#1
I can understand why people want to be a 'leader' in a band, and I understand the need for one.. but I cannot understand why people automatically assume that I want this role.

My band at the moment has had a few problems with this issue.. and it'll probably never get resolved. But people tend to resent me when I assume this mantle. SO.. my question is how does your band operate.. who is the leader and are you happy with that choice? I think it's a lot of responsibilty to put on one person, IMHO.
#2
If we have a leader, I suppose it's me, as I'm the guy that all our bookings go through and organise stuff like poster design and printing and our annual festival Quazfest.
I never asked for the role but it's just how things have worked out over the past few years.
I make sure that any major decisions go through the entire band and everybody gets their point of view heard, then we vote on it.
I don't mind being the guy that does it, someone has to and I'm a stickler for details so the rest of the guys trust me to sort stuff out. I think it's a case of, if you do it yourself, you know it's been sorted out properly.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Feb 9, 2008,
#3
I am the leader, I organize practice and have a "dominating personality" and I also write 80% of our songs. I think it needs to be 1 person, so everyone is always on the same page, and you're either good at it or not. I'd suggest sounding more sure of yourself. Exude confidence but acknowledge what's going on and how to improve things.
#4
I book shows, brought most of the group together, used to schedule practices (now it's on a set date; less stress!), make flyers, run the band's MySpace (more important than it sounds), sign up for recording time, and I basically speak for the band whenever we are offered to play a show or something like that.

It gets hard sometimes, but the sense of pride is...it's just priceless.

Damn, I'm deep today...
#5
Quote by SSDDPunkRocker
I book shows, brought most of the group together, used to schedule practices (now it's on a set date; less stress!), make flyers, run the band's MySpace (more important than it sounds), sign up for recording time, and I basically speak for the band whenever we are offered to play a show or something like that.

It gets hard sometimes, but the sense of pride is...it's just priceless.

Damn, I'm deep today...

Yeah, I'd agree with that. It's that pride in your achievments that's the reward for the work you put into it. But it can also be for the same reason that you feel personaly insulted when a band member lets you down.
#6
My band's an oligarchy, I guess... myself and the drummer are really in charge, but the bassist has a pretty good deal of input. The other guitarist never talks, though, so he just plays what we tell him to. I love being one of the "leaders", since I have an enormous ego and need to get credit for stuff.
#7
No real leader
If somebody doesn't agree, the band doesn't agree.
A direct democracy we call it
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Last edited by cortez0 at Feb 10, 2008,
#8
we tried being a 'democracy', but.. well.. we ended up getting nothing done. Obviously, when it comes to big decisions like a new member or spending a lot of money, then it's a 'band decision', but things like running practice and myspace, and gigs, writing the majority of the songs, and so on, that falls on my head.
#9
In my band the work is divided; I take care of booking the studio we rehearse in and when we jam, the other guitar player takes care of spreading the word, our bassist takes care of managing the money. Everything else like songwriting, getting booked in gigs, etc, is a band effort.
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#10
Dont choose a leader or label yourself as one. It'll just cause problems with bandmates. You should be able to tell who the leader is without having to ask.
#11
In the old line up, I was definitely the leader and main songwriter. After the guitar player left, I switched to guitar. The drummer and kept practicing together and we eventually found another guitar player and a bass player to jam with. The other guitar player seemed to naturally take the leader role. It's kind of hard to go from the leader to a more secondary role.
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#12
Appointing a leader ****s up a band big time. Usually one guy will just sort of slip into the position of booking gigs and whatever else, but NEVER appoint anyone, nothign but problems.
#13
Someone said something along the lines of, "wait until the band finish playing through a song in rehearsal. See the guy they all turn to look at? That's the leader." In a similar thread a while ago. I thought that was comically sharp.
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#14
Mans theres a gazillion threads on this.

Couple bands ago I was invited over for practice to kinda audition for these guys and by the end of the practice I think I had permantely taken over. Im generally the leader of the band but Im very lucky right now because our newest member has glady taken some of the work and life is roses at the moment.

Anyways. Everybody from time to time gets bent at the leader because your the one that makes the decisions and that can cause strife occasionally.

However when something messy needs to take place like forcing the issue of how much you should get paid for a gig or firing a member suddenly your golden again lol.

Just because someone wants to be a leader shouldnt make it so. Keeping the band on track, dealing with problems before they actually become problems and to keep a band moving forward from a music and personal aspect helps create a good leader.


Quote by SlackerBabbath
Yeah, I'd agree with that. It's that pride in your achievments that's the reward for the work you put into it. But it can also be for the same reason that you feel personaly insulted when a band member lets you down.


Preach it brother. It can be a true test of ones pride.
Last edited by v8ko at Feb 11, 2008,
#15
Quote by freshtunes
Appointing a leader ****s up a band big time. Usually one guy will just sort of slip into the position of booking gigs and whatever else, but NEVER appoint anyone, nothign but problems.

Yeah, I see what you're saying, it's the 'appointing' of a leader itself that's the problem, not the fact that one person will eventualy naturaly take on the 'leader' mantle. But if no one seems to be taking that roll naturaly, then someone does need to be chosen in order to make the team work efficiently. But that's nothing to do with what the band actualy play, just how the business side of a band is run.
My personal opinion is that band members should all be on an equal footing as far as the band's music is concerned. But then, I'm in a band where everyone is equaly experienced music wise. In a band where one person has a lot more experience than the rest, it may be an idea for everyone to listen to that guy as he will have more of an idea of what he's talking about than everyone else. But that doesn't neccessarily mean that he should automaticaly be the band's 'business' leader too.

It really is just a case of getting organised and finding the best way for your own particular collection of egos (or... band) to operate productively, and any group of people operates most efficiently when one person pulls the strings. That's why armies have generals and countries have prime ministers and presidents.
But this ONLY works correctly if everyone is happy with the person who has taken the roll as band leader.
The most important role for a band leader I can think of is delegation.
Everyone has something else they can bring to the table apart from their musical skills.
As a band leader, it's important that you find out what these additional skills are and delegate jobs that you feel they can handle without screwing up.
(I know this sounds like I'm treating the band like a bunch of kids that can't look after themselves, and it's true, to a cirtain extent, I am, because that way, stuff gets done and it gets done properly)
F'rinstance, my own role in Slack Babbath is the bookings guy. I take the bookings as they come in, write them in the diary and make sure that we don't get double booked. If we need any rehearsal for a gig, I delegate the drummer, who's good friends with the local club owner (where we rehearse) to organise rehearsal time for us.
Then if we need to hire transport for the gig, I delegate the guitarist to organise this as he is also the band's general driver and it'll probably be him that's driving whatever we hire.
I get any poster designs organised myself, (my wife is a graphics designer) but then delegate our guitarist to print them out because he has access to a good quality (and above all else 'cheap') printer where he works.
Our bass player acts as a gopher, (y'know, go for this, go for that) because he has a reliable car that's cheap to run, so if we're running some event, such as our annual festival, (Quazfest) he's the guy who goes around all the towns in a 10 mile radius placing posters in shop windows. I get the tickets printed and posted to me and organise ticket outlets (usualy music shops) and he drops them off for sale and then goes around again and collects any ticket money and unsold tickets after the event.

If someone does screw up in their deligated job, it should be the band as a whole that gives them a hard time for it, not just the leader, because it's important that someone who screws up should feel like they've let the whole band down, not just the band leader.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Feb 11, 2008,