#1
ok i have a question, thanks to the internets i have a new area of guitar to explore as of late... fusion/jazz players... i know some of the favs are greg howe, shawn lane, etc.... my question is how can i take my knowledge and start to add elements of fusion into the mix...
i've found that i'm getting kinda bored of my own licks when im playing... if i could learn how to add a fusion/jazz flavour to my playing i might get out of this slump i've recently run into
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#2
Try jamming along to jazz tracks. You'll quickly discover that your classic blues/pentatonic based soloing sounds pretty bad. This will basically make you start from scratch and build a repertoire of good sounding jazz licks.
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#3
Quote by Galvanise69
If fusion doesnt use pentatonic scales, what scales does it usually use to build a fusion sound?


The next person to ask "what scales does jazz use" gets put on "the list".
Jazz is one of the most theoretically complex and diverse genres on the planet, and ignoring the fact that most jazz doesn't make use of scales in the traditional sense, the areas of jazz that do use them use just about every scale imaginable.
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#4
You can have a fusion sound with pentatonics.

Alternate uses of the pentatonic over chords can get you to hit the interesting notes. this article by beat might help: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=132752&highlight=pentatonics

One thing I've been considering lately is that, if you have an alt chord (or want to play outside over a dominant) play the minor pentatonic a minor third up from the root. So, say we do that over C alt, we're playing Eb (enharmonic #9) Gb (b5) Ab (b6, or #5) Bb (b7) and Db (b9). So, you can use the pentatonic shape, but you're hitting all the altered tones and the b7! Look for examples like this where the pentatonic can be used in alternate ways.

Another thing is to actually alter your approach to playing the actual pentatonic scale. Rather than scalar runs, try using fourth or fifth intervals in your playing (some sweep picking or finger picking would probably help, as these are rather large intervals to fret on one string. But it can be done). Using different intervals will give the pentatonic a new sound, one that might fit more in a fusion environment.
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#5
^The fun part about Eb min penta over C7 chords is that you can make godly sequences with them. You can go as far as playing Amin penta over C7 and play a lick there. After, do the same lick 3 frets up (in Cmin penta), after another 3 frets up in Ebmin penta! After, you 'might' want to do it again, depending on the lick because the min penta another 3 frets up is a bit too harsh in some cases. But of course, because we're sequencing, it might just work!

Total hell with min penta's over dominants!
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#6
Quote by Archeo Avis
The next person to ask "what scales does jazz use" gets put on "the list".
Jazz is one of the most theoretically complex and diverse genres on the planet, and ignoring the fact that most jazz doesn't make use of scales in the traditional sense, the areas of jazz that do use them use just about every scale imaginable.


Yeh i agree, its kinda anoying how people ask, what scales do i use? when really musicians dont think about what scale they are playin and they should be focusing on shaping a melody to actually fit the music instead of running up and down scales as if they are a computer or something.