#1
How do I work out what scale chords come from? I was looking at the "name that chord" thread and it gave some chords and asked them to work out the scale they came from.
#2
a chord comes from its scale for example the A major chord is the first third and fifth notes of the A major scale
#3
you can't really do it with just one chord.... unless it is a chord typical of a mode, like a #11 chord etc

with a progression, you try to find out how it resolves, or find the key signature and work from there.

i would write down every note used and find the key they fit... then find the resolution, that is generally the answer.
#5
Quote by punked out N
he wasnt refering to keys he was refering to chord structures my awnser was correct


An A major chord is found in a number of scales. It would be far better to describe chords based on their intervals.
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#7
Quote by punked out N
he wasnt refering to keys he was refering to chord structures my awnser was correct


The name that chord thread is a little weird...they list tabs with a single chord-shape so theoretically, the notes can be part of a whole bunch of different chords hence build off of different scales.

To threadstarter: Like everyone else mentioned above, a working knowledge of popular progressions in different key signatures would help you boil the choices down to the most commonly used type of chord. Then apply your scale formulas.

Probably the easiest would be to play the chord, hear what it sounds like, then see what scale position that chord was *most likely* built upon. <-easier said then done.

EDIT:
Quote by punked out N
its created based off of its magor chord and i discussed intervals 1st 3rd and 5th
yes you did, but an Amaj chord could also be made from a host of different scales. If the Amaj was the IV chord of a progression, then the chord intervals of 1st, 3rd, and 5th would be built on the 4^, 6^, and 1^ of the Emin scale...and would have nothing to do with Amaj scale.
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Last edited by KryptNet at Feb 11, 2008,
#8
or u could just take the route note look at the route notes scale see what intervals its bassed off of...
#9
take a scale .

count up the scale in 3rds .
this will give you the chords form the scale .
the main expections by sus2 and sus4 chords .

SO in the key of A natural minor :

A,B,C,D,E,F,G

YOU COUNT :
A,C,E,G = Aminor7
keep Going from G =
B,D,F = Aminor flat 13 eugh !

you are not limited to starting on A even through the key may be you could start on any of the other notes in the A minor scale .
I hope this information is clear and to the point for you.
#10
Quote by punked out N
its created based off of its magor chord and i discussed intervals 1st 3rd and 5th


Yeah, but to use your example A Major chord is in the A major scale, but it's also in
D major and E major. That's just the "major" scales. You can also find in the
harmonic minor and melodic minor to name a couple of more.
#11
Quote by bass wizard
How do I work out what scale chords come from? I was looking at the "name that chord" thread and it gave some chords and asked them to work out the scale they came from.

Well if your just learning how to make a basic chord.... that thread is a little over your head. You really need to spend some time with basic theory (for awhile) and then revisit it.

What your asking is a bigger question than you realize, and the answer relies on you understanding a number of basic things. I dont think anyone here could truly answer you in one thread. (some are sure to argue with each other about it as they try though).

A triad is constructed from the root, 3rd, and 5th of a scale

You can find a Major triad by find the R,3,&5 of a Major scale with the note in question as the root.


C Major scale = C,D,E,F,G,A,B,C

C Major triad = C,E,G

G Major scale = G,A,B,C,D,E,F#,G

G Major triad = G, B, D


This works for minor as well


A minor scale = A,B,C,D,E,F,G

A minor triad = A,C,E

D minor scale = D,E,F,G,A,Bb,C,D

D minor triad = D,F,A


So if you know a scale (and its key signature) you can find its tonic triad by finding the Root,3rd and 5th of the scale.


Now it can get a bit more complicated than that, but that is a good place to start.


You may also want to learn triads/chords from their intervalic relationships..... but that assumes you have a good knowledge of intervals.... if you dont this wont mean a thing to you.


Major triad:

Major 3rd and a Perfect 5th (from the root)
or M3 + m3

minor triad:

minor 3rd and a perfect 5th (from the root)
or m3 + M3


so thats some of the basics. Keep in mind that what you want to learn requires some true knowledge of this stuff. Your not going to get that here in a thread. You should study theory in a class.... or with a teacher. learn one concept at a time and build on it.
eventually you will be able to answer questions like in the "name that chord" thread, but for now its really not very realistic.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Feb 11, 2008,