#1
My teacher is teaching me 'how to solo'.

Now I know soloing is about feel and your own style and there isn't one specific way to solo blah blah blah. But he was telling me how solos have been analyzed over the years in such depth that there's only so many things you can do in solos and in guitar lessons he's gonna teach me each one.

First step is memorizing to all the major scales (For minor scales I will just use Relative Minors). I'm not interested in the pentatonics because personally you can't write a very techincal solo.

I memorized all my scales and now I'm working on being able to play all my scales in thirds and then I'll do the other steps.

I think some of the other ones were;

half (or something meaning not full) arpeggios
full arpeggios

Does what I'm doing sound right?
#3
Quote by tom-the-lawn
I'm not interested in the pentatonics because personally you can't write a very techincal solo.


lol. Yes you can.

The best way to learn to solo is once you learn your shapes get a simple blues backing track and just play along. This will work on your phrasing and your licks.
Quote by paulefty
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#4
Quote by Shackman10
Yeah that'll be awesome. Your solos will be so original and have so much feeling!

Thanks asshole. I was just asking a question and I seriously don't see why you couldn't have just answered it.

No I don't play on playing 160mph running through every scale and having them sound all the same (I wouldn't be able to) I'm just looking for something more then the pentatonics.
#5
Quote by Shackman10
Yeah that'll be awesome. Your solos will be so original and have so much feeling!

GTFO noob

Yes, once you memorize the theory behind it, you can start adding your own personal touch and feeling to them

Me personaly i add a lot of vibro with pull offs and string skipping but you add whatever the hell you want to

AND MOST IMPORTANTLY

Do not listen to people like shackman10, my guitar idol Randy Rhoads had an extensive knowledge of theory and manged to make both original and meaningful solos

Keep it up.
#7
Quote by ouchies
What in the world is a "half" arpeggio as opposed to a "full" arpeggio?

I wasn't sure if that's what my guitar teacher said and judging by your comment I misheard.
#9
Quote by Dance_of_Death
GTFO noob

Yes, once you memorize the theory behind it, you can start adding your own personal touch and feeling to them

Me personaly i add a lot of vibro with pull offs and string skipping but you add whatever the hell you want to

AND MOST IMPORTANTLY

Do not listen to people like shackman10, my guitar idol Randy Rhoads had an extensive knowledge of theory and manged to make both original and meaningful solos

Keep it up.

Thanks a lot Dance_of_Death it's rare that you'll find someone who'll actually answer your questions on this site.
#10
Quote by tom-the-lawn
Thanks asshole. I was just asking a question and I seriously don't see why you couldn't have just answered it.

No I don't play on playing 160mph running through every scale and having them sound all the same (I wouldn't be able to) I'm just looking for something more then the pentatonics.


I thought my message was pretty clear...

What you're doing does NOT sound right.
#11
I think it sounds perfectly fine to me.

Arpeggios, and the Major Modes, thats a good start.

Make sure you learn how to apply your knowledge, search up videos online to show you too, those help so much. You can always pick out a few cool things.

Also, I wouldn't disregard the pentatonic, its an incredibly fun scale to use. It keeps the solo fresh if you go in and out of it, in my opinion.
#12
Quote by Shackman10
I thought my message was pretty clear...

What you're doing does NOT sound right.

Please clarify, what would YOU tell him to do?

I see nothing wrong his routine, and once he finishes this he can learn more advanced theoy and write these original and meaningful solos you are talking about


Besides, as the great Russian composer Sergei Prokofiev says "There are still so many beautiful things to be said in C major."
#13
Quote by tom-the-lawn
Thanks a lot Dance_of_Death it's rare that you'll find someone who'll actually answer your questions on this site.



Actually 9/10 people answer,

in this case everyone has answered your question but you just took offense because he did it in an unorthodox fashion, lighten up a bit.


As for the point of this topic, as a learner, what you're doing is sound for writing solo's, but for the love of god don't get stuck to it. Once you can comfortably do it the way you are now try to break off and feel out solos, learn to just let them groove. I may sound like some old stoner hippie or something but I'm serious.
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You should've used the Pythagorean Theorem, BITCH

BLALLALALASSISSIS *shank*
#14
Quote by tom-the-lawn
My teacher is teaching me 'how to solo'.

Now I know soloing is about feel and your own style and there isn't one specific way to solo blah blah blah. But he was telling me how solos have been analyzed over the years in such depth that there's only so many things you can do in solos and in guitar lessons he's gonna teach me each one.

First step is memorizing to all the major scales (For minor scales I will just use Relative Minors). I'm not interested in the pentatonics because personally you can't write a very techincal solo.

I memorized all my scales and now I'm working on being able to play all my scales in thirds and then I'll do the other steps.

I think some of the other ones were;

half (or something meaning not full) arpeggios
full arpeggios

Does what I'm doing sound right?


I think your better off trusting your teacher. Let him guide you to understand this stuff.

to answer your question: yeah, what your doing sounds right. Just stick with it, and dont question your teacher everytime he tries to show you something. Chances are, he knows what hes talking about.

another quick tip: dont avoid pentatonics. They are useful scales with their own unique sound. Dont let the fact that they only have 5 notes fool you.
shred is gaudy music
#15
Quote by Synyster Gates
Actually 9/10 people answer,

in this case everyone has answered your question but you just took offense because he did it in an unorthodox fashion, lighten up a bit.


As for the point of this topic, as a learner, what you're doing is sound for writing solo's, but for the love of god don't get stuck to it. Once you can comfortably do it the way you are now try to break off and feel out solos, learn to just let them groove. I may sound like some old stoner hippie or something but I'm serious.

Yeah you're right a fair bit of people do answer just not so much in the place I usually go to; The Pit, haha.

No I know what you mean by not getting stuck to it and after I get it go by feel.

I didn't care that much it's just that the thing that pissed me off about Stackman or whatever is that he was like "NO UR RONG!" but he didn't take that extra step to say this is what you do: (insert what he thinks)

Regardless my guitar teacher has a masters degree in music and so obviously I will go with what he says over any person I meet on this site, I was just wondering if this is what most people did or if there's anything extra you can do I guess.
#16
Quote by tom-the-lawn
Yeah you're right a fair bit of people do answer just not so much in the place I usually go to; The Pit, haha.

No I know what you mean by not getting stuck to it and after I get it go by feel.

I didn't care that much it's just that the thing that pissed me off about Stackman or whatever is that he was like "NO UR RONG!" but he didn't take that extra step to say this is what you do: (insert what he thinks)

Regardless my guitar teacher has a masters degree in music and so obviously I will go with what he says over any person I meet on this site, I was just wondering if this is what most people did or if there's anything extra you can do I guess.


i don't mean to sound like an asshole here, but jimmy page doesn't have a masters degree in music. and neither did hendrix. my point is that don't be so impressed by degrees and **** like that. If they were so good at what they did they wouldn't be teaching guitar at a music store or w/e. that's what i've always thought about that. they are probably really ****in good at playing the guitar, but they have no sense of creativity. they get stuck with all the "rules" and "methods" and "theory" of rock guitar, they lose all their creativity and they can only teach. well, i'm not saying not to take lessons or not to learn theory and stuff, but don't make the mistake of just learning all that theory and forgetting that the most important part of making a piece of music or a solo, is that although it's not may not be technically correct, it moves you. it grooves, it has melodic and emotional value relevant to the song, and it comes from how you feel, not from wat you memorized or read in a book. that i think is the most helpful advice i can give you, i hope you see wat im saying

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#17
Quote by psychokiller99
i don't mean to sound like an asshole here, but jimmy page doesn't have a masters degree in music. and neither did hendrix. my point is that don't be so impressed by degrees and **** like that. If they were so good at what they did they wouldn't be teaching guitar at a music store or w/e. that's what i've always thought about that. they are probably really ****in good at playing the guitar, but they have no sense of creativity. they get stuck with all the "rules" and "methods" and "theory" of rock guitar, they lose all their creativity and they can only teach. well, i'm not saying not to take lessons or not to learn theory and stuff, but don't make the mistake of just learning all that theory and forgetting that the most important part of making a piece of music or a solo, is that although it's not may not be technically correct, it moves you. it grooves, it has melodic and emotional value relevant to the song, and it comes from how you feel, not from wat you memorized or read in a book. that i think is the most helpful advice i can give you, i hope you see wat im saying



wow thats an incredibly ignorant point of view about teachers. You think that because someone teaches at a music store they have zero creativity? WOW!! pretty stupid dude.
shred is gaudy music
#18
Quote by psychokiller99
i don't mean to sound like an asshole here, but jimmy page doesn't have a masters degree in music. and neither did hendrix. my point is that don't be so impressed by degrees and **** like that. If they were so good at what they did they wouldn't be teaching guitar at a music store or w/e. that's what i've always thought about that. they are probably really ****in good at playing the guitar, but they have no sense of creativity. they get stuck with all the "rules" and "methods" and "theory" of rock guitar, they lose all their creativity and they can only teach. well, i'm not saying not to take lessons or not to learn theory and stuff, but don't make the mistake of just learning all that theory and forgetting that the most important part of making a piece of music or a solo, is that although it's not may not be technically correct, it moves you. it grooves, it has melodic and emotional value relevant to the song, and it comes from how you feel, not from wat you memorized or read in a book. that i think is the most helpful advice i can give you, i hope you see wat im saying


I can understand what you're saying. But for the record unfortunately making it big has more to do then with just how good you are. I live in Newfoundland, the province of the very eastern side of Canada and it's an island and it is quite a bad place to make it with a band, in fact it's not do able, the bands that made it from here had to move to bigger places first.

But yeah feel over everything else, the theory and **** is to help you out but all the stuff you learn from a book shouldn't consume all your playing.
#19
Quote by GuitarMunky
wow thats an incredibly ignorant point of view about teachers. You think that because someone teaches at a music store they have zero creativity? WOW!! pretty stupid dude.


oh well, i can see where you misunderstood me. i don't think that just because you teach guitar at a music store you are uncreative. but i think it can happen. i think there are bad teachers, and i think there are good teachers, and then there are amazing teachers that can really be really helpful and help you improve as a guitar player. i'm hoping that the TS has one of those amazing teachers. but my point was that SOME of those teachers that are theory buffs really don't have anything to offer other than "here are the scales. learn'em and uh get creative with them". granted you can't teach someone how to "feel" the music and watnot. but that's another point that i wanted to make. once you learn all the theory you think you need, you need to remember to put the "feeling" into it and not to be dictated by "rules" and such. well i hope i was clear this time around, so uh...**** OFF GuitarMunky!!!!
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#20
Quote by psychokiller99
oh well, i can see where you misunderstood me. i don't think that just because you teach guitar at a music store you are uncreative. but i think it can happen. i think there are bad teachers, and i think there are good teachers, and then there are amazing teachers that can really be really helpful and help you improve as a guitar player. i'm hoping that the TS has one of those amazing teachers. but my point was that SOME of those teachers that are theory buffs really don't have anything to offer other than "here are the scales. learn'em and uh get creative with them". granted you can't teach someone how to "feel" the music and watnot. but that's another point that i wanted to make. once you learn all the theory you think you need, you need to remember to put the "feeling" into it and not to be dictated by "rules" and such. well i hope i was clear this time around, so uh...**** OFF GuitarMunky!!!!


well now i agree with you, so YOU ****off!!!! LOL

as far as there being bad teachers. Yea, theres good and bad everything. Your earlier post made it sound like their teaching because they are not good enough to make it big. That is pure foolishness.... but obviously you realize that.
shred is gaudy music
#21
Quote by GuitarMunky
well now i agree with you, so YOU ****off!!!! LOL



lol, alrighty glad we were able to get on the same page

Traynor YCV50 Blue
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VHT 2x12 w/ V30's
#22
You should know scales, but not go over them over and over again so you can sound like one of many shredders who no one likes except other guitarists and plays generic, superspeed riffs over everything.

Try just listening to music and soloing over it the way that you think is best, even if you're not using arpeggios and broken 3rds.