#3
does that mean its the 7th note in the scale.... the note before the octave
#5
It should be noted that the 7th degree is generally only referred to as the "leading tone" when it is a major 7th from the root (and therefore a half-step from the octave) Otherwise, it's called the sub-tonic.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#6
^interesting

This is something i asked about a while ago. Each degree in the major scale has its label, Dominant, Mediant etc etc....
...my question was, do these change scale to scale? surely it makes no sense to call the 5th degree of the minor scale the Dominant degree?
#7
Quote by Archeo Avis
It should be noted that the 7th degree is generally only referred to as the "leading tone" when it is a major 7th from the root (and therefore a half-step from the octave) Otherwise, it's called the sub-tonic.


I was wondering about the other names. If I am correct it goes like this

I = tonic
bII = ???
II = supertonic
bIII = minor mediant
III = mediant
IV = subdominant
bV = ???
V = dominant
bVI = minor submediant
VI = submediant
bVII = subtonic
VII = leading tone

Are these correct?
What are the correct names for bII and bV, as well as any I may have listed which were incorrect?
#8
Quote by isaac_bandits
I was wondering about the other names. If I am correct it goes like this

I = tonic
bII = ???
II = supertonic
bIII = minor mediant
III = mediant
IV = subdominant
bV = ???
V = dominant
bVI = minor submediant
VI = submediant
bVII = subtonic
VII = leading tone

Are these correct?
What are the correct names for bII and bV, as well as any I may have listed which were incorrect?


I'm honestly not sure if flatted VI/III etc. degrees are labeled as "minor". I'm relatively sure that most diatonic scale degrees retain their function (and by extension, their name) regardless of the mode, though some tonal center are obviously more decisive than others. I imagine it would change as you start moving into exotic and synthetic scales. For instance, in melodic major (1-2-3-4-5-b6-b7) the b6 actually functions as the leading tone, making the iv chord function as the dominant (use of the V chord will actually destroy the tonality)
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.