#1
i'm running a mesa v-twin into the clean channel of my mesa 50 cal+
and now that i've made some recordings and went back to listen to them i notice it now.
an OD will help this issue?
don't worry, i'm not going to ask which one. i'll do a search
#2
Metal Muff works wonders for a bass. My co-guitarist bought our bassist one, and he can make it sound ultra-muffled or just like thunder. Gives it a nice wide range.
--Traxxus
#3
Quote by Traxxus
Metal Muff works wonders for a bass. My co-guitarist bought our bassist one, and he can make it sound ultra-muffled or just like thunder. Gives it a nice wide range.


hahahahaha
i meant the bass notes' response on my guitar. its flabby instead of tight and punchy
#5
^ an od, like maxon 808 should fix that right up
Gear
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser
Ibanez EX 470 (1991)

Peavey 6505 combo
Vox Valvetronix AD15VT
Danville 1X12 Cab
Kustom 12w tube

Dunlop Crybaby
DOD overdrive(YJM)
Boss Ns-2
PodXt
Dod 250 Overdrive
#7
An OD would just saturate the tone, and probably just make it more muddy.

Get a 10 Band EQ and tighten the low end/raise the high end
Epiphone G-400
GFS Crunchy PAF - Bridge

DigiTech Bad Monkey
iSP Decimator

New Amp Fund: Depleted
#8
Don't call your fish fat; you might hurt its feelings!


...What type of floor surface is your amp sitting on?
Recognized by the Official EG/GG&A Who To Listen To List 2008
Quote by utsapp89
^I'd let a pro look at it. Once you get into the technicalities of screws...well, it's just a place you don't want to be, friend.
#9
Cut your bass. As a guitarist you don't need bass anyway (listen to guys like EVH and Slash - no bass in their tone).
"A wise man once said, never discuss philosophy or politics in a disco environment." - Frank Zappa
Quote by Jinskee
Don't question the X.
<Frenchy> I'm such a failure
#10
Potential solutions...

1) Turn down the bass
2) Turn up the mids
3) Use a closed back cab instead of an open back one (I don't know what you're using now)
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#13
Move the amp, move the mic, and +11 to xifr. I cut through just fine in a 5 piece jam band with bass 3, mid 7, trebble 6. With single coils.
#14
Quote by xifr
Cut your bass. As a guitarist you don't need bass anyway (listen to guys like EVH and Slash - no bass in their tone).


+1
#15
all fantastic suggestions
1. its an open-back combo
2. i have it sitting on a thick foam pad, because i have an old lady for a down stairs neighbor. although i think she's mostly deaf anyway. other than that, its all hard wood floors.
3. mic is shure sm57, tascam interface, garageband (say what you will). the mic is right up against the cloth grill. should i pull it back?
4. my amp is set up like so:

---\

its a dividing wall between 2 rooms. so the 3 dashes would be the wall, and the back slash is the angle of the combo amp resting against one of the corners. so it is in a corner, but just the other way around. strange description, i know.

i'll try starting from scratch with my tone settings. thanks a ton

edit: listen to slash and evh? ugh, do i HAVE to? where am i? in guantanemo?
Last edited by sethp at Feb 5, 2008,
#16
You might wanna throw it on the hardwood floors when she's not around to see if it sounds the same.


Nobody laughed at my fish joke? Tough crowd.
Recognized by the Official EG/GG&A Who To Listen To List 2008
Quote by utsapp89
^I'd let a pro look at it. Once you get into the technicalities of screws...well, it's just a place you don't want to be, friend.
#17
Is the mic closer to the edge of the speaker, or closer to the center? Moving it closer to the center can eliminate some bass flab, but don't get so close that it starts sounding shrill.
ESP LTD EC-256 and a Fender Deluxe VM
#18
Quote by FacingUsAll
You might wanna throw it on the hardwood floors when she's not around to see if it sounds the same.


Nobody laughed at my fish joke? Tough crowd.


That's because it's so out of plaice in this thread.



...



Anyway, having the amp on wooden floors can really have a negative affect on your bass. I play in my room and my amp sounds terrible, I play in my living room, the amp sounds much better (concrete floor).
...
#19
Quote by bartdevil_metal
That's because it's so out of plaice in this thread.



...



Anyway, having the amp on wooden floors can really have a negative affect on your bass. I play in my room and my amp sounds terrible, I play in my living room, the amp sounds much better (concrete floor).


yes, the joke was funny. but my fish IS fat. i spend $300 for a 6-month gym membership and its only gone twice. so not only is it fat, its a lazy bastard too

i'll try laying down some concrete. hahahaha
#20
Quote by Kendall
Is the mic closer to the edge of the speaker, or closer to the center? Moving it closer to the center can eliminate some bass flab, but don't get so close that it starts sounding shrill.


i think the mic was placed between the edge of the speaker and the bulb in the middle. i'll try moving it a little closer to the center.
how does moving it away from the speaker make it sound?
#21
your recording setup is fair enough, but mic position and technique is key for any recording.
I suggest keeping the mic up close to the speaker.

as for what position effects what sound, try a few spots out, record, and then listen.
every interface makes small changes in the overall recording sound and so you should have to try it for yourself.

normally you can go close or far with the mic
or you can go on/off axis to the speaker.
#22
If the mesas have tube and solid state rectifier options, try switching them both to SS rectifier. tube rects are commonly known for loose flabby lower frequencies

you could also try eqing as others have suggested, you might want to take down the 'cloud' area (around 80 hz - 120 hz) by a few decibels, and raise deep bass area (under 80 hz) by a few db to compensate.