#4
Quote by qotsa1998
Alot of celtic stuff is in Ionian i think.

WOW... You do realize that the Ionian mode is simply the major scale, don't you? same way that the aeolian mode is the natural minor/descending melodic scale
Gear:
Ibanez RG121
Ibanez GTA15R Amp
red Allegro nylon-strung acoustic of unkown model



Quote by Mechanix

We play guitar.... we're automatically on top of the world.

^
#5
Quote by Jastul
WOW... You do realize that the Ionian mode is simply the major scale, don't you? same way that the aeolian mode is the natural minor/descending melodic scale


i think some people may disagree with that.

although the major scale and the ionian scale are the same, a song written in Ionian is not necessarily writted in Major. the same with minor/aeolian.


Key based music is thought of differently to modal music.
#6
Quote by branny1982
i think some people may disagree with that.

although the major scale and the ionian scale are the same, a song written in Ionian is not necessarily writted in Major. the same with minor/aeolian.


Key based music is thought of differently to modal music.


could you explain that? every time i think i understand the difference between key based music and modal music something pops up and makes me realize i was wrong.
#7
Quote by Jastul
WOW... You do realize that the Ionian mode is simply the major scale, don't you? same way that the aeolian mode is the natural minor/descending melodic scale


No it isn't. Ionian is not major, and aeolian is not minor. Modal music is extremely rigid, whereas key based music allows for extensive alterations to the backing harmony. They are not the same thing.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#8
Hold up there, Archeo. While "key of G major" allows for some chromaticism while "G Ionian" does not, is it wrong to say that G Ionian is different than the G major scale?

At this point, I disagree with you on the point that Ionian/Aeolian differ from Natural Major/Minor, but I'll give you an opportunity to change my opinion.
#9
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Hold up there, Archeo. While "key of G major" allows for some chromaticism while "G Ionian" does not, is it wrong to say that G Ionian is different than the G major scale?

At this point, I disagree with you on the point that Ionian/Aeolian differ from Natural Major/Minor, but I'll give you an opportunity to change my opinion.


I would say that there are significant practical differences in their use, and that a song "in aeolian" is different one "in minor". Aeolian implies very specific intervals, and once you deviate from them, you are no longer "in aeolian". Minor, however, allows for all sorts of alterations. I can borrow chords from parallel keys, I can create a major V chord, I can use a bII7 chord, I can even end on a major tonic chord if I want that effect. Key based music is extremely flexible compared to modal music.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#11
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Agreed. But that doesn't answer my question (sorry).

Is it wrong to say that G Ionian is different from THE G major scale? (not the key of G major)


In theory, I'd agree that they're the same thing. But in practice, I'd say that they are used quite differently.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#13
Quote by Jastul
WOW... You do realize that the Ionian mode is simply the major scale, don't you? same way that the aeolian mode is the natural minor/descending melodic scale


So what if Celtic music uses Ionian, is that so surprising?

I don't see why you have to get all excited about it.
#15
Quote by ouchies
So what if Celtic music uses Ionian, is that so surprising?

I don't see why you have to get all excited about it.


It should also be pointed out to him that Celtic music tends to be modal, not key based. It is rarely in "major".
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#16
Listen to some world music..... Celtic also uses alot of Mixolydian (1,2,3,4,5,6,b7)
Flamenco uses alot of Phrygian: (1,b2,3b,4,5,b6,b7) and Phrygian Domminant: (1,b2,3,4,5,b6,b7)... A fair bit of Dream Theater is preety modal.... For example the intro to Trial Of Tears is a great base for some Ab Mixolydian fun....
Frank Zappa's not dead. He just smells funny.
#17
I don't know much about Celtic music, but I've heard a few songs in a minor key (or mode, whatever) and some a completely true to the mode. While most of us would use a major V chord, because it is awesome, the one song I'm thinking of uses a minor v chord, making it pure Aeolian.
#19
Traditional Irish/Scottish music. As well, check out this crazy jazz piano player named Eldar.
Quote by corduroyEW
Cheap amps are "that bad". They suck up your tone like cocaine at Kate Moss' party.


I am Michael!
#20
Quote by linfield44
what's celtic music, im not familiar with the genre
Irish and Scotish music. Maybe it includes all ancient Anglo-Saxon culture, I don't know. You know the song in the beginning of "The Boondock Saints?" That's Celtic Music, or at least in that style.
#21
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Irish and Scotish music. Maybe it includes all ancient Anglo-Saxon culture, I don't know. You know the song in the beginning of "The Boondock Saints?" That's Celtic Music, or at least in that style.



oh that's sweet, i love that kind of music
#22
Pretty much European music that is pre-18th century. In my understanding of it, until around Bach's time as certain tempered tunings(basically the 12 keys) were introduced, everything was rigidly fixed around the mode. This predates back to Ancient Greece - hence modes are named after different peoples of the Mediterranean. Like the Ionians and the Lydians because of the unique sounds of the music they were known for when there really wasn't much of a developed idea of "tunings".

But to actually listen to true modal music, you're gonna want to look up Gregorian chants - or simply old-church music. It doesn't get more modal then that!

And of course...heavy metal!
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#23
Quote by KryptNet
Pretty much European music that is pre-18th century. In my understanding of it, until around Bach's time as certain tempered tunings(basically the 12 keys) were introduced, everything was rigidly fixed around the mode. This predates back to Ancient Greece - hence modes are named after different peoples of the Mediterranean. Like the Ionians and the Lydians because of the unique sounds of the music they were known for when there really wasn't much of a developed idea of "tunings".

But to actually listen to true modal music, you're gonna want to look up Gregorian chants - or simply old-church music. It doesn't get more modal then that!

And of course...heavy metal!



hahaha thanks for the inputs
#24
Could somebody give me a recommendation of a modal jazz song? I've heard key based music, but I don't know that I've ever heard any modal music.
Got Death Magnetic a day early!

The Low-Cardinal of Zeppelinism - If you're a diehard fan of Zeppelin, join Zeppelinism here


Winner of the "Biggest Led Zeppelin Fuck" award in the CR forum (2 years running!)
#25
music that doesn't revolve around chord progressions, some indian music is just based off one chord, or jazz or classical music that's just sort of all over the place

i think it's hard to listen to