#1
Ok, so after lots of careful study of the major scale and its modes, i think i understand how they are used and when to use them. BUT, i just want to be sure so correct me if im wrong in any way please.

when using modes, i don't base song keys on them, i let the harmony, or chords behind the modes create the modes, and the key does not derive the mode, correct?

modes are scales, not shapes.

on can play the notes wherever i want, however i want, and even use accidentals to bring out the chords behind the modes, correct?
#2
Quote by linfield44
on can play the notes wherever i want, however i want, and even use accidentals to bring out the chords behind the modes, correct?


You pretty much hit the nail right on its head there.
Dissonance is Bliss


Signal Chain:
Carvin CT-4
Ibanez TS-9
Carvin Quad-X
TC Electronics G-Major
Mesa/Boogie 2:90
Ear Candy BuzzBomb



Member #4 of the Carvin Club
#4
You need to be more specific. How are you using them, exactly? Show me a chord progression and how you would play over it.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#5
Quote by Archeo Avis
You need to be more specific. How are you using them, exactly? Show me a chord progression and how you would play over it.



well, lets say if I had chord progression as such:

Cm Fmadd9 Gm Fm ...well, i guess that they don't have to be in any particular order

....but i could play C aeolian over those chords, right?
#6
Quote by linfield44
but i could play C aeolian over those chords, right?
Yup!

Aeolian doesn't have to be i iv v. In fact, the 5 chord is often major in a minor key (borrowed from haronic minor, ask be to explain if you want). A very common Aeolian progression would be Am F G, i VI VII.

However, how us something more unusual than just Aeolian, something like Lydian!
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Feb 7, 2008,
#7
Quote by linfield44
well, lets say if I had chord progression as such:

Cm Fmadd9 Gm Fm ...well, i guess that they don't have to be in any particular order

....but i could play C aeolian over those chords, right?


Yep. Just wanted to make sure that you weren't falling into the "switch modes over each chord" trap (e.g. ionian, lydian, and mixolydian over a I-IV-V progression)
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#8
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Yup!

But show us something more unusual than just Aeolian, something like Lydian!


ok F lydian....

F major 7, G major, C major 7, Am7add9
#9
^It might be the way I'm playing it, but that seems to want to resolve to C. When I got back to the F chord, I wanted to play G then C. This illustrates why modal progressions are hard. Try just playing chords with the #4 (B) in them, along with F.

I like it as a C progression, though.
#10
Quote by linfield44
ok F lydian....

F major 7, G major, C major 7, Am7add9


It's basically a IV-V-I progression. It very clearly resolves to C.
Modal progressions are generally simple, since their resolutions are very weak compares to the relative major/minor.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#11
^those chords aren't meant to be played in that particular order, and i didn't really get to play them on the guitar yet, i just sort of threw them down, so i could be wrong about it. looking at it though, it could use some tweaks
#12
i guess that i need to work on modes and progressions some more, but i appreciate the feedback
#13
Don't don't don't just throw chords from the parent scale together and just assume they will work for the modes. It most likely will not.


And don't double post!!!!!!oneoneoneeleven