at all.
#4
no they are not just position they are notes that make positions your meaning to them is to solo.


Soloing has very little to do with it. Scales are more important in harmony than in melody.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#5
yeah but how the hell do you turn the minor pentatonic scale which looks simple into the black dog riff which is all over the dam neck and they dont look very similar at all?
#6
Quote by VR 07
yeah but how the hell do you turn the minor pentatonic scale which looks simple into the black dog riff which is all over the dam neck and they dont look very similar at all?


The minor pentatonic covers the entire fretboard, as do all scales.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
ya but if you look at both the minor scale does not look anything like that riff
#8
Quote by VR 07
ok i have been going crazy trying to figure this out for th last month.

Are scales just set position on the guitar with different names that u play up and down the neck or is there some other meaning to them? dam its just so confusing


Here is a good definition from Wiki:

In music, a scale is a group of musical notes that provides material for part or all of a musical work. Scales are ordered in pitch or pitch class, with their ordering providing a measure of musical distance. The distance between two successive notes in a scale is called a "scale step."

scale definition: WIki

On the guitar the scale is organized into patterns or shapes. A position on the guitar is a particular area starting on a particular fret on the guitar.

5th position = 5th fret
12th position = 12 fret



The notes starting at the 12th fret are considered to be in the 12th position


Here is a G Major scale pattern in the 7th position:
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Feb 4, 2008,
#9
that helps a lot. but still dont understand how you come up with the different shapes and patterns
#10
Check out this page...you'll notice that as with any scale, the notes that make a minor pentatonic is all over the fretboard. I *think* black dog was in the key of Amin. So here's a link to an Amin pentatonic.

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php?qqq=FULL&scch=A&scchnam=Pentatonic+Minor&get2=Get

Guitarists have come up with various patterns/box shapes/ whatever you want to call it to make it easier to play within the scale.

The most common are 6/1, 6/2, 6/4, 5/1, 5/2, 5/4 for ANY scale. The numbers simply mean for example 5/4...that the root of the scale is on the 5th string and your 4th finger is positioned to play it, thus a 5/4 pattern.

I hope it clears up some of the confusion!
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#11
Quote by VR 07
that helps a lot. but still dont understand how you come up with the different shapes and patterns


Take the intervals in the scale and use them to find the notes. The major scale, for example, is composed of: a root, a major second, a major third, a perfect fourth, a perfect fifth, a major sixth, and a major seventh. C major then, is composed of the notes CDEFGAB. You can play those notes anywhere on the fretboard and in any order.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#12
Quote by VR 07
that helps a lot. but still dont understand how you come up with the different shapes and patterns



Well the patterns are there based on how the guitar is layed out.

A Major scale has a certain formula ( W W H W W W H ) W = whole step (2frets) H = half step (1fret). If you follow that formula on 1 string it will look like this:




That is a good way to see the scale formula, but when it comes to playing, its not very convenient. So what happens is that on guitar we play those notes across multiple strings like this:



This is whats considered a scale pattern. (this is just 1 octave of the pattern btw)


So to reiterate:

position: where on the guitar you are playing

scale pattern: a useful shape that enables guitarists to visualize a particular scale on the neck


- scale patterns, like chords and other shapes, can be played in different positions on the neck.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Feb 4, 2008,
#13
What Black Dog does is switch scale positions during the riff. Its really just 2 positions, but don't think in boxes, just use the boxes to help find notes.
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