#1
I've learnt how to read music, but as to where to start playing on the fretboard I am finding quite difficult, so can anyone help me out. For example if I have a G where do I play it? I know where middle C is notated, so I start in relation to that (somewhat, but it often doesn't work out).

If I have open chords, would playing it in relation to that be right?

Thanks in advance.
Are you reelin' in the years?
#2
The middle C would be the 8th fret on the low E string (3rd on A, etc)

If you have powertab or guitarpro, you could type in all the frets on all the strings on the tabulature side and get what they would be in standard notation
#3
I thought that middle C was the 3rd fret of the A string. Either way, there are so many G's I don't know where to start, also, the chords that are used are all 1st position open chords. I also don't have guitar pro.
Are you reelin' in the years?
#4
Quote by oldfartatplay
I've learnt how to read music, but as to where to start playing on the fretboard I am finding quite difficult, so can anyone help me out. For example if I have a G where do I play it? I know where middle C is notated, so I start in relation to that (somewhat, but it often doesn't work out).

If I have open chords, would playing it in relation to that be right?

Thanks in advance.

look at the treble clef there should be sharps or flats beside it indicating what key the music is played in.

you start in relation to the key

but i don't know where to start each key lol. basically cause tis played all over the fret board
song stuck in my head today


Last edited by lbc_sublime at Feb 6, 2008,
#5
Quote by oldfartatplay
I've learnt how to read music, but as to where to start playing on the fretboard I am finding quite difficult, so can anyone help me out. For example if I have a G where do I play it? I know where middle C is notated, so I start in relation to that (somewhat, but it often doesn't work out).

If I have open chords, would playing it in relation to that be right?

Thanks in advance.


It depends on which G too. Second line G? Top space above the top line? Below the second ledger line below the staff? Four ledger lines above the staff?

And, oh yes, the possibilities. Second line G can be played in four different places on the guitar. Space above the top line G can be played in 5 different places on the guitar.



CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#6
The middle C would be the 8th fret on the low E string (3rd on A, etc)


This is Guitar middle C, but it is not middle C middle C. If you wanted to play a piano piece, for example, you should really play everything an octave upwards. Trumpets and stuff are weirder then that, so it's something to be aware of(although you could ignore it if you're playing alone).

The rule of thumb I follow is to always try and stay in the middle of the fretboard, unless I have reason to do otherwise. That way you should be able to handle most ascents and descents. It really comes down to experience and preference, being able to predict whats going to happen in the music and the best fingerings for that.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transposing_instrument
#7
Quote by axemanchris
It depends on which G too. Second line G? Top space above the top line? Below the second ledger line below the staff? Four ledger lines above the staff?

And, oh yes, the possibilities. Second line G can be played in four different places on the guitar. Space above the top line G can be played in 5 different places on the guitar.



CT


Thanks for the replies so far, but say it is on the 2nd line ledger, would knowing what key the song in help finding the positioning on the board?
Are you reelin' in the years?
#8
Uhh... I don't know if this will help, but I do it by knowledge of the open strings, octave intervals, and the intervals between certain frets and their open strings. And intervals between strings. Sorry if I'm not being clear here; it's really just a combination of things.

On a piano, you would play the 2nd line G as the G right above middle C. But on a guitar, everything is notated an octave higher than it really is, so that same G would be the third fret on the high E string. (I'm pretty sure of this, but correct me if I'm wrong.)

Keys don't really matter in finding individual notes. You just have to know the entire fretboard, and be able to navigate intervals easily.
#9
If you could tell me where to start for the G in regrds to where it is placed on the ledger line, it would be a great start for me. Eg, low G, where could you play it?
Are you reelin' in the years?
#10
Quote by oldfartatplay
I've learnt how to read music, but as to where to start playing on the fretboard I am finding quite difficult, so can anyone help me out. For example if I have a G where do I play it? I know where middle C is notated, so I start in relation to that (somewhat, but it often doesn't work out).


Notation on guitar is usually written an octave above how it sounds ie. the note written as middle C on a staff is the lowest C on a guitar in standard tuning (low E 8th fret, A string 3rd fret. The G on the second line of a staff is the same as the open G string and can also be found at the 15th fret on the low E, 10th fret on the A and 5th fret on the D.
Last edited by Eirien at Feb 10, 2008,
#11
Quote by oldfartatplay
If you could tell me where to start for the G in regrds to where it is placed on the ledger line, it would be a great start for me. Eg, low G, where could you play it?

3rd fret on 6th string.
#12
1: read the key signature at the start of the music .
2: learn the scale which relates to the key .(by note name as well as shape on the neck )
do this in open position i.e no note should go past fret 4, aim to be fluent, prompt and of course accurate !
#13
Guitar transposition - the guitar plays an octave lower than written.

Example: Middle C is one ledger line below the staff. Play it on guitar = fifth string, third fret. Match that up with the exact pitch on piano, and you'll find yourself playing the C below middle C on the piano.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#14
Thanks for the help, but it is still slightly confusing, are there any websites that help with this sort of stuff?
Are you reelin' in the years?
#15
Quote by capiCrimm
It really comes down to experience and preference, being able to predict whats going to happen in the music and the best fingerings for that.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transposing_instrument


+1

takes time and alot of pratice
Feelin the Blues


"The Blues are a simple music and I'm a simple man. But the Blues aren't a science, the Blues can't be broken down like a mathematics. The Blues are a mystery, and mysteries are never as simple as they look" - BB King