#1
Well, I recently bought the Ibanez S470, which has the ZR tremolo and the Zero Point system. However, I read that you can remove the Zero Point system in order to make the ZR floating. So my question is basically: what will happen if I make it floating? What pros/cons will I get from it? Simply put, what is the difference between a regular trem and a floating trem?
Gear as 2015:
Ibanez PGM401
Music Man JP6 (for sale)
Music Man Axis (for sale)
Fender American Deluxe Stratocaster
Ibanez EW Acoustic Steel string
Crappy Cort Acoustic 12-string
NI Rig Kontrol 3 & Guitar Rig 5
#2
Quote by Joey Radical
Well, I recently bought the Ibanez S470, which has the ZR tremolo and the Zero Point system. However, I read that you can remove the Zero Point system in order to make the ZR floating. So my question is basically: what will happen if I make it floating? What pros/cons will I get from it? Simply put, what is the difference between a regular trem and a floating trem?



It's already a floating trem; regardless of the Zero Point system.


A floating trem basically means it can go up and down, which the ZR can.


Some people remove the ZP system because it gives the trem a looser fell when it's removed, although you might not want that.


I reckon it's best for you to stick with it for a while to see if you'd like it gone or not.
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#3
I'm not completely sure, but a floating trem is pretty much a floyd rose without the locking. In other words, it's easier to pull of. You can also create more of an effect and more flexibility (for lack of a better term). I would suggest a floating bridge over a regular. They are just flat out better in my opinion.
#4
Quote by fagelamusgtr
I'm not completely sure, but a floating trem is pretty much a floyd rose without the locking. In other words, it's easier to pull of. You can also create more of an effect and more flexibility (for lack of a better term). I would suggest a floating bridge over a regular. They are just flat out better in my opinion.



A regular, or vintage style trem, is one that sits on the body and can only go down.


A double locking bridge (which the ZR is) locks the string in two places: at the bridge and the nut.

A floating trem is a trem which is balanced by the string tension on one side and the spring tension on the other. They can go both up and down.
You've read it, you can't un-read it!