#1
Aye well i've got asked to play for my countys junior jazz band thingy ;o and well i've not really done much jazz before. I can slap and pop but does anyone have any suggestions? I'm teaching myself to read sheet music and i can do that OK except if it modulates then i get a little confused but yeah any advice would be appreciated.
Last edited by rurii at Feb 9, 2008,
#2
Slap n' pop won't help you much in jazz; you need to be able to do a good walking bassline. Reading the music's a great start, but eventually you'll want to be able to improv a walking bassline. I still can't really do it that well (1-3-5-6-7-6-5-3 anyone?), but I'm getting better; my goal is to be able to walk smoothly by the end of the year.
#3
Don't expect to be able to walk too quickly. Walking takes a long time to master, and is one of those things that you can't truly be able to do on your own. The test is in a band situation. Anyway, the best thing to be able to do is sightread, sightread, sightread. Like a monster.
#4
Sightreading, and generally being able to follow and read sheet music will help you immensely, being comfortable with improvising in different jazz styles is important as well.
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#5
*hijack* This will probably sound ignorant or full of myself, but I assure you it's really the former not the latter: Why does everyone emphasize the difficulty of properly walking so much? I think I am missing some type of nuance to the method of playing that doesn't let me appreciate how difficult it can be. Is it just a matter of being original sounding with walking? Being dynamic enough to adapt to the other musicians (see I admitedly don't ever play a walking bass line with others so I really wouldn't know)?

To me it seems like a very basic and direct technique for playing and I don't think my little walks sound half bad(though obviously many better players can put in difficult flourishes etc.) Again, I'm being ignorent, not snooty or arrogent, so please give me a little info on this!

/hijack
#6
Learn chord structures. Knowing what notes make up an

Eb Major 7th

chord will help you being able to (a) write your own walking lines and (b) Be able to improvise a lot easier.

Also brush up on any and all music theory you can get your hands on. Be sure you and the drummer mesh. (On beats 2 and 4, you should be hitting the same time the drummer claps the high-hat) And always remeber to have fun with it!
#7
Try reading this: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=607576 and https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=653504 Both have information necessary for playing in a jazz band.

Quote by FbSa
Be sure you and the drummer mesh. (On beats 2 and 4, you should be hitting the same time the drummer claps the high-hat) And always remeber to have fun with it!


Only problem with being perfectly in time in jazz is that it doesn't swing as well. As long as you know where the beat should be just be slightly late on the 2 and 4. But being able to do that is damn hard
Founder of Jaco society

[22:08:23] <Confusius> I wish I was a bassist
[22:08:26] <Confusius> you fuckers look cool


Want to know how to play bass in jazz? Read this.
Last edited by sinan90 at Feb 9, 2008,
#8
Quote by sinan90
Try reading this: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=607576 and https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=653504 Both have information necessary for playing in a jazz band.


Only problem with being perfectly in time in jazz is that it doesn't swing as well. As long as you know where the beat should be just be slightly late on the 2 and 4. But being able to do that is damn hard


being slightly late can be extremely helpful when you need to hold the band back, like on some Basie, but if you have a faster song, sometimes you need that drive, and its a bit of a difficult transition, to keep slightly ahead of the band. I agree what you're saying for the most part though
#9
Everyone's given some great advice, but I'll add just one more. Learn the head (melody). This will help you get your playing around what sounds good sonically with the melody and how you can best support it.

And remember you are a rhythm instrument in jazz; so sometimes less is more. Don't over play your part.
#10
Quote by Zar938
being slightly late can be extremely helpful when you need to hold the band back, like on some Basie, but if you have a faster song, sometimes you need that drive, and its a bit of a difficult transition, to keep slightly ahead of the band. I agree what you're saying for the most part though



Even on the quicker pieces you need to make the 2 and 4 slightly later to make it really swing hard. Then to give the drive slight anticipation on the 1. Without a slight lag on the 2 and 4 you won't swing as hard, and swinging hard is the name of the game.
Founder of Jaco society

[22:08:23] <Confusius> I wish I was a bassist
[22:08:26] <Confusius> you fuckers look cool


Want to know how to play bass in jazz? Read this.
#11
Quote by dullsilver_mike
*hijack* This will probably sound ignorant or full of myself, but I assure you it's really the former not the latter: Why does everyone emphasize the difficulty of properly walking so much? I think I am missing some type of nuance to the method of playing that doesn't let me appreciate how difficult it can be. Is it just a matter of being original sounding with walking? Being dynamic enough to adapt to the other musicians (see I admitedly don't ever play a walking bass line with others so I really wouldn't know)?

To me it seems like a very basic and direct technique for playing and I don't think my little walks sound half bad(though obviously many better players can put in difficult flourishes etc.) Again, I'm being ignorent, not snooty or arrogent, so please give me a little info on this!

/hijack


The difficult parts of walking are this: when you walk, you need to be aware of all chord tones at all times and how those chord tones and passing tones will take you to the next chord; you need to be able to keep it original for 10, 15, 20 choruses, all of which could be 12 or 16 bars, maybe shifting the changes around a couple times or, even harder, never. You need to realize the difficulty of walking isn't in the technique, it's in the musicality. The reason you think your little walks sound good is a) you're doing short walks that you can keep sounding good and not get lost in, or b) you have not played them with any chordal instrument (you haven't) and you can't hear how bad they would truly sound behind a chord structure.
#12
I'm in my school's jazz band and sheet reading skills are a MUST! Be ready to read tons of accidentals (sharps and flats outside the key signature). Be able to swing it!
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Last edited by Metalology at Feb 9, 2008,
#13
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
The difficult parts of walking are this: when you walk, you need to be aware of all chord tones at all times and how those chord tones and passing tones will take you to the next chord; you need to be able to keep it original for 10, 15, 20 choruses, all of which could be 12 or 16 bars, maybe shifting the changes around a couple times or, even harder, never. You need to realize the difficulty of walking isn't in the technique, it's in the musicality. The reason you think your little walks sound good is a) you're doing short walks that you can keep sounding good and not get lost in, or b) you have not played them with any chordal instrument (you haven't) and you can't hear how bad they would truly sound behind a chord structure.


K, thanks for the insight jazz.