#1
can anyone give me tips on writing harmonies where instead of just being 3rds/fifths or an octave ahead just where two pieces are completely different but sound great together? there must be some key to easily getting it...

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#3
Make it play similar but no the same. When your melody moves two notes up the scale maybe make the harmony move up four. That's one idea atleast.
#4
Look at choral arrangements and familiarize yourself with the techniques used in them. Mainly, look at a specific style, called madrigal, which consists of (usually) four parts, soprano (high female), alto (low female), tenor (high male) and bass (low male).

They use all different types of harmonies, so it would be best to try to get your hands on some of that style and listen to it and analyze it a lot until you get the feel for the different intervals and their sounds.
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#5
You aren't limited to just 3, 5 and octave. You can technically harmonize with any of the intervals although I'd recommend avoiding 2 and 7 (not always). Try 4s and 6s. You can also switch between what intervals you are using. If you have a line, you don't HAVE to stay in 3rd harmony the whole time.
#6
most of the ideas so far work well thanks

edit: and i meant other ways than just intervals overall, biggest problem is things like mr crowley interlude - is there anything similar about the 2 parts lol?

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
Last edited by metallicafan616 at Feb 5, 2008,
#7
Quote by metallicafan616
most of the ideas so far work well thanks

edit: and i meant other ways than just intervals overall, biggest problem is things like mr crowley interlude - is there anything similar about the 2 parts lol?


You mean the guitar solo? Just write rythmn and lead instead of harmonizing.
#8
Quote by metallicafan616
there must be some key to easily getting it...


Sorry but this never exists ever in music anywhere ever. Sorry to disappoint.
#9
This is a pretty intense article written by Corwinoid (aka Ra):
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=220138
It should help, if you can understand and apply it.
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Quote by MudMartin
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Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#10
Quote by Nick_
Sorry but this never exists ever in music anywhere ever. Sorry to disappoint.


no, once you learn some theory its really not that hard to get.
#11
There are two main paths to harmony:

First you can take the academic route and study the paths others have take before you...

Or you can just explore on your own by trying a few different techniques to see what happens.

After all this is how the experts (and the people they learned from) discovered what they know. Just by finding something and then finding a way to explain it all.

Really simple things can bear fruit, like starting at the ending note of a melodic passage and ending on the beginning note. Usually there are some places where simply reversing a melody can work against you, so change it a little bit. Most likely you'll find something decent to work with.

Take the classic harmonization by thirds and simply add some flavor to it. Step chromatically down to harmonize a fifth with an ascending note.

Just experiment. Study. Experiment. That is all.
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