#1
mk

so i want to learn how to write some solos to throw in some songs here and there =]

ive looked all over the forums and couldnt find a good thread

what do i need to learn

i know little about scales, or really much about your "typical" writing techniques

so what scales do i need to learn?

and how do i use them to write?

help would be greatly appreciated =]
#2
Bassists dont solo. Only guitarists do.

(I REALLY don't mean that :p )
Anyways, Id play in key. See what you can do. Take the key of the song youre playing in and vary it up a bit. Just mess around using that scale and see what comes out of it. There is no set way to write a solo. Id just sit down with the bass and try. Hell, it helps if you have some chords or something in the background. It will help you improvise. Any licks you like that you play you should write down... at least, that's how I write solo's...
#3
yeah thats what i usually try to do and thats how i thought everyone did it

but my friend (who is a guitarist but its the same basic mechanics) uses all different kinds of scales and diagrams and stuff

i should probably mention that we typically play in drop-C
#4
Well, use all different types of scales! The only problem it sounds like you're having is picking the right scale to match your song. In theory, writing a guitar and bass solo are somewhat the same. In fact, if you like your guitarists solo's a lot, then ask him for advice!
#5
I would have to agree with everyone in here, but personally for rock or punk or anything, a Really technical bass solo isnt ALWAYS needed, sometimes it is, but in this one song i play with my band i have a bass solo and all i do is pick the root and the 5th in a certein rhythem and it sounds great. As for the drop C thing, you just gatta try to remember what notes are in the neck when your in Drop C that way you dont go out of key. Most bands usually use a natural minor scale, or a major scale, sometimes a dominant major scale, i would learn those and just like solo in those scales all over. I really dont know what to suggest though for really technical rock scales, i usually make my own solos for jazz and for rock i just keep it simple but fun.
#6
Two words: minor pentatonic.

A great way to get started is using the minor pentatonic scale. Make sure that whoever your playing with is playing minor chords though, or just use the major pentatonic. If you guys are playing in drop C, chances are you're playing a lot of power chords, at which point it doesn't really matter whether you use the minor or major pentatonic, but still, it's good to be aware of these things.
#7
The key to any great solo is to follow the changes and not have anyone notice you're following the changes. That is, if you have changes, if it's just a simple rock solo grab the minor pentatonic and riff away.
#8
yes know scales! that seems to be basic (and rather repeated!) but i'll give you some great advice! play along to the song, and at the moment you want to throw in a solo, start to just jam using the notes your already using, maybe go up an octave? but just wing it (not live) and if what you do there sounds about right, remember it then rework it until its exactly how you hear it in your head. thats how i do it, improve, remember, rework, perform... pretty straight forward.
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#9
In the ytse jam, John Myung starts with just going with the main riff only higher up the neck and uses a couple of different notes in it while doing that.

And than he just speeds up, hits a lot of notes from low to high on the neck and then starts tapping a couple of notes really fast


Don't know if that will help you
#10
if there is changes, figure out what note is different in them not what notes are the same

like say your going from F to C...the only difference there is the 7th...i think
which i think is E in F and E# in C

and find ways to manipulate other scales into your key.....
like a Cmaj7 scale is the same thing as a regular Fmaj

its all like that... the dominant 7th scale on the 5
note is in the same key as the scale that 5th is from


if that makes sence

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#11
Quote by Narcotics
if there is changes, figure out what note is different in them not what notes are the same

like say your going from F to C...the only difference there is the 7th...i think
which i think is E in F and E# in C

and find ways to manipulate other scales into your key.....
like a Cmaj7 scale is the same thing as a regular Fmaj

its all like that... the dominant 7th scale on the 5
note is in the same key as the scale that 5th is from


if that makes sence


It didn't and most of it was incorrect... The difference between Cmaj7 and Fmaj7 is the third of Fmaj7, which is A instead of E... But really, the root of Fmaj doesn't appear is C and the fifth of C nor the seventh of C fit in Fmaj. Really, they're not all too similar. C major is not the same thing as F major. F has a Bb in it. That last bit is correct though.
#12
I think a good time for a bass solo, if one is necessary is when the song kind of slows, like a bridge or interlude (or intro/outro for that matter, or in between parts of the song [prechorus/etc]) and play a rhythmic pattern that's in key and go around the scales and make it kinda funky.
#13
If you know some scales, play with them and see what melodies come out. What I mean is limit yourself to only the notes of the scale in the key of the song and experiment with patterns. Playing at a much slower tempo might help you hear what works and what doesn't.
Most great solos sound great no matter what tempo you're playing them at.