#1
hi folks i was wondering if anyone out there knows of a site i could access that gives you a list of usable chords related to a key.when i say a list i mean a fairly extensive list not just for example E A B for the key of E etc.thanks would be great help.......keep playing
#2
Intervals of the major scale: 1 2 3-4 5 6 7-8, space means whole step, - means half step.

So in the key of C, that makes: C D E-F G A B-C

The 2 and 3 and 6 are minor chords, so we get C Dm Em F G Am Bdim.

If you put it in D instead of C, you have the same intervals. But you have to start on D instead. We get: D E F G A B C D

But we have to keep the half steps in the same place. So we have to raise a few notes to get the same sound. So we have to make it D E F# G A B C# D.

The 2, 3 and 6 are still minor, so D Em F#m G A Bm C#dim.

It's very mathematical at first, but you'll get it in time.
#3
cheers for that much appreciated,do those same intervals apply to the minor key
#4
Depends on how you see it. The natural minor scale is: 1 2-3 4 5 6-7 8. So in the key of Cm, that would be C D Eb F G A Bb C. But here's the deal: Every minor key has a major parallel, with the exact same notes and chords. And if you play in the key of C, the minor parallel is Am (the sixth chord in the key). Play in D and it's Bm, play in E and it's C#m. So let's say you're playing in Em (typical guitar key), it has the same notes and chords as G major. If you go six notes up from G you get E. It's pretty simple once you get the basics of it.

That's why you can improvise in the Em scale over the key of G major. It's really the same exact same key.
#5
major scales are made of 2 tetra-chords, the pattern in a tetra-chord is whole step whole step,half step, then a whole step between the tetra-chords,(btw tetra-chorda re made up of 4 notes) scales are 8 notes. to make any sclae a pure minor scale, lower the 3rd, the 6th, and ther 7th,
to make is a harmonic minor just lower the 3rd and 6th,
(btw forgot the mention when i say lower, i mean a half-step)
#6
Aziraphale

If you put it in D instead of C, you have the same intervals. But you have to start on D instead. We get: D E F G A B C D


ME:

no that is incorrect that scale is D in the dorian mode

the d major scale is:

D E F# G A B C# D
song stuck in my head today


#7
Quote by Aziraphale
Depends on how you see it. The natural minor scale is: 1 2-3 4 5 6-7 8. So in the key of Cm, that would be C D Eb F G A Bb C. But here's the deal: Every minor key has a major parallel, with the exact same notes and chords. And if you play in the key of C, the minor parallel is Am (the sixth chord in the key). Play in D and it's Bm, play in E and it's C#m. So let's say you're playing in Em (typical guitar key), it has the same notes and chords as G major. If you go six notes up from G you get E. It's pretty simple once you get the basics of it.

That's why you can improvise in the Em scale over the key of G major. It's really the same exact same key.



they are not the same key they are harmonically identical. there construction is different and if you are just learning these things you need to understand that they are not the same thing.
song stuck in my head today


#8
D dorian

D E F G A B C D is considered a minor mode because it has a ftattened 3rd. it also has a flattened 7th. it would more than likely be played witha minor chord.

D minor triad
intervals 1 b3 5
notes D F A

it is not in the key of C maj

C D E F G A B C

c maj triad
intervals 1 3 5
notes C E G

do you see the difference??
song stuck in my head today


#9
Quote by dave400
hi folks i was wondering if anyone out there knows of a site i could access that gives you a list of usable chords related to a key.when i say a list i mean a fairly extensive list not just for example E A B for the key of E etc.thanks would be great help.......keep playing


The circle of fifths is the easy way to remember chords in a key -

Bb F C G D A E B

^ observe, that for the tonic C, the three major chords in the key (F, C, G) are centered on it. The 3 minor chords in the key (D, A, E) are directly adjacent, centered on the relative minor. The diminished (the 7th) is left past the minor chords. Note that they follow an order of "modal brightness" in which the customary major and minor keys are centered.

This works anywhere in the circle, obviously, although you have to remember to use enharmonics where appropriate (G# isn't shown on most circles because it isn't a used key but it's the relative minor of B major, not Ab)
#10
can you eleborate on what you mean by modal brightness???
song stuck in my head today


#11
Lydian is a "brighter" sound than Ionian, but it's a very bad word. I was going to not mention it but kept it.

So much emphasis is placed on modes but their practical application is limited. They really should be avoided until much later in a player's development.