#1
This bothers me since some time now

i´m having trouble mute Power chords or anything wheres more than one string envolved, when played fast, strumming up and down
It just sounds weak.

Do you change hand position or something?
#2
mine sounds a bit weak up and down to
but i can play chords faster if i go up and down
suppouse its just practice
#3
experiment with when your muting, move your hand different places to see which is comfortable and sounds good and then just practise, i have my hands just infront of the bridge.
Nathy
#4
are you playing the power chords on 2 strings or 3 strings? If you're doing it on two strings, play it like you would any one string palm muted section. Make sure you have the side of your picking hand on the bridge and just lightly touching the strings. I find it easier to play only down strokes when playing palm muted chords. Alternate picking can lead to mistakes when you're playing on more than one string at any time. If you're using 3 strings for the chord, then switch to 2 strings. you'll be playing exactly the same notes and the palm muting only ends up cancelling out the sound of the higher octave.
#5
Quote by stwb
are you playing the power chords on 2 strings or 3 strings? If you're doing it on two strings, play it like you would any one string palm muted section. Make sure you have the side of your picking hand on the bridge and just lightly touching the strings. I find it easier to play only down strokes when playing palm muted chords. Alternate picking can lead to mistakes when you're playing on more than one string at any time. If you're using 3 strings for the chord, then switch to 2 strings. you'll be playing exactly the same notes and the palm muting only ends up cancelling out the sound of the higher octave.


+1, I agree with you here, I first started palm muting all three notes of the power chord, but then realised that using 2 notes of the pwer chord sounds the same and is so much easier to play (so actually sounds better than using 3 notes). especially for playing things like sanitarium etc. you really don't need that octave of the root note
#6
Im not talking about pm when just downpicking thats absolutly not the problem

and where the hell does sanitarium have pm chords fast enough to play them alt picked, where the hell does sanitarium have pm chrords

Thanks so far anyways
Last edited by Martin^roll at Feb 5, 2008,
#7
if you can do it ok with down picking then you'll just have to practice with the alternate picking. the reason it sounds better when you down pick is because you can get a better "attack" on the strings. you're not using the up movement of your hand to pick the strings so you're using less energy. the only thing you can do is practice slowly and take your time.

and where the hell does sanitarium have pm chords fast enough to play them alt picked, where the hell does sanitarium have pm chrords


i'm sure there are some in there somewhere. and if not, maybe he threw them in because it might sound better. no need to be a d**k about it.
#9
Try tilting the pick at a forty five degree angle. You get a bit more 'attack' when alternate picking.
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#10
I can't see you play, but I have seen a lot of people have trouble with power chords and fast playing. For a start remember the golden rule of the electric guitar - you are being amped so let the equipment do that work for you. Playing punk and hard rock is like being a drummer - you need rythmn as much as you need technique. I tend to downstroke strong and pick out notes on the up, but that is just me. A common mistake is not letting the note ring long enough because you are too concerned with forming the next chord.
I was learning an intro the other day of a famous song and I stated by tapping it with my pick on the wood for 15 minutes. Then I walked through the notes looking at how I would work them for my style. Not even strumming. If you have any problem with a guitar - break it down, break it down, break it down again. Repeat, repeat, repeat. The public only see the end product, they don't see you spending hours working how to do it. Good guitarists are like magicians - they practise all day ever day and the public think "it just happens automatically for this guy."
Stop showing off and play the music!
#11
^have you even botherd reading the question?

i learnd to shrum a chord 2 years ago the question is to palm mute them probably at high speed when strumming up and down :P
Last edited by Martin^roll at Feb 5, 2008,
#12
Quote by stwb
i'm sure there are some in there somewhere. and if not, maybe he threw them in because it might sound better. no need to be a d**k about it.


thanks for the backup , should have explained I play part of it with a slight palm mute, so it is in fact palm muted 2 note chords picked alternately.

@ ts I wish I hadn't even tried to help answer yor question now, because it obvious to me that you aren't even listen to people when they give advice. Do yourself a favour and leave UG forever
#13
I am sorry you didn't like my answer. One of my constant problems in answering any question regarding music, guitars or this forum is to pitch the answer to a person I have never met, no matter hear play. I also reserve the right to speak to a wider audience.

If you want to be your own guitar teacher (and it was all I could afford!) then you have to work out how to get over barriers. The thing I learnt the hard way is that problem don't solve themselves simply by plugging away without thought.

You have a problem "palming" well that is a bit complex because some people do it different ways and some people don't do it much (if at all) because they employ techniques that negate it. So in "answering" I risk just further confusing. However that should tell you "we are not all in the same boat."

For example, one of the advantages of playing with your fingers is that you can employ "blunting" techniques impossible by other means. Take Mark Knopfler he can play a sharp double string snap and then stop it dead - indeed it is his trademark. Why? because his fingers can instantly kill any string.

(Yes, I am wandering, but I am making a point to a general audience.)

You also have to consider the ring cycle of a note. Look at any note (as a Sine wave) and you would see that it looks like a mountain range - each mountain being lower than the one before. If your timing is impeccable then you can play the perfect note and change at the lowest point in the cycle and not have to blunt. This explains (in part) the wonderful flow of notes that of, say, David Gilmour of the Pink Floyd.

Now take, for example, Johnny Ramone, king of the downwards only fast strum. Again, he often plays music where the ring cycle dictates the change. Very little is random in music. Might seem so. But when he does stop - he often stops dead to complete silence, if only for a beat. This is just a simple side palm over the six strings job. Anybody should be able to do it. This is more the beginners slopes.

So, children, what have we learned in school today? You cannot say, for certain, "the reason I cannot play this music is because I have learned to palm/blunt properly." Unless you can see the person playing the thing with a full view of the fretboard nobody can say how they are doing it. You are guessing. And you might be guessing wrong.
Stop showing off and play the music!