#1
example; in major the chords are; major minor minor major major minor diminished, is their a pattern if your in phrygian ?
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#4
If you're using chord progressions with things like that, you're not playing Phrygian, or any mode for that matter.

EDIT for clarity: modal music stays on one chord primarily, and uses melody to create feeling, not harmony. so, yeah, phrygian starts on the third note of ionian, yeah, but when you change chords, bam, no longer phrygian. is what i meant.

DOUBLE EDIT: i don't know why i bother. the pattern for the phrygian is the same as what you would be get if you started on the third of the ionian. what you're saying is what i was trying to say.
Last edited by bananaboy at Feb 10, 2008,
#5
^ yes bananaboy, he is. you can definately use chords in phrygian.

and read the link in BGC's sig as he suggested.
#6
Quote by bananaboy
If you're using chord progressions with things like that, you're not playing Phrygian, or any mode for that matter.

EDIT for clarity: modal music stays on one chord primarily, and uses melody to create feeling, not harmony. so, yeah, phrygian starts on the third note of ionian, yeah, but when you change chords, bam, no longer phrygian. is what i meant.



modes are not the second third or forth note...etc of the ionian scale

they have a root note and different intervals than the ionian scale although you may find some modes and major scales are identical. they are not the same.

they are aplied to different things

for simplicity you cannot apply d dorian to C maj. they have the same notes but are very different. D dorian is not the C maj scale starting from the second note
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