#1
I really, REALLY want to get better at guitar. I feel like an idiot because I've only played guitar for a year and I haven't really learned a whole lot by learning a few riffs. I need to hear your opinions: What is a list I should learn in ORDER, please? I'm having a ton of trouble with contradicting things of what I should learn first. There's just so much. I appreciate your responses and thanks mates.
#3
This may sound like stupid advice but I got a hell of a lot better by learning Paradise City by Guns N Roses (minus the big solo at the end) it teaches good hammerons, pull offs bends etc
Theres a guy called marcos Farhat who presents good tabs and videos for most parts of the song at www.Farhat.Name you should check it out
#5
I've only learned 14 guitar chords. A, A7, Am, B7, C, D, D7, Dm, E, E7, Em, F, G, G7. And a few riffs. So I should learn arpeggios and music theory NOW? It seems complicated, and I read somewhere that learning barre chords early is good. And I'm going to practice not anchoring anymore lol.
#6
Learn power chords bar chords and the pentatonic scale and use them alot
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#7
Quote by deathpidgeon
arpeggios, trembalos, virtuosos, you know...things like that.

Way to go Strongbad. but just do what everyone else is saying.
I know now what I knew then, but I didn't know then what I know now
#8
Just learn the theory as you go. For example, since you know 14 chords already, you can learn what makes a major, minor and seventh chord (actually you might already know). Then when you learn scales you can learn the theory behind major, minor and pentatonic scales. But you'll at least have to know intervals and stuff. The beginners' article posted above is great.
#9
I understand what Pauldapro is saying. I just started learning chords a few weeks ago. I have been reading a lot here in the forums and it is showing me how much I DONT know lol. For the very beginner guitar player..this stuff is hard. Learning the basic chords is not too hard for me but it takes time. When I read how much there is to learn I feel like I am never going to be able to play even a simple song. It is kinda overwhelming. Do you guys have anything for the Totally clueless beginner? I know about 7 chords at the moment that is it and I am teaching myself using the about.com website. Hey it's free. Any easy to understand help for beginners would make me sooooo happy. Thanks!
Newbie guitar player and do my fingers hurt!
#10
btw...I am not wanting to write my own songs or even play in a band. I am hoping to get good enough to play songs with my family. Maybe play for my little boys class someday.
Newbie guitar player and do my fingers hurt!
#11
ok first make sure you have the very basics down like hammer-ons, slides, begin able to play in time etc.(you probably can do all of this). When it comes to making your own music you need theory, learn the major scale (not just the box shape) learn the intervals and chords it includes. If you want your skill at guitar to get better what you need to do really depends on what type of music you play but practicing with a metronome is always a good idea.
#12
hammer-ons, slides
Omgosh i don't even know what that means lol!
Honesly all I know so far is about 7 cords. Strumming is even new to me. One song I almost can play without looking is I am leaving on a jet plane. DONT LAUGH LOL.
The only chords in it are G C and D.
I wish I could find someone who is really bored to help me out.
I want to be good at simple songs...nothing more. I know I will never be awesome at this lol. Thanks for your reply!
Newbie guitar player and do my fingers hurt!
#13
Quote by Salemsmommy
hammer-ons, slides
Omgosh i don't even know what that means lol!
Honesly all I know so far is about 7 cords. Strumming is even new to me. One song I almost can play without looking is I am leaving on a jet plane. DONT LAUGH LOL.
The only chords in it are G C and D.
I wish I could find someone who is really bored to help me out.
I want to be good at simple songs...nothing more. I know I will never be awesome at this lol. Thanks for your reply!



Practical (actual playing)
Scales are your next aim for practical work (IMO).

Scales you need to learn:

Pentatonic Scale (there are 5 different "boxes" of the pentatonic scale that mover further up the neck as you use them.)
Major Scale (also in different positions/octaves, like the "boxes" on the pentatonic scale)
Minor Scale (similar to the pentatonic with a few extra notes, again learn the positions/octaves)

Next are chords, and you seem to have made some headway, so that's good.
Chords:

Major Chords [Open (meaning played with some open strings, not barre chords.)]
Minor Chords, also Open
Major Chords [Barred (meaning played with no open strings as transferable patterns, the simpler versions are also known as "power" chords)]
Minor Chords, also Barred

If you make headway with that stuff, then there's this
Advanced Stuff:

Modal Scales: Dorian, Mixolydian etc. (Here's a good site)
7th/9th/13th Chords

-------------------
Motor Skills should also be worked on:

Picking: Standard/Alternate/Sweeping/Hybrid
Hammer Ons/Pull Offs (this means a slur if you're musically inclined; if not there are a load of good lessons on this site; just type them in search under lessons.)
Bends
Scratch muting (makes a chcka sound when you mute the strings with your left hand)
Palm muting (listen to metallica; the chug chug sound is caused by palm muting)

--------------------

Theory:

Major and Minor chord construction (What makes a chord sound major or minor, 3rds/5ths etc. Refer to lessons)
Key/Time signatures
Basic musical notation
Learn to read tab
Modal construction
Scale construction
Scale inflections ("Blue" notes, modes)


---------------------

Sound Engineering (Electric players only):

How to/ what is an EQ
Clean, Distortion and O.D
Pickups
Valve (Tube)/ Solid State/ Hybrid amps

--------------------
The stuff in bold is advanced, and so should really be done after the rest of it is good.

I think that's enough to be going along with. Obviously don't try and learn it all at once, you'll overload yourself. Just try learning a bit a week, you'll be fine, and you'll get better with practise.

Good Luck,
...
#14
Amazing advice and info. Thank you so much. Again I copied this so I can really try to study and understand what you are saying.
Your time in posting this is MUCH appreciated. Cool profile btw!!!
Newbie guitar player and do my fingers hurt!
#15
No problemo, happy to help.

Edit: In fact, that's the first time anyone has thanked me specifically. Sigged!
Edit2: And thank you for the kind words about my profile.
...
Last edited by bartdevil_metal at Feb 10, 2008,
#16
Quote by Pauldapro
I've only learned 14 guitar chords. A, A7, Am, B7, C, D, D7, Dm, E, E7, Em, F, G, G7. And a few riffs. So I should learn arpeggios and music theory NOW? It seems complicated, and I read somewhere that learning barre chords early is good. And I'm going to practice not anchoring anymore lol.

I've been playing for a bit over a year now, and I can play arpeggios and a ton of other music theory. Oh, and I learned barre chords on the day I got my guitar. So I don't see any reason why you shouldn't get into that stuff. It will ofcourse seem complicated, but it won't be once you learn it.

Learn the scales. Especially major and minor pentatonic. That will help you a lot.
"I've been visiting a psychiatrist for some time now. He plays mind games. He asks things like 'do you masturbate'? and I say 'do you breathe?'."
Ozzy - 1975
#17
Quote by bartdevil_metal
Practical (actual playing)
Scales are your next aim for practical work (IMO).

Scales you need to learn:

Pentatonic Scale (there are 5 different "boxes" of the pentatonic scale that mover further up the neck as you use them.)
Major Scale (also in different positions/octaves, like the "boxes" on the pentatonic scale)
Minor Scale (similar to the pentatonic with a few extra notes, again learn the positions/octaves)

Next are chords, and you seem to have made some headway, so that's good.
Chords:

Major Chords [Open (meaning played with some open strings, not barre chords.)]
Minor Chords, also Open
Major Chords [Barred (meaning played with no open strings as transferable patterns, the simpler versions are also known as "power" chords)]
Minor Chords, also Barred

If you make headway with that stuff, then there's this
Advanced Stuff:

Modal Scales: Dorian, Mixolydian etc. (Here's a good site)
7th/9th/13th Chords

-------------------
Motor Skills should also be worked on:

Picking: Standard/Alternate/Sweeping/Hybrid
Hammer Ons/Pull Offs (this means a slur if you're musically inclined; if not there are a load of good lessons on this site; just type them in search under lessons.)
Bends
Scratch muting (makes a chcka sound when you mute the strings with your left hand)
Palm muting (listen to metallica; the chug chug sound is caused by palm muting)

--------------------

Theory:

Major and Minor chord construction (What makes a chord sound major or minor, 3rds/5ths etc. Refer to lessons)
Key/Time signatures
Basic musical notation
Learn to read tab
Modal construction
Scale construction
Scale inflections ("Blue" notes, modes)


---------------------

Sound Engineering (Electric players only):

How to/ what is an EQ
Clean, Distortion and O.D
Pickups
Valve (Tube)/ Solid State/ Hybrid amps

--------------------
The stuff in bold is advanced, and so should really be done after the rest of it is good.

I think that's enough to be going along with. Obviously don't try and learn it all at once, you'll overload yourself. Just try learning a bit a week, you'll be fine, and you'll get better with practise.

Good Luck,


is that the order to learn or is that just a list of stuff to learn?
#18
Quote by xsv434
is that the order to learn or is that just a list of stuff to learn?


Well, ideally yes, that is the order. But only in the different sections, so you learn the first practical (scales) while also learning a bit of theory, or something like that. The sections should really be learnt simultaneously, although the sound engineering is not as important as the other three. Like I said, the bold stuff is rally after all the other stuff is done.

Edit: I'd like to add that scales and chords can be learned at the same time, or one at a time. It really depends if you're learning to solo or play rhythm first.
...
Last edited by bartdevil_metal at Feb 11, 2008,
#19
i started playing christmas day...learned my chords and strumming patterns with a book then 2 weekd later went to guitar center and got a lynyrd skynyrd tab book and was confused as hell....then found this site and rtead just about every lesson there was and can play the "gimme three steps" intro up to speed....just find the music you really want to learn so you dont get bored...
#20
I wouldnt go for scales or theroy cause its boring and not fun.


Scales and theory will help you improve very quickly. It will help you see how songs are connected to each other, so you can take what you learn from studying one piece and apply it to another more readily.

Why re-invent the wheel?
#22
I only know the A minor pentatonic scale, and to me, it's not really boring to practice. Maybe I'm a masochist, but I like messing around with it. So here's a list of what I think I should learn and correct me if I'm missing anything or something seems out of place on the list:

Before the list that I should learn: Better picking

1. Barre chords
2. Music Theory
3. Scales (hard to decide which one should be learned first between theory and scales, because they're both vastly important, and I suck at decisions)
4. Arpeggios

This is it right now. This is probably going to keep me busy for a while, besides, I need to put this TO USE for making songs for myself, so I need to grasp ALL these concepts immensely. Thanks for your guys' help and I appreciate it greatly. Peace.
#23
Scales boring? Dude its all jamming and coming up with your own riffs.

Pauldapro, some people will tell you theory etc will ruin your individual style. Screw that. Every good guitarist out there knows theory, whether they know they do or not. Scales, forming chords, its all part of music theory. Music theory is basically gives you the ability to know which chords/scales/keys etc will go well together.

In terms of learning chords, I think you should learn triads and the positions certain chords are in off each root note so that you can play chords all over the fretboard with one position per string.

Cheers.
#24
Make sure that you don't just try to learn music theory as a one-shot, all-inclusive concept. Learn the basics first, like keys, intervals, note naming, major/minor chord construction, etc. and then as you keep playing, you'll need to learn some more slightly advanced concepts (such as extended or suspended chords and modes) as you try to work them into your playing.
#25
Don't try to learn one thing at one time. Barre chords aren't any fun when you start and they will hurt. Scales are a part of music theory. Arpeggios is also a part of music theory, and you should first learn how chords work before getting into that. So don't learn on thing at a time, learn a bit of this, a bit of that. It will all tie in better that way I think. Also, trying learning some new techniques here and there.

Also, whoever said scales and theory is boring and that you shouldn't learn them should be shot. There is a reason why music theory exists, and if you want to consider yourself a musician of any kind, you should know music theory.
"I've been visiting a psychiatrist for some time now. He plays mind games. He asks things like 'do you masturbate'? and I say 'do you breathe?'."
Ozzy - 1975
#26
I've already learned that barre chords are pretty easy, it's just the pain that kinda bothers me. I think I'm learning barre chords at a pretty good pace, so I think it would be a wise choice to go into music theory because that stuff seems really useful in songwriting. I do plan to write songs, just not really for fame or anything. More like proving myself that I can do a good song and stuff.
#27
Quote by Salemsmommy
Amazing advice and info. Thank you so much. Again I copied this so I can really try to study and understand what you are saying.
Your time in posting this is MUCH appreciated. Cool profile btw!!!

Just look up some tabs of nice simple songs you like and give them a go. Thats what i did. I just kept trying different songs all the time, you learn lots of techniques that way. You could take the boring route of just going on tutorial after tutorial until you have some basics down then try some songs after, up to you i guess.
#28
Quote by Pauldapro
I only know the A minor pentatonic scale, and to me, it's not really boring to practice. Maybe I'm a masochist, but I like messing around with it. So here's a list of what I think I should learn and correct me if I'm missing anything or something seems out of place on the list:

Before the list that I should learn: Better picking

1. Barre chords
2. Music Theory
3. Scales (hard to decide which one should be learned first between theory and scales, because they're both vastly important, and I suck at decisions)
4. Arpeggios

This is it right now. This is probably going to keep me busy for a while, besides, I need to put this TO USE for making songs for myself, so I need to grasp ALL these concepts immensely. Thanks for your guys' help and I appreciate it greatly. Peace.

Something I learned about the minor pentatonic scale when I looked it up in 2 different keys: The box formations are all the same for each key, just on different places on the fretboard. Just figure out which patterns go into one spot and the rest fall into place.
#29
Quote by Sevenfoldizm
Something I learned about the minor pentatonic scale when I looked it up in 2 different keys: The box formations are all the same for each key, just on different places on the fretboard. Just figure out which patterns go into one spot and the rest fall into place.


+1, if you've learnt A minor Pentatonic, why not move it up two frets so that it becomes B minor Pentatonic?

You can just move it up and down the fretboard, so that the root note changes but the scale doesnt. It's the beauty of stringed instruments, patterns are easily transposed.
...
#30
Hiring bartdevil_metal For private lessons lol!
Ok, where can I find good strum exercises?? Remember to please talk to me like I am 5 when it comes to guitars lol.
Hey, I can't even get Kumbayah Right yet!
sniff.
Newbie guitar player and do my fingers hurt!
#32
Thank you again!!! Youre fast!
Newbie guitar player and do my fingers hurt!
#33
I had precisely the same thought the other week, when I was playing the same stuff I'd been playing since I first picked up the guitar just over a month ago. But in the end, it's not what you can play that matters, it's how you play it. Example, the only basic solos I know are Knights of Cydonia by Muse, Chasing Cars by Snow Patrol and Summer of 69 by Bryan Adams. The only advanced solo I know is Sweet Child O' Mine, and I mean I know everything that Slash plays in that song except for the ending solo... that just laughs in my face and says "You'll be that good in a few decades pal!"

But yeah. Basically, I can play all of those songs really well. Infact, learning songs isn't proving professionalism either. Like everyone else said (I'm just going to echo it because it is important), learn scales, power chords etc. Particularly the pentatonic scale. That proves a great asset to guitar learning. Oh, and once you've learned how to hammer-on and pull-off, try learning fingertapping, it's a really easy-to-learn method of playing and it's a good way to show off

Hope this helped. Most likely not, it's just me explaining about how I learned things :P
#34
I am sure your post will help me as soon as I look up a few words in it lol. I plan on coming back to these posts often. Are you teaching yourself? Instructor?? Where did you start? Thanks!
Newbie guitar player and do my fingers hurt!
#35
Quote by Big_Rat
Just look up some tabs of nice simple songs you like and give them a go. Thats what i did. I just kept trying different songs all the time, you learn lots of techniques that way.


That's exactly what I did, and not one step of my guitar playing journey has been boring at all. In fact after 8+ months I still play at least 7+ hours everyday playing covers, writing my own and learning new things. Once you get down most of the techniques, get stronger hands etc, the theory is much easier to deal with, because you can immediately apply it to your guitar and see how it works. Plus with more songs memorized or sort of memorized you'll be able to understand how theory took part in their songs too.

IMO this is the best way to go. Don't worry too much about theory right now or you will be overwhelmed and guitar will become much less fun.

EDIT: One thing I would reccommend spending some time learning is the 12 bar blues, because you can go jam with anyone better than you and it makes you seem like you know what you're doing. I've been doing it for several months and only about a month ago realized why it works, how it works etc.
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meh, I've listened to every radiohead album and honestly don't get what everyone loves about them.....


cause you're ****ing stupid

Last edited by 3holepunch at Feb 13, 2008,
#36
Do you have a link maybe for the 12 bar blues? Again thank you so very much. Acutally my fingers are toughing up! I really don't want to move to far ahead until I can play the cords with NO mistakes. Like D major and F...I tend to mute some strings. It is driving me nuts but working on it.
Newbie guitar player and do my fingers hurt!