#1
Ok, i think im starting to understand scales, now i just need to know how to use them. I also learned scales by identifying the individual notes, not by using those box pattern things. Is that wrong? Would I benefit from knowing the scales boxes? Now, Say a song is in G minor, I could use the G minor pentatonic scale for soloing right? While soloing, could I play the G minor pentatonic scale all over the neck and still have the solo sound good as long as I stick with the G minor pentatonic scale? When improvising, we'll say using the G minor pentatonic, how do I know what combinations of notes to use? Do i go up the scale then back down? Do i go halfway up the scale then start from the top and go back down? Is it something that you just have to get the feel for? Thanks
#2
when your improvising you have to get the feel for it. theres no rule about how far you go up the scale etc. just practice and you will know when you are feeling it.
"I wanna see movies of my dreams"
#3
well there really is only 2 G minor pentatonic scale positions that i no of lol starting on teh 3 and starting on the 13
#4
Would I benefit from knowing the scales boxes?
In combination with knowing the notes and intervals, knowing what shape those intervals take on the fretboard can help you visualise how you are going to move and flow with your improvising.


Now, Say a song is in G minor, I could use the G minor pentatonic scale for soloing right? While soloing, could I play the G minor pentatonic scale all over the neck and still have the solo sound good as long as I stick with the G minor pentatonic scale?

Yes to all.


When improvising, we'll say using the G minor pentatonic, how do I know what combinations of notes to use?
Generally its good to follow chord tones, apart from that, it's up to you. Scales don't play themselves into a solo.


Do i go up the scale then back down? Do i go halfway up the scale then start from the top and go back down?
If you want


it something that you just have to get the feel for?
Very much so.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#5
Prime pretty much answered all your questions. I just wanted to tell you to jam in the scale once in a while and get the feel for them, this will help you develop your style. Learn licks too but don't play them exclusively, connect them with passages and try and be melodic. Listen to yourself when you play. I put myself in the mind set that I am writing music and not just soloing.
#6
Quote by The Mizfit
well there really is only 2 G minor pentatonic scale positions that i no of lol starting on teh 3 and starting on the 13


Really? I was under the impression you could play a scale anywhere on the fretboard where there was a root note of that scale. I guess I was wrong.
#7
Soloing is a very liquid, there is no real "right" or "wrong" way. It is interpretive. There are some things to know besides the scales though... If you just run a bunch of notes in the proper scale, you get a very generic sounding solo. Depending on what's happening with the music, try experimenting with when and how you hit the tonic notes. Sometimes, the timing and how you get back to the tonic note anchors the solo. Try experimenting with 3rd's and 5ths, bends, bending from positions out of key into key, playing low passages with a dramatic shift to the high end of the scale, or really anything else to create dramatic tension.

Another good scale for adding flavor(if used tastefully) is the chromatic scale. It can provide some simple out of key flavoring that is sometimes a very nice touch.

Typically the human ear doesn't absorb all that is played in a solo with really fast passages, but it's the particular dramatic events within the solo that really makes it something special. There are a million tricks and a million possibilities. As Ouchies stated, look at it from a standpoint that you're writing. Often times some of the best solo licks can be taken from riffs and passages that you pass up on in the writing process.

Listen to the solo of Man In the Box and how nonlinear it is, and how the solo in No More Tears is really brought to life by the bends, and the movement of simple box patterns at the end that creates all that tension right before the last bent/shaken note.
Washburn D-12
Ibanez RG
Ibanez RG 7321
Epiphone Les Paul / EMG 81 85
Fender MIM Ash Stratocaster
Digitech Whammy
Small Stone Phaser
Boss SD-1-Modded
Boss MT-2-Modded
Boss CE-5
Boss DD-3-Modded
ISP Decimator
B-52 AT-212
Last edited by Reildeal at Feb 4, 2008,
#8
how do I know what combinations of notes to use? Do i go up the scale then back down? Do i go halfway up the scale then start from the top and go back down? Is it something that you just have to get the feel for? Thanks


Simple answer: Use whatever notes you want, in any order.

Really? I was under the impression you could play a scale anywhere on the fretboard where there was a root note of that scale. I guess I was wrong.


No, he doesn't know what he's talking about. All scales cover the entire fretboard.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#9
Quote by The Mizfit
well there really is only 2 G minor pentatonic scale positions that i no of lol starting on teh 3 and starting on the 13

why would anybody post here if they knew absolutly nothing about the topic
#10
Quote by Peaceful Rocker
why would anybody post here if they knew absolutly nothing about the topic


Your kidding right? Isnt that the whole point of a forum? To get information from people who DO Know?
#11
Quote by littlec
Your kidding right? Isnt that the whole point of a forum? To get information from people who DO Know?


Why would people give advice when they know absolutely nothing about the topic?
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#12
Quote by littlec
Your kidding right? Isnt that the whole point of a forum? To get information from people who DO Know?


I think there has been some confusion. I don't claim to be a virtuoso. I said I am beginning to understand scales. I knew you guys knew more about this than me which is why I came in here- so you guys could help me out. You guys have pretty much answered my questions and I appreciate it. Sorry if I created any confusion.
#13
Hey rockadoodle, I think that they are referring to The Mizfit's post, not anything you said bro.... Hope we've been able to help you out at least a little bit. Play around and experiment man, that's the fun in music! Rock on man

I've played for a pretty long time, but I'm really new to this forum, so I'd like to take this opportunity to say Hi to everyone here
Washburn D-12
Ibanez RG
Ibanez RG 7321
Epiphone Les Paul / EMG 81 85
Fender MIM Ash Stratocaster
Digitech Whammy
Small Stone Phaser
Boss SD-1-Modded
Boss MT-2-Modded
Boss CE-5
Boss DD-3-Modded
ISP Decimator
B-52 AT-212
#14
Quote by rockadoodle
Ok, i think im starting to understand scales, now i just need to know how to use them. I also learned scales by identifying the individual notes, not by using those box pattern things. Is that wrong?


No its not wrong.... but you shouldnt avoid the patterns. They are there, and there is no reason to avoid learning them. If anything they are very useful.
Quote by rockadoodle
Would I benefit from knowing the scales boxes?

yes, definitely

Quote by rockadoodle
Now, Say a song is in G minor, I could use the G minor pentatonic scale for soloing right? While soloing, could I play the G minor pentatonic scale all over the neck and still have the solo sound good as long as I stick with the G minor pentatonic scale?

yep

Quote by rockadoodle

When improvising, we'll say using the G minor pentatonic, how do I know what combinations of notes to use? Do i go up the scale then back down? Do i go halfway up the scale then start from the top and go back down? Is it something that you just have to get the feel for? Thanks


What you need to do is spend some time learning solos. The answer to those questions can really only be answered by you. They are a matter of taste and opinion.... both of which you will begin to form as you gain more experience playing solos. Learn solos you like that are within (or reasonably within) your skill level. That will teach you how to apply the scales and other musical concepts that you are working on.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Feb 4, 2008,