#1
I'm thinking of dropping out of college. I'm a freshman and the experience has been fun, but I have no desire to continue to routinely study, go to class, and then drink on the weekends. I guess I'm just sick of school. It has consumed my life for over a decade and I'm ready for something else. The benefits of having a college degree seem endless, yet I'm not ambitious and do not care about my potential income. Pit, what should I do?
#2
go work in the good ol' service sector for like half a year, you will come crawling back to college. Believe me on this, i know.
Gear:
Jackson Dinky DK2L
Epiphone LP Standard
Yamaha Acoustic
Bugera 1990 w/ Peavey 2x12 cab
#3
Well, for one thing, drinking on the weekends isn't mandatory.

The important thing is to view it as an investment. If you don't enjoy it, think about how much happier you'll be when you have enough money to live comfortably and have the things you want, and potentially support a family. Do you want a family? A college education is a good step towards that, and college is a great place to meet like-minded women.
I <3 bangoodcharlotte

Quote by humperdunk
one time i let my cat has cheezburger. i thought it was pretty funny.
#4
I reckon you should just take a break - do something else for a year or two, then go back.
█████ █████ █████ █████ █████ █████ █████ █████
█████ █████ █████ █████ █████ █████ █████ █████
█████ █████ █████ █████ █████ █████ █████ █████

You're just another brick in the wall
#5
how far into it are you? if you're only just starting then go get a job, doing something you like. If you've only got like, a year left, then just finish it off, get a better job.
#6
Quote by Pliant
I'm thinking of dropping out of college. I'm a freshman and the experience has been fun, but I have no desire to continue to routinely study, go to class, and then drink on the weekends. I guess I'm just sick of school. It has consumed my life for over a decade and I'm ready for something else. The benefits of having a college degree seem endless, yet I'm not ambitious and do not care about my potential income. Pit, what should I do?


you and I share a lot

don't drop out, finish, then do what you want to do

if you ever decide to come back a dropout looks awful on a transcript


I am taking a year off to find...something, then I'll see
good luck
Last.Fm

“If there was anything that depressed him more than his own cynicism, it was that quite often it still wasn't as cynical as real life.”
― Terry Pratchett

qft...



Jeremy Clarkson is a knob.
#7
agreed....get a job somewhere anywhere because you'll probably have to take the first one you get unless you're parents got money to support you in which case theres no helping you in the first place & after a few months to a years at said job you'll be ready to go back to college....
#8
I would recommend staying in school and finding a new routine. I agree with you on the schooling part, but my activities outside of academia help make up for it. Or what also got me down and made me really want to drop out too was me choosing a crappy major. I finally changed it to something else though, and now I'm pretty excited about school again. So in short, I'd say try harder to find your comfort zone, and if you're still bummed, then I suppose school may not be for everyone. Just be sure you know what else you'd do with your life, and not just live at home with your parents or something. good luck
#9
Quote by Pliant
I'm thinking of dropping out of college. I'm a freshman and the experience has been fun, but I have no desire to continue to routinely study, go to class, and then drink on the weekends. I guess I'm just sick of school. It has consumed my life for over a decade and I'm ready for something else. The benefits of having a college degree seem endless, yet I'm not ambitious and do not care about my potential income. Pit, what should I do?



If you think this is a routine then wait till' you start working. College was the best years of my life. You should give it a chance - join clubs and societies, make new friend, drink during the week. College is supposed to be fun, if you're not happy then maybe it's the course you're doing and not the college experience?
Quote by jimtaka
i'd say your guitar is out of tune, or you are accidentally muting strings that you aren't trying to, or your right hand isn't strumming at the same time that your left hand is fretting, or you could be reading the tab upside down...
#10
Quote by DZCunuck
go work in the good ol' service sector for like half a year, you will come crawling back to college. Believe me on this, i know.


He is right. I speak from personal experience. But if you are really tired of it take a break I suppose. I don't think it would be the best of decisions but everyone has individual expectations and hopes of their.
#11
I still remember that abortion of a troll thread you started yesterday, so my recommendation is that you quit college as hastily as possible.
"There he goes. One of God's own prototypes. Some kind of high powered mutant never even considered for mass production. Too weird to live, and too rare to die."-Duke
#12
Should have taken a gap year like I am going to.
Listen to The Sounds Inside
John Frusciante
#13
A semester long sabbatical may be helpful. You could work in the meantime, which would help you appreciate the college experience even more (or possibly not, given that your experiences may be very different).

I had academic troubles myself freshman year due to excessive partying and lack of motivation, but am on more solid footing these days. Cutting down on the drinking helped quite a bit. So did a reappraisal of what my intentions were in regards to attending university. I think the senior-itis from my last year of high school wore off in the first term (plus the grade shock experienced), which helped make for a better second and later terms. It still sucks at times, but university is a great experience overall, a life-shaping one at that. Personally, I find that the upsides outweigh the downsides. Sometimes it doesn't feel that way, but once I shake off lingering negativity/pessimism I see things in more optimistic terms again.

I wouldn't advise dropping out of school, and highly suggest looking at other options before going through with it. A sabbatical filled with work/vacation (depending on how you feel) could be instrumental in helping you work out the issues that are bothering you. Counseling services, discussing this subject with your parents, tutoring, a change of scenery (short vacation), meeting new people / friends, taking some classes on interesting topics that you know nothing about (two things: this could maybe inspire a change of major or it could force you to endure a class you hate, finding the motivation to delve into a unknown field is a necessary part of the process. Also, the professor is much more important than the subject so choose classes accordingly), joining some organizations or clubs on campus, etc, could all help get you out of this rut. You may want to consider some of these suggestions.


As for your situation in general, aside from the issues of college life and academics, I think you need to look elsewhere. You mention lack of ambition and apathy in your post. These sentiments could deter you from achieving your full potential by prompting you to drop out of school. They could also affect you at any other part of your life, far after college. You may want to think about your life in general and what it means to you. What do you really want to do? If you give in to apathy now how will you be able to confront it and other problems later on in life? A break from school could help you deal with these questions, but dropping out will likely complicate things and make it even harder to change course. It might not just be school that is bothering you but life in general. The capricious and unknown future looms menacingly over the horizon as the comfort and stability of the high-school and family environment fades into the past. University is often a time when life gives you a wake-up smack to the face, so thoughts of quitting are understandable. Just be sure of what you are doing before making any rash decisions.

I can't help you with specific stuff other than give you the suggestions above. However, I will say that while freshman year was one of the funnest times of my life, it didn't last forever. Things change quite a bit in the transition from freshman to sophmore year, and people approach school fairly differently between the two years. It doesn't get easier, but there is a light at the end of the tunnel. Maybe by sophmore year you will have worked this out of your system and feel much better about school with a year's period of adjustment to get used to the new environment. Hope everything goes well for you.