#1
I need help with being able to tap out or "hear" time signatures in my head. I can do 4/4 no problem, who can't? But anything else just gets too confusing for me. Anything simple, compound or asymmetrical, I can't begin to think of. Is there any way for me to think of patterns and drum beats in any kind of time signature?

And what exactly is the advantage to using different ones? More or less notes in a measure, sure, but is there anything else?
#2
Different time signatures have different feels. 3/4 time has a walz-like quality to it, for instance, that you wouldn't be able to get in 4/4.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#3
instead of counting to 4 for example in 4/4 time, 3/4 time is just counting to three, tri-pl-et, tri-pl-et, tri-pl-et. and whats Money by pink floyd in? 7/4? just count to seven.
using different time signatures can make songs more tense, or relaxing or whatever, it gives a different feel to it.
#4
Don't intentionally use another time signature. Just use it if something happens to come to you naturally. Forcing yourself to do something is not a good way to write music.
#5
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
Don't intentionally use another time signature. Just use it if something happens to come to you naturally. Forcing yourself to do something is not a good way to write music.


No but its a good way to learn music.
#6
Quote by deathpidgeon
3/4 time is just counting to three, tri-pl-et, tri-pl-et, tri-pl-et.
No it's not; that's 9/8. 3/4 is exactly the same feel as 4/4, with one less count per measure.
For these things give thanks at nightfall:The day gone, a guttered torch,A sword tested, the troth of a maid,Ice crossed, ale drunk.-The Hávamál
#7
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
Don't intentionally use another time signature. Just use it if something happens to come to you naturally. Forcing yourself to do something is not a good way to write music.


Actually, I've found that forcing some of my playing on odd time signatures, and other time signatures really stretch my creativity. I love to play in 7/8, and its a whole new universe to me. I have to adjust my playing from the good ol' common time to a new groove and feel. It offers a new challenge, and more inspiration. Playing in other time signatures is a humbling experience, and you learn alot about your playing. You learn alot about how you naturally adjust to things, and what you need to improve.
DANNY

Quote by kevinm4435 to some guy
hey d00d i herd u dont like shred u r a genius 4 thinkin dat. all shred is fukin lame wit no soul u no wat im sayin??
#8
No it's not; that's 9/8. 3/4 is exactly the same feel as 4/4, with one less count per measure.


That "one less count" completely changes the feel.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#9
The most important thing in time signatures is accents. Learn the proper rules for accents in complex time signatures, and you should be able to use them. Until you know how to accent in them, you will not be able to really get their distinct grooves.
#10
Quote by bluesrocker101
Actually, I've found that forcing some of my playing on odd time signatures, and other time signatures really stretch my creativity. I love to play in 7/8, and its a whole new universe to me. I have to adjust my playing from the good ol' common time to a new groove and feel. It offers a new challenge, and more inspiration. Playing in other time signatures is a humbling experience, and you learn alot about your playing. You learn alot about how you naturally adjust to things, and what you need to improve.


Point taken.
#11
Quote by Archeo Avis
That "one less count" completely changes the feel.
The quarter note feel, as opposed to the triplet feel.
For these things give thanks at nightfall:The day gone, a guttered torch,A sword tested, the troth of a maid,Ice crossed, ale drunk.-The Hávamál