#1
Did any composers compose for using weird instruments? I mean, classical stuff is largely piano, violin, some flute and that's a big chunk of it.

Are there any good classical era guitarists? harpsichord? organ (I know of bach's good stuff)? other?

Thanks!
#2
I'm not sure but I believe that in the classical era that guitars were considered common peoples instruments and they were largely constricted to folk music, the guitar only become used in classical type music in the 1800s at the earliest? Just I dont expect you to find alot (or any) of classical era music written for guitar.
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#4
For American folk, you'll get stuff like Camptown Races, Oh! Susanna, the Ballad of John Henry, etc, etc, that was before the Civil War. I'm sure there's sheet music for European folk songs, too.
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#5
Quote by flashbandit
Did any composers compose for using weird instruments? I mean, classical stuff is largely piano, violin, some flute and that's a big chunk of it.

Are there any good classical era guitarists? harpsichord? organ (I know of bach's good stuff)? other?

Thanks!


'Classical stuff' is very vague. Most of the stuff you'd call classical (up to 19th century) was actually composed on harpsichord, clavichord, or fortepiano, since the modern piano is not that old. Most 'classical stuff' is played today on the paino because it's much more versatile than the old chordophones but can still embody their sonic features.
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#6
It depends on what you mean by "Classical."

If you mean the actual Classical period itself, then I would have to say no (I don't know every single piece of every single composer of that era, so maybe someone did). There is a very simple reason for why I would make this sort of guess, the guitar does not project well enough in that setting, so even if they wanted to use it, they really couldn't. The whole reason the whole electrical guitar thing started was trying to compensate for the fact guitars had trouble cutting through other instruments.

If you just mean the generic way that most people use the term "Classical music" then yes there are quite a few. In that sense the term is referring to a kind of music, so modern composers in that style are still counted.

Really though, the best examples of guitar being used for this type of music are the neo-classical metal guitarists and many of the classical guitarists. They may sound completely different, but from a musical standpoint they are often quite similar (part of that is probably due to the fact a lot of the neo-classical shredders do have training in Classical guitar).
#7
Quote by Matheau
Really though, the best examples of guitar being used for this type of music are the neo-classical metal guitarists and many of the classical guitarists. They may sound completely different, but from a musical standpoint they are often quite similar (part of that is probably due to the fact a lot of the neo-classical shredders do have training in Classical guitar).

A lot of those neo-classical guitarists also transposed violin pieces to guitar. Prime example are Paganini's caprices.
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#9
Quote by Peanut1614
I'm not sure but I believe that in the classical era that guitars were considered common peoples instruments and they were largely constricted to folk music, the guitar only become used in classical type music in the 1800s at the earliest? Just I dont expect you to find alot (or any) of classical era music written for guitar.


Very good post. Fernando Sor (yeah, the guy who wrote the famous studies) essentially legitimized the guitar as an instrument worthy of advanced study and standardized a technique for playing it. He also wrote repertoire that reinforced this.

Before the guitar existed, there was the lute. Most famous composers for lute were Bach (his Lute suites are amazing) in the Baroque era and John Dowland in the Renaissance. The lute faced similar challenges as guitar, as it was largely considered a folk instrument, but through the efforts of Dowland and Bach and others, it was legitimized as a 'proper' instrument.

The problem with the lute was that the instrument itself was never really standardized. There were varying numbers of strings from region to region and from time period to time period, which made reading and writing for it very complicated. As a result, it basically died off in favour of the more standardized (and arguably simplified) guitar.

CT
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#11
Yeah, I was gonna mention John Dowland and the lute.
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#12
Quote by tubab0y
Yeah, I was gonna mention John Dowland and the lute.


John Dowland ruled the Renaissance Lute.

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CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

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#13
Quote by axemanchris
Before the guitar existed, there was the lute. Most famous composers for lute were Bach (his Lute suites are amazing) in the Baroque era and John Dowland in the Renaissance.
+1 Very cool. I was gonna bring up Bach's suites too. I believe, that the first instruments that could be called "guitars" and not a lute or vihuela, actually did come out in the late 14th century. Which actually predates the vihuela. Extremely ornamental, with the figure 8 shape, straight neck,with frets made out of guts and a round back like a lute but differentiated from the flat back of the vihuela. Stradivari is known to have made guitars as well because of their popularity in Italy. <-too bad it was way different from the modern guitar or else we could say F*** your Gibson, mines a Stradivarius!

But of course...everything about OUR guitars, we owe to the Spanish luthier Antonio de Torres Jurado. Tarrega was probably the first to popularize the modern guitar, and Fernando Sor, like mentioned, the first to truly carve a place for it in history.
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#14
Look up the cimbalom. The most famous use is in Kodaly's "Hary Janos."
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#15
Quote by flashbandit
Were there any folk singers in the 1800s (or less) that wrote down anything? I mean, any songs that lasted?

There are loads of Troubador and Trouvier songs from the 1200's onward that have been preserved. There's lots of other early song genres from the Renascence and earlier, like motets, madrigals, etc. There's even one or two ancient Greek songs have been preserved and translated to modern musical notation.
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