#1
Hi guys,

I just recently picked up a visual sound Jekyll & Hyde pedal and I was wondering if anybody else used this pedal that has a good setting that reflects the tone of Matt Bellamy of Muse. Its kind of hard to do since it's an overdrive and a distortion. I know he uses a Fuzz Factory, but after experimenting around for a while, I just wanted some other peoples input. Im using a Gibson SG through a Fender Hot Rod Deville 410. Let me know anything. Thanks.
#2
It's really a very distinct fuzz sound, you couldn't really replicate it with a Jekyll and Hyde.
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#4
Lots of gain and compression with not much distortion. On the albums he uses a Soldano SLO, which has huge amounts of gain, yet still remains clear. The Diezels he uses live are mostly the same way - uber high gained amps with extreme clarity. I doubt your HRD is going to get anything close to a pleasing Muse sound even when you pump it with all the gain you can give it.
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#5
I can get some of the obscure tones from some of the B-Sides with my rig the way it is. When I borrowed my friend's Fuzz Factory, I could nail a few of the Origin of Symmetry tones. The only song I can pretty much match all the way through is 'Eternally Missed'.

The last time I experimented with a J&H in the rig, I really wasn't shooting for Muse-ish tones so I really can't comment. As antareus said though, one of the keys is stupid amounts of gain with amps that are capable of retaining note definition and clarity while being overdriven all the way. The list of such amps is very short.
ESP LTD EC-256 and a Fender Deluxe VM
#6
Quote by Kendall
I can get some of the obscure tones from some of the B-Sides with my rig the way it is. When I borrowed my friend's Fuzz Factory, I could nail a few of the Origin of Symmetry tones. The only song I can pretty much match all the way through is 'Eternally Missed'.

Quite the Bellamy-inspired rig you have there, do you have any clips of it? And what do you think of the Nailbomb?
i don't define myself by what silly groups i join.
#7
Yes, I did indeed draw inspiration from Bellamy when putting my setup together. I'm sure I'll eventually have clips, but recording (of any kind) is waiting on a few more gear purchases (I have no recording equipment).

The Nailbombs really shine with high-mid frequencies. They're extremely hot for a passive pickup and maintain a lot of low end definition (even in C standard) that a lot of other pickups seem to lack. On account of this, I generally play with my lows and mids at 11 and the highs at about 6, the presence at 4 and the depth at 10. They're surprisingly thick sounding, and have none of the classic "honk" associated with a lot of hand-wired pickups. They're happiest when soloing quite a way up the fretboard, but can chug low power chords without much drama. They're not a crisp as EMG's for metal playing, but they're designed to be more smooth than crisp, more organic and less mechanical if you will.
ESP LTD EC-256 and a Fender Deluxe VM
#8
Yeah I've been considering swapping my Duncan SH-4's out for them. I sort of assumed since Bellamy used them they'd be UBER HIGH OUTPUT but they're not, actually. They're just a bit pricey for pickups, but I do love what I've heard from them. Would you recommend an upgrade to them? I don't know if you've played the SH-4's or not.

To the OP: I apologize for sidetracking the discussion here.
i don't define myself by what silly groups i join.
#9
The SH-4's have a more consistent frequency response curve (from what I've observed) than the Nailbombs. As mentioned above the Nailbombs really shine with high-mids, and don't have the crispest lows. They're a bit different sounding than the SH-4's, thick but almost hollow sounding (if that's possible). They're certainly not for everyone, but I like them better than anything else I've tried. The biggest hurdle in trying them is the price, my pickups cost more than the guitar I put them in.
ESP LTD EC-256 and a Fender Deluxe VM
#10
The pronounced high-mids explain why Bellamy likes them so much. He seems to favor a very pronounced trebley-sort of sound, the Red Glitterati isn't mahogany even, and I think it sounds great.

Thanks for your input, might give them a shot.
i don't define myself by what silly groups i join.