#1
I was watching my Led Zeppelin DVD and happened to noticed during Dazed and Confused in the Albert Hall part on the first DVD...Jimmy has his strings going over the top of the Tune-o-matic bridge. As in the strings are put through the bridge going away from the neck then pulled over top of the bridge. That's the best way I can explain it, hopefully you guys get the picture.

What does this do? I don't know if it would hurt the guitar or not but I'm just curious. It looks cool too.
#4
When Gibson designed the Les Paul there was no such thing as 9ga electric guitar strings. They designed the guitar to have 12 through 52 gauge strings. Putting such a light gauge string on a the Les Paul causes a slight intonation problem. ( b and G strings are Flat) By putting the strings through the stop tail backwards lengthens the scale of the guitar, fixing this problem. This will cause some scaring on the stop tail this is why most people don't do this! It dose look cool
#5
Quote by Styles Music
When Gibson designed the Les Paul there was no such thing as 9ga electric guitar strings. They designed the guitar to have 12 through 52 gauge strings. Putting such a light gauge string on a the Les Paul causes a slight intonation problem. ( b and G strings are Flat) By putting the strings through the stop tail backwards lengthens the scale of the guitar, fixing this problem. This will cause some scaring on the stop tail this is why most people don't do this! It dose look cool

I don't know about the flat problem... I don't seem to have that problem with mine. Though I know some artist do this. I have spotted some but I can't remember exactly who.