#1
hey fellow theory buffs. i've been working on solidifying my interval-based theory knowledge, and i've been wondering about something in the grey area between chord progressions and modal scales...

i know that modal music sounds best over one and two-chord vamps, but what i've been wondering is this:

is there an interval-based pattern that explains which chord extensions (sus2, sus4, maj7, etc etc) will imply a certain mode in their melody? An practical example would be that i want to write a progression in E minor, but one that has a very Dorian sound to it...

i guess, in a strange way, i'm wondering if there's a formula to write progressions using modes as keys. A song in the key of E dorian, i guess...
#2
Yes. Read the sticky.

Modal music isn't the same as key based music. Diatonic sets of notes will naturally gravitate towards the relative major or minor, which means that complex chord progressions will be modally ambiguous as they try to resolve elsewhere. Modal music generally use simple progressions consisting of one or two chords.
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#3
I think technically, it isn't call E dorian. But i haven't the knowledge, like yourself. But I wouldn't think so. You could probably say, yeah it's in E dorian, but essentially it'd be what, Dmajor?


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#4
Quote by Mattalac
I think technically, it isn't call E dorian. But i haven't the knowledge, like yourself. But I wouldn't think so. You could probably say, yeah it's in E dorian, but essentially it'd be what, Dmajor?


No, it wouldn't. D major is completely different from E dorian.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#5
Quote by Archeo Avis
No, it wouldn't. D major is completely different from E dorian.

+1

Also, to emphasize the Dorian tonality, one must emphasise what is different. Dorian differs from the natural minor, only by its major sixth, which replaces the minor sixth. Therefore, the sixth should be emphasised. Using Em6 as your tonic, will imply dorian.
#6
Quote by Archeo Avis
Yes. Read the sticky.

Modal music isn't the same as key based music. Diatonic sets of notes will naturally gravitate towards the relative major or minor, which means that complex chord progressions will be modally ambiguous as they try to resolve elsewhere. Modal music generally use simple progressions consisting of one or two chords.


i read that sticky before you joined the site.

anyways, the reason i posted is that the sticky doesn't say anything along the lines of:

to emphasize the dorian mode, play 6th chords on the 6th degree... or anything like that.

i know modal progressions are ambiguous and that it's definitely not the standard way to write stuff, but i was just curious as to whether or not there IS a rule that dictates how to write complex chords with one mode in mind, but more than a two-chord vamp, like with an Em6 to imply dorian.... are there more "rules" that can expand that chord progression to still constantly imply one mode?