#1
So my high school offers a Music Theory class [ and i need the fine arts credit to get out of high school ]. And i was wondering if all Music Theory classes cover the same thing? Like is There more than one music theory? Because im so Lost...
#2
Pretty much, theory is theory. You'll start simple with things like scales and intervals, work towards chord types, etc. and go up from there. No matter which direction you go in, the first and most critical building blocks pretty much have to come first.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#5
Ya they pretty much cover everything, im taking one right now. we started with the notes on the different clefs, then moved on to scales, intervals, chords, ect. like axemanchris said, theory is theory
#6
As mentioned, it covers the basics of rhythmic patterns, timing, note value, some scales and chords, etc. Hopefully your teacher is a good one, because the one i had in high school sucked at teaching, i learned absolutely nothing for the whole year.
#7
Yea i guess ill take it. Cause i need the credit to graduate and it beats the hell out of art class...Lol.
#8
Quote by JessicaGonzo
Like is There more than one music theory?

for your purposes no, but in reality there are. for example, the way Indians make ragas and the use of taqsim theory in arab music differs greatly from Western music theory (that's what your being taught, at least i'm 99.99999999% sure). there's more systematic ways to make music, too. take Schoenberg's serialism or Bailey's non-idiomatic improvisation. there's aleatoric music. there's systems to non-Western choral music (Byzantine, Armenian, Assyrian, etc.). there's also musique concrete. the list goes on and on. the truth is there's so many ways to make music that if you're not into the Western traditional theoretic approach, you don't have to use it!

but in your case, all high schools teach the same Western music theory. sorry for the rant, tho.

'tis life
#9
Quote by Gabuydachk

but in your case, all high schools teach the same Western music theory. sorry for the rant, tho.




CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
I am currently taking Music Theory I, but was pleased to discover my school offers Music Theory II O_O That's twice as many as I thought! Anyways, I highly recommend the class, especially if you are just starting out your musical journey, which is sure to be a long, frustrating, although pleasant path. Ours started with a semester of Music Reading, which dealt mainly in, you guessed it, reading the notation and note lengths. Music Theory is the practical application of all the glorious knowledge man has uncovered in the past few centuries. I will say that you should go in with an open mind and ask questions, because our school's curriculum focuses mostly on classical and western music, and doesn't teach it in 'new age' format. Have fun with it!
#11
Music theory is good to know, and you will have someone there to help you out. I never learned theory by a class. I used the internet to learn all i know.
#12
Music Theory was the best class in High School. Take it, and you will learn so much.
Quote by Mazzakazza
Play Meshuggah. It is the solution.
#13
im taking it to next year. but my schools music theory is just music theory. there is no specific instruments so what will they teach?
#14
my school teaches:

4 part harmony
chord construction
sulfeggio
melodic dictation
rythmic dictation
musical terms
circle of fiths

and more i just cant name them all

07 Fender American Deluxe Strat
07 Fender Custom Telecaster
09 Seymour Duncan Pickup Booster
09 Fulltone OCD V.4
10 Ibanez WH-10 V.2
09 Splawn SuperStock
10 Jet City JCA-20
97 Fender Hot Rod Deluxe

Yeh the SICK! bit sounds a bit stupid.

#15
My class follows a workbook series called, "Master Theory" by Charles S. Peters & Paul Yoder. It isn't bad, but it doesn't go into amazing detail and history on most stuff. But it provides a base of knowledge which you can build off of.