#1
Hey All

Im pretty new to this homerecording.

Im using Cubase SX 3 with EZ Drummer + DFH exp. For guitars i use a Guitarport with metal shop, and the sound kicks ass when im just playing.

When i record i usualy do 4 guitar tracks. 2 in each side. Then i have 2 different "guitar sounds" i record. And each sound goes in each direction, if that makes sense.

Ok, so here is my problem really. When i put on some drum tracks, and mix a bit so that the guitars and the drums dont drown eachother out, then export a mixdown it sounds flat and dull. I dont get that nice huge wall of sound experience, that you get from normal records. Maybe i just need a little something here and there. But some advice woul be nice.

Sample
#2
I'm really not sure what you're trying to achieve, that mix sounds great. If you're looking for a bit more power in the guitars, around the 400Hz is the power frequency. To destinguish each guitar a little better you can pick a frequency between 3000Hz and 4000Hz (IE left guitar 32000Hz and right guitar 3800Hz) with a Q of around 2 and give each a 6dB boost. I'm listening to your mix with my studio monitors and they sound great.
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#3
read this
http://www.recordingwebsite.com/articles/eqprimer.php

when you quadtrack guitars you're not supposed to put them all 100% panned if that's what you're doing
should 100 & 80 left...80 & 100 right

the drums are what's sounding most dull to me, have the snare & kick on their own channels so you can EQ them better. & throw in a gate to get rid of that recording hiss & crackle you got there from the guitar input
#4
OK just to clarify.

The static noise you can hear is my old CRT monitor getting picked up by my guitar. When i figured out to make a better mix i'll redo them completely anyways.

The 4 guitar were done with 2 different "sounds" / patches. Each patch goes both left and right. There is a darker one, and a more trebly one.

The dark guitar patch is panned 85% L and R
the trebly guitar patch is panned 100% L and R.

Oh and the dark guitar patch is only about 80% of the volume as the trebly one.

Yeah the drums sound completely rubbish, i know that. I just haven't found the greatest drum mixing guide yet. I wanted to get the guitars right first.

Thanks for the advice.
#5
Quote by Crazy Drummer69
I'm really not sure what you're trying to achieve, that mix sounds great. If you're looking for a bit more power in the guitars, around the 400Hz is the power frequency. To destinguish each guitar a little better you can pick a frequency between 3000Hz and 4000Hz (IE left guitar 32000Hz and right guitar 3800Hz) with a Q of around 2 and give each a 6dB boost. I'm listening to your mix with my studio monitors and they sound great.


Thanks for the advice, im definately gonna try this out.
#7
IMO, The reason that ^ recording sounds more beastly than yours is because they have a bass (Edit: or more bass). However, the drums are also louder and more echoey (Edit2: Especially the overheads. Also i think that they might have added some light overdrive to the drums).
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Last edited by bartdevil_metal at Feb 11, 2008,
#9
Ok, now we're at it. Could someone maybe explain to me, what the difference is or should be between mixing and mastering?

//EDIT:

Ahh, i see. Mixing is where you EQ, fx and do other things to each track individualy.
Mastering is where you do it to all the tracks combined.
Last edited by ShredNChunk at Feb 11, 2008,
#10
Compared to your track the reference you have seems to be EQ'd differently. There's definitely compression on the directs on the kick and snare and it sounds a little bit as if he's compressed the overheads a lot and added some slight overdrive (probably applied a low cut as well). The bass is an obvious addition, at least I couldn't hear one on your track. The reference has also been mastered; sounds like a loudness curve on the EQ, some multi-band compression and a decent hit of limiting.

One thing that's very obvious though is that you have some timing issues on some riffs, the opening riff could really groove but you're missing the downbeats by just a hair (and it's a bit upsetting really). Fixing that will make the entire track better even if you don't remix it.
#11
Yeah i dont know how the timing issues really arose. The project has seen alot of experimenting. If you notice all 4 guitar tracks are pretty tight, but they are all 4 a little off from the drums. I think i once nodged something.'

But yeah the bass track isnt present atm. And the drums utterly suck i will redo the mix on those.

And i will redo the guitar tracks; all 4 of them. I have a better sound patch now, a better guitar, and i want that static noise out of there.
#12
Try some eq'ing but the main thing that is setting your mixes apart from commercial mixes is a professional mixing job, which will really widen and give life to your mix especially since your source tracks sound good.
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#14
I really, really dislike your panning. You have them panned way too far apart imo. That is why your guitar sound isn't as thick and punchy. Move them from 85/100 to 65/80 and see if that helps. It should pull them in some and thicken up the sound. You lay down multiples tracks to thicken up the sound, not to segregate them so much.

You really do need the bass in there too. A good bass line will really help the overall sound, as it is lacking some low end. Are you using a multi-band compressor on the final mix? You could bring up your bottom end a little bit, while leaving the rest alone, if you do that.
#15
Quote by ShredNChunk
Ok thanks for the advice everyone. I tried rearranging the EQ abit on the existing guitar tracks.

Here are the results:
Sample w/ new EQ

you're EQing wrong...you're taking out all the bass from your guitar, you should only be trying to get rid of the 50-80hz sections you should beef them up at bout 100hz
you don't seem to have bass guitars so you can probably go even lower. you just wanna keep the guitars bass from cutting into the kick drums bass which is usually in the 50-70 region the bass guitar from about 60-100. that's why your guitars sound little compared to others. what moves the speakers is air, without the boom the speakers stay flat creating that dull sound

don't worry about mastering till you get your mixing down perfectly
#16
Quote by DeathDealer
you're EQing wrong...you're taking out all the bass from your guitar, you should only be trying to get rid of the 50-80hz sections you should beef them up at bout 100hz
you don't seem to have bass guitars so you can probably go even lower. you just wanna keep the guitars bass from cutting into the kick drums bass which is usually in the 50-70 region the bass guitar from about 60-100. that's why your guitars sound little compared to others. what moves the speakers is air, without the boom the speakers stay flat creating that dull sound

don't worry about mastering till you get your mixing down perfectly


Hmm, ok. Thanks for the heads up. I think my downfall is my Sennheisser headphones. They are really bassy. So it sounds really bassy when i mix. But when i hear it afterwards in other listening environments i think it sounds dull.
#17
First, don't mix on headphones.

Use headphones (a good set) to do some dynamic processing and perhaps delays or even reverb - to tweak each track effects and timing wise and all the real fine details of it.

When mixing, use a set of decent loudspeakers. It will give you a much more defined and accurate sound with an acoustic presence - the sound is real versus inside your head.
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