#1
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/04/technology/04link.html?_r=2&ref=technology&oref=slogin&oref=slogin

I felt that this needed it's own thread.

STYLES make fights — or so goes the boxing cliché. In 2008, they make presidential campaigns, too.

This is especially true for the two remaining Democrats, Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama. Reporters covering the candidates have already resorted to traditional analysis of style — fashion choices, manner of speaking, even the way they laugh. Yet, according to design experts, the candidates have left a clear blueprint of their personal style — perhaps even a window into their souls — through the Web sites they have created to raise money, recruit volunteers and generally meet-and-greet online.

On one thing, the experts seem to agree. The differences between hillaryclinton.com and barackobama.com can be summed up this way: Barack Obama is a Mac, and Hillary Clinton is a PC.

That is, Mr. Obama’s site is more harmonious, with plenty of white space and a soft blue palette. Its task bar is reminiscent of the one used at Apple’s iTunes site. It signals in myriad ways that it was designed with a younger, more tech-savvy audience in mind — using branding techniques similar to the ones that have made the iPod so popular.

“With Obama’s site, all the features and elements are seamlessly integrated, just like the experience of using a program on a Macintosh computer,” said Alice Twemlow, chairwoman of the M.F.A. program in design criticism at the School of Visual Arts (who is a Mac user).

It is designed, she said, even down to the playful logos that illustrate choices like, Volunteer or Register to Vote. She likened those touches to the elaborate, painstaking packaging Apple uses to woo its customers.

The linking of Mr. Obama with Mac and Mrs. Clinton with PCs has already become something of a theme during the primary. Early in the campaign, a popular YouTube parody of Apple’s “1984” Super Bowl ad made Mrs. Clinton the face of oppression. This week on The Huffington Post, Douglas T. Kendall, the founder of the Community Rights Counsel, a public interest law firm, made the connection more explicit.

But the designers believe the comparisons — but not perhaps the Orwellian overtones — are apt. In contrast to barackobama.com, Mrs. Clinton’s site uses a more traditional color scheme of dark blue, has sharper lines dividing content and employs cookie-cutter icons next to its buttons for volunteering, and the like.

“Hillary’s is way more hectic, it’s got all these, what look like parody ads,” said Ms. Twemlow, who is not a citizen and cannot vote in the election.

Jason Santa Maria, creative director of Happy Cog Studios, which designs Web sites, detected a basic breach of netiquette. “Hillary’s text is all caps, like shouting,” he said. There are “many messages vying for attention,” he said, adding, “Candidates are building a brand and it should be consistent.”

But Emily Chang, the cofounder of Ideacodes, a Web designing and consulting firm, detected consistent messages, and summed them up: “His site is more youthful and hers more regal.”

Mr. Obama’s site is almost universally praised. Even Martin Avila, the general manager of the company responsible for the Republican Ron Paul’s Web site, said simply, “Barack’s site is amazing.”

But the compliments are clearly double-edged.

While Apple’s ad campaign maligns the PC by using an annoying man in a plain suit as its personification, it is not clear that aligning with the trendy Mac aesthetic is good politics. The iPod may be a dominant music player, but the Mac is still a niche computer. PC, no doubt, would win the Electoral College by historic proportions (with Mac perhaps carrying Vermont).

While Mr. Santa Maria praised barackobama.com for having “this welcoming quality,” he added that it was “ethereal, vaporous and someone could construe it as nebulous.” He said there was a bit of the “Lifetime channel effect, you know, vasoline on the lens” to create a softer effect on the viewer. The “hectic” site that the Clinton campaign is offering could actually be quite strategic, exactly in step with her branding. After all, Mrs. Clinton repeatedly emphasizes how hard she will work for the average American “starting on Day 1.” If she comes across as energetic online, that may simply be her intention. If she shouts a bit more, typographically speaking, that may be the better to be heard.

Unlike the Republicans, the Democratic contenders have incorporated social-networking tools to their sites — allowing supporters to create their own groups, for example, though Mr. Obama is considered the pacesetter in that regard.

“Obama’s campaign gained attention here in the Bay area tech community early on when he launched the My.BarackObama.com portal that allowed for personal blogging from the public, messaging with other supporters, and a host of other tools,” Ms. Chang wrote in an e-mail message.

On the big Internet issues like copyright, Lawrence Lessig, a Stanford law professor who is supporting Mr. Obama, said there was “not a big difference on paper” between the two Democrats. Both tend to favor the users of the Internet over those who “own the pipes.” He is impressed by Mr. Obama’s proposal to “make all public government data available to everybody to use as they wish.”

In the long run, however, Mr. Lessig believes that it is the ability to motivate the electorate that matters, not simple matters of style. And he’s a Mac user from way back.
Wolfie, Moley, Witty, Dgmey, Grundy
#3
fuck both of em
Originally Posted by fatdanny
Also, check out Autopsy, the vocalist sounds like hes about to eat your grandmother while f
#6
i really think ppl should stop looking at the character of presidents, and soley look at what they will do (sadly most lie)

i personally dont like the woman hillary, but i like the idea of her national healthcare (too bad it will be implemented poorly)

and barack (sp?) seems like a really nice guy, i cant comment on his policies as i havent looked into them much
#10
Quote by paintITblack39
Sooo .... Ron Paul is linux?

LINUX IS A PC, FAGORT LOLOLOLOLOL#

Ron Paul is one of those Asus laptop things nobody is sure how to classify.
#11
Quote by Vermintide
LINUX IS A PC, FAGORT LOLOLOLOLOL#


Huh? Linux is an OS like Windows...

Hey, why is Windows generally referred to as PC?
D:
Signature.
#12
What else are you going to call it? It's catchier than OSX vs. Windows. And you can't call it Mac vs. Dell/Asus/Toshiba/Sony/etc.
Wolfie, Moley, Witty, Dgmey, Grundy
#13
Quote by Vermintide
LINUX IS A PC, FAGORT LOLOLOLOLOL#

Ron Paul is one of those Asus laptop things nobody is sure how to classify.

Linux is an OS, much different than Windows.
Sent from my iPad.
#14
Quote by paintITblack39
Sooo .... Ron Paul is linux?





I found this funny for some odd reason.
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I am Spartikus


Tremulous name: <CD>Mustang?
#15
Quote by paintITblack39
Linux is an OS, much different than Windows.

still fallls under the "Personal Computer" category, also refered to as, anything but mac
#16
Quote by paintITblack39
Linux is an OS, much different than Windows.

No, you missed my point. If it's mac vs. PC, OS is irrelevant. Linux is run on a PC. The TS should have put OS X vs. Windows

Anyway, I was being sarcastic, hence the caps and typo.
#17
Quote by Vermintide
No, you missed my point. If it's mac vs. PC, OS is irrelevant. Linux is run on a PC. The TS should have put OS X vs. Windows

Anyway, I was being sarcastic, hence the caps and typo.


Hey! No! I'm the messenger!



Besides! What if we're talking about hardware as well? The overall computer? That's why people refer to a Windows machine as a PC, even though Mac is technically a PC as well.
Wolfie, Moley, Witty, Dgmey, Grundy