#1
I'm sure we've all had the problem when we know that one of our band mates is doing something in a song that sounds awful or their timing is just wrong. How do you tell them that they're wrong without sounding like a bastard or like you're insulting them?
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#2
I have the exact same problem. Don't how to tell 'em either. The only way I can think of is saying something like "I don't want to be an asshole or anything... You have to practice your timing."
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#3
I just tell them their a little off in said place and to watch out and see if they can fix it. Usually does the trick. I find it better to suggest rather than tell, most poeple can see whats wrong when their told to look for it.
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Last edited by Mettliccaa at Feb 9, 2008,
#4
idk. its realy hard i no it is. my drummer for the talent show i did was terrible but i was straight forward with him and said no fills and simplr drum beat to increase tempo
#5
as long as they don't mind mistakes being pointed out there shouldnt be a problem as long as your nice about it, and you don't mind people pointing out any mistakes you make.
just try and keep criticism constructive and you shouldn't have any trouble
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#6
Ya i basically do just suggest that they change things if they're doing them wrong but the bass player tends to take it personally...but i had to say it to him, he was playing slap during the really chilled out start part of Freebird and it sounded distasteful really
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#7
Quote by Bossman123
I'm sure we've all had the problem when we know that one of our band mates is doing something in a song that sounds awful or their timing is just wrong. How do you tell them that they're wrong without sounding like a bastard or like you're insulting them?

Record the session, play it back to everyone, then see if anyone else notices, especialy the person in question. If they don't, then just mention it, say something like. 'What are you playing there?' When he shows you what he's playing, say, 'Oh, I was playing this.' then show him the correct way. Then ask the rest of the band which they think is the correct way, as if you're unsure.
After all, you couldn't possibly be insulting anyone if you're unsure yourself, right.
Hopefully your band will collectively say that you are correct and he is wrong and he will realise that he is wrong and say something like 'Oh sorry, my mistake.'
This actualy works better if you also make a couple of deliberate mistakes on the recording and ask the band about those bits, then hold your hands up and say 'Yeah, your right, sorry, my mistake.'
The guy couldn't possibly act insulted about his bit without looking like a first class pillock.
#8
Make sure you only give constructive criticism and don't be too overbearing. Everyone in the band needs to be open to constructive criticism.
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#9
Quote by SlackerBabbath
Record the session, play it back to everyone, then see if anyone else notices, especialy the person in question. If they don't, then just mention it, say something like. 'What are you playing there?' When he shows you what he's playing, say, 'Oh, I was playing this.' then show him the correct way. Then ask the rest of the band which they think is the correct way, as if you're unsure.
After all, you couldn't possibly be insulting anyone if you're unsure yourself, right.
Hopefully your band will collectively say that you are correct and he is wrong and he will realise that he is wrong and say something like 'Oh sorry, my mistake.'
This actualy works better if you also make a couple of deliberate mistakes on the recording and ask the band about those bits, then hold your hands up and say 'Yeah, your right, sorry, my mistake.'
The guy couldn't possibly act insulted about his bit without looking like a first class pillock.

Actually that's really good, thanks man, that's great advice!!
MIA Fender Strat
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MXR Phase 90
Artec delay
#10
Quote by Bossman123
Actually that's really good, thanks man, that's great advice!!

You're welcome bud.
I've had to go to this extent myself with band members with huge egos, but it works, and what's more, it actualy trains by example everyone in the band to recognise their mistakes and admit to them in the knowledge that it really isn't a big deal.
A couple of deliberate mistakes now and again is a very small price to pay for the relaxed attitude among the rest of the band, but don't do it too often, or they might sack you in favour of a better musician.
#11
Quote by SlackerBabbath
You're welcome bud.
I've had to go to this extent myself with band members with huge egos, but it works, and what's more, it actualy trains by example everyone in the band to recognise their mistakes and admit to them in the knowledge that it really isn't a big deal.
A couple of deliberate mistakes now and again is a very small price to pay for the relaxed attitude among the rest of the band, but don't do it too often, or they might sack you in favour of a better musician.


It is totally based upon the maturity of the individual. If they really care about the band, they will want to know their mistakes to keep from bringing others down.
#12
Quote by HelpTravesty
It is totally based upon the maturity of the individual. If they really care about the band, they will want to know their mistakes to keep from bringing others down.

True, but let's face it, being a member of a band isn't exactly a sign of maturity. Working in an office is mature, but bands tend to attract immature people, or as we musicians like to say, 'people of an artistic disposition.'
Ego's come along with the territory, we can either deal with them by example (it really has to be by example because when you just tell someone they're wrong and you're right, then your own ego is becoming a problem) and try to get everyone to relax, or spend the rest of our lives going through musician after musician trying to find the right line up where everyone just naturaly clicks and egos don't appear.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Feb 9, 2008,
#13
Quote by SlackerBabbath
True, but let's face it, being a member of a band isn't exactly a sign of maturity. Working in an office is mature, but bands tend to attract immature people, or as we musicians like to say, 'people of an artistic disposition.'
Ego's come along with the territory, we can either deal with them and try to get everyone to relax, or spend the rest of our lives going through musician after musician trying to find the right line up where everyone just naturaly clicks and egos don't appear.


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#15
^+1
ive always found that the word "try" helps so much. i mean how much better does "try this" sound than "do it this way"?

answer: a lot.
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#16
Quote by Bossman123
I'm sure we've all had the problem when we know that one of our band mates is doing something in a song that sounds awful or their timing is just wrong. How do you tell them that they're wrong without sounding like a bastard or like you're insulting them?


I have that problem because i'm the only one in my band that knows any theory. I know it sounds like i'm being an ass when i tell the others they're doing something wrong but i don't care, because we all get along really well when we're not working on anything/taking a break. I'd rather just point out the mistake to them straight away, rather than having to hear them play it wrong time after time. the longer you leave it, the more awkward it becomes. also when a band is first jamming together it can take time for everyone to get used to how each other works, and this can be awkward when pointing out mistakes, but everyone gets used to it and it'll help you to work together as a band.
#17
honestly? i just say, "dude, can you play that part for me?" or "you're playing the chorus wrong, we need to go over that"

Maybe i'm a bit brutal, but all my bands have been amazing.