#1
I am currently learning my modes and doing exercises to help me remember them but I am have a hard time trying to solo and improvise with them. I am fine making riffs and little melody lines here and there with them but when it comes to actual soloing I just keep coming up with crap. I just made a simple backing track and am practicing improvising over it to really know my way around the modes I am using but is there anything else I could do?
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#2
I think it's important to think of the sound you want to make before you play it. This requires a good knowledge of intervals (not theory so much, but just how to make the sounds you want based on atmosphere, feel etc.) and phrasing. Phrasing is definitely important.
#3
Query: How are you using them?
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#4
^ What do you mean? I am basically using them to solo with.
"My strength is my determination" - Randy Rhoads (1956-1982)

Quote by LedZeppelin
Life is not an isolated moment, so don't live it as such.

Quote by bendystraw
art rock? isn't all rock art?
#5
He means, are you using them as scales? Are you using them as "boxes"? Or are you using them as modes?
Quote by marmoseti
Mastering your instrument is being able to play whatever you hear in your head, unhindered by inadequate technique. After that, it's all about what you've got to say, so there would be no "best," just a bunch of people saying exactly what they mean.
#6
Quote by Avedas
I think it's important to think of the sound you want to make before you play it. This requires a good knowledge of intervals (not theory so much, but just how to make the sounds you want based on atmosphere, feel etc.) and phrasing. Phrasing is definitely important.


i agree. and getting the idea of "playing what you hear in your head" down takes a crapload of practice... im not even halfway there personally.
#7
use chromatic passing notes in your solos. target the tension notes of the mode to make it sound. and use a variety of licks. just 3 notes can make a lot of licks. it's a matter of how you phrase
#8
Quote by HedBanger24/7
I am currently learning my modes and doing exercises to help me remember them but I am have a hard time trying to solo and improvise with them. I am fine making riffs and little melody lines here and there with them but when it comes to actual soloing I just keep coming up with crap. I just made a simple backing track and am practicing improvising over it to really know my way around the modes I am using but is there anything else I could do?


You'll get better eventually. Memorizing the modes is the step one, then you have to learn what mode corresponds to what chord. Also, training your ear is an important part when learning improvisation. So, sing and transcribe too!
#9
Quote by HedBanger24/7
^ What do you mean? I am basically using them to solo with.


How are you soloing with them? What kind of progressions are you using, and what modes are you using over them?
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#10
A question: can you sing improv well over a backing track?
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#11
I'm sure that you know the pentatonic scale by now, right? Have you ever tried improvising with that? I'm sure that at first it sounded like crap, and you may have thought that this was due to just a lack of technical skill. This may have been true, but it takes forever to get good at improvising.

But, I'd highly recommend recording your improvisations a bit. I just improvised while recording myself twice, and I hated each recording. I was sloppy, out of time in some spots, too much distortion, whatever. But I kept them anyway, though there was no real conscious reason for doing so. Now I listen to those two recordings and see that, though they're flawed, I really like what I did on them. I played some really cool licks just because of the atmosphere of the song.

So here's what I say you do, if you can record.

- Set up your backing track

- Play over said backing track

- Let this sit a few days, and then listen to it

- Don't listen to what you did wrong, but what you did right. When improvising, you're bound to drop a few clangers here and there, but you'll eventually settle all of that.
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#13
Make sure the scale you are using is the key of the rythm. Example - your rythm guitar is galloping on an F Power Chord - use the F scale on the traditional root on the 6th octaves. If it still sounds bad, try F scale root on the 5th octaves. Then just make sure you stay in the boundaries of the scale(s) you are using. It will come with time, don't worry, I had the same troubles and still do, but it gets easier. Keep Up the good work.

\m/
#14
^
Leaving the boundary of whatever scale you are playing in makes things interesting, though, pending on your rhythm. Sticking within the scale creates a box on something that has endless possibilities, which is one way of describing music in general -- having no boundaries.
Got Death Magnetic a day early!

The Low-Cardinal of Zeppelinism - If you're a diehard fan of Zeppelin, join Zeppelinism here


Winner of the "Biggest Led Zeppelin Fuck" award in the CR forum (2 years running!)
#15
Quote by ironman1207
Make sure the scale you are using is the key of the rythm. Example - your rythm guitar is galloping on an F Power Chord - use the F scale on the traditional root on the 6th octaves. If it still sounds bad, try F scale root on the 5th octaves. Then just make sure you stay in the boundaries of the scale(s) you are using. It will come with time, don't worry, I had the same troubles and still do, but it gets easier. Keep Up the good work.

\m/


I have no idea what you're talking about, but all scales cover the entire fretboard.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#16
Quote by ironman1207
Make sure the scale you are using is the key of the rythm. Example - your rythm guitar is galloping on an F Power Chord - use the F scale on the traditional root on the 6th octaves. If it still sounds bad, try F scale root on the 5th octaves. Then just make sure you stay in the boundaries of the scale(s) you are using. It will come with time, don't worry, I had the same troubles and still do, but it gets easier. Keep Up the good work.

\m/


What in the world are you talking about?
#17
Quote by Page&HammettFan
I'm sure that you know the pentatonic scale by now, right? Have you ever tried improvising with that? I'm sure that at first it sounded like crap, and you may have thought that this was due to just a lack of technical skill. This may have been true, but it takes forever to get good at improvising.

But, I'd highly recommend recording your improvisations a bit. I just improvised while recording myself twice, and I hated each recording. I was sloppy, out of time in some spots, too much distortion, whatever. But I kept them anyway, though there was no real conscious reason for doing so. Now I listen to those two recordings and see that, though they're flawed, I really like what I did on them. I played some really cool licks just because of the atmosphere of the song.

So here's what I say you do, if you can record.

- Set up your backing track

- Play over said backing track

- Let this sit a few days, and then listen to it

- Don't listen to what you did wrong, but what you did right. When improvising, you're bound to drop a few clangers here and there, but you'll eventually settle all of that.


+1
#18
um, im saying use a scale that goes along with the key the rythm guitar is in.

and yes i know, scales can be played all across the fretboard, but start with root on the 6th then work down to root on the 5th. most solos are played with roots on the 6th or 5th strings.
#19
well playing in key would be helpful, lol.

jesus christ these topics have gotten boring, same questions over and over again
#20
Quote by ironman1207
um, im saying use a scale that goes along with the key the rythm guitar is in.

and yes i know, scales can be played all across the fretboard, but start with root on the 6th then work down to root on the 5th. most solos are played with roots on the 6th or 5th strings.


The "root" is just a note. That note is found on every string.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#21
Quote by ironman1207
um, im saying use a scale that goes along with the key the rythm guitar is in.

and yes i know, scales can be played all across the fretboard, but start with root on the 6th then work down to root on the 5th. most solos are played with roots on the 6th or 5th strings.


Like Archeo said, the root is just a note. Where it is located doesn't matter