#1
I'm asking because I only use 5 pedals (distortion, delay, reverb, chorus and tremolo) and I'm pleased with the way they sound. They're all made by Boss. I just started recording and I'm hearing people suggest they're good for live shows, but I should get something else for recording in the studio. Personally I think they sound great on CD. What's the problem with doing it that way? Is there some major benefit I'm missing by not purchased a guitar effects processor or something?

Thanks in advance!
#2
They're probably suggesting that you use towers of rack-mounted processors or something along those lines. If you like the tone of the stomp boxes, stick with them - it makes your studio tone a hell of a lot easier to replicate when you play live.
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#3
No there's no problem with it, the reason it's suggested to get a multieffects or a rackmount is just it's easier to bring around.
Quote by killbox2490
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#5
i use a line 6 pod xt live for recording. like the guy above says though, very difficult to match the sound. actually pretty much not going to happen for me cause i'm not buying all new gear. the thing with using the line 6 for recording though is that you get perfect sound...there's not even a touch of buzz and you get powerful tone. check out my profile to hear the quality.....you may ask yourself why not use the line 6 when you play live..........i like the real tube tone better.....it sounds to thin when hooked through my amp
#6
You could use the crappiest effects in the world, and still come out with a great tone. It's called studio magic, my friend.

But yeah, go for it.
#7
I appreciate the replies everyone.

So what exactly am I missing by not going with a rack mount? Mostly higher quality effects?

I'm using pro tools to record by the way. I'm recording full songs with Guitar, vocals, bass and drums.
#8
Quote by md6040
I appreciate the replies everyone.

So what exactly am I missing by not going with a rack mount? Mostly higher quality effects?


You're not missing anything, IMO. Good rack gear is very, very expensive, and is usually reserved for professional musicians. For the average Joe, you'll spend more time working to buy rack gear than you will be playing.
#9
The only objections would be if an effect in the chain was inferior or caused noise/unwanted artifacts. Recorder are more sensitive than our ears, so pedals that sound fine live may not record well. Any minor problems the studio should be able to handle.
I'm guessing that the line outs on rack systems may make the recording engineer's job easier.
#10
Quote by uldhppi
The only objections would be if an effect in the chain was inferior or caused noise/unwanted artifacts. Recorder are more sensitive than our ears, so pedals that sound fine live may not record well. Any minor problems the studio should be able to handle.
I'm guessing that the line outs on rack systems may make the recording engineer's job easier.


You could always just run your pedalboard into a DI box, and that would essentialy do the same thing, though.

Not disagreeing with you, just a suggestion to the TS.
#12
Thanks for the help guys! Awesome stuff.

We're currently running the pedals into an expensive Marshall amp and the sound is coming out of a Marshall 4X12 cab (we're going to use a small combo tube Fender soon).
From there we're using a Shure dynamic mic that runs straight into Mbox.

I have often wondered if it would be better to put the pedals between the mic and Mbox instead. Any thoughts?
#13
Quote by md6040
Thanks for the help guys! Awesome stuff.

We're currently running the pedals into an expensive Marshall amp and the sound is coming out of a Marshall 4X12 cab (we're going to use a small combo tube Fender soon).
From there we're using a Shure dynamic mic that runs straight into Mbox.

I have often wondered if it would be better to put the pedals between the mic and Mbox instead. Any thoughts?


Nah, just keep your modulation effects in the loop of the amp, and all other effects into the front of the amp.

Though, feel free to experiment; you might find something you like!
#14
Quote by diditfortehlulz
Nah, just keep your modulation effects in the loop of the amp, and all other effects into the front of the amp.



I'm sorry, but I am a COMPLETE newb. Everything I have picked up about recording happened within the last two weeks. Before that I didn't know what protools was or what a chorus effect sounded like.

Basically, I don't even know what you just said... I am a quick learner though.
#15
Quote by md6040
I'm sorry, but I am a COMPLETE newb. Everything I have picked up about recording happened within the last two weeks. Before that I didn't know what protools was or what a chorus effect sounded like.

Basically, I have no idea what any of what you just said means.


Okay, lemme break it down for ya;

When I say modulation effects, I mean time based effects (your delay, reverb chorus and tremolo). These effects go into the effects loop of the amp, so that they're not distorted and messed up by the preamp signal.

Your distortion would go into the front of your amp. Other kinds of effects that would go into the front input would be stuff like wah, overdrive, fuzz, eq, etc.
#16
Quote by md6040
I just started recording and I'm hearing people suggest they're good for live shows, but I should get something else for recording in the studio.

I have no idea if this is what those people meant, but sometimes you'll find that it's a good idea to add certain effects only after you've recorded. This way it's easy for you to e.g. try an effect on a piece you've recorded, see if it sounds good, change settings, and so on. If you add all your effects when you do the recording, then you are stuck with whatever you happened to use at that time.

...but again, not really something you have to do, but this could be one reason why you wouldn't want to run your effects in the studio like you normally would.