#1
Hi ive been learning guitar for about a week now, with my F310, ive learned a few chords and making alot of progress but im not sure if my guitar is in tune or not. I want to be able to tune it myself, ontop of that I cannot afford a tuner for a few weeks, I already overspent on getting a decent guitar.
Does anyone know if the F310 goes out of tune fast? How long will it stay in tune rougly? If anyone can tell me, I dont want to have to keep tuning it constantly

Another thing is that when I tune it using the technique of holding down the 5th fret (with the exeption of b) to tune it, if you get me, I can never get it to sound the same as the next string on open fret like it should, when I get them all as close as possible, it dosent sound in tune at all, bad enough that even I know that. Found this , which im sure alot of people know about, I tune it to the sound of the standard tuning going by the sounds it makes and then my guitar sounds in tune, but when I hold down the 5th fret of a string and play an open note on the next string, it is waaay off.
What im I doing wrong? will I keep it so that if for example I play a D note on the fith fret, it dosent sound anything like the D string on open? even though it sounds better than if I tune it to that method I stated erlier?
What will I do to make sure my guitar is in tune to the best that I can? Thanks if you read all that, I know im not making complete sense
#2
To be honest... If you just started playing guitar, you won't probably be able to tune it very accurate. The best solution is to purchase a simple tuner, cause you might get used to having your guitar out of tune... and that sucks man, believe me. First step to develop your "ear" is to have your instrument tuned You can always try using some internet programs which use a microphone. That's pretty cool. After some time, you'll be able to "hear" you guitar, to know if it's getting out of tune or not.
My Rig:

+Epiphone AJ100 acoustic
+Fender 60th. Anniversary Stratocaster
+Vox AD30VT
+Vox V847a Wah


look all i wanted was for someone to give me advice on what to do not to slag me off ok

Want advice? Suck yourself off.
#4
I tune it to the sound of the standard tuning going by the sounds it makes and then my guitar sounds in tune, but when I hold down the 5th fret of a string and play an open note on the next string, it is waaay off.


something is wrong. Either the strings are too high and you're pulling the note out of tune to fret it, or the strings are dead. If the guitar is in tune, it should be reasonably close when fretting the 5th and the open string below it. Intonation on an acoustic cannot be adjusted, but should be reasonably close from the factory, with new strings. When strings go dead they always lose intonation. Also you should fret with only enough finger pressure to get a clear note, mashing too hard will pull the notes out of tune too.

Try the harmonics. Touch the 6th string lightly at the 5th fret, directly above the fret and pick it, remove your finger quickly and let it ring. Then do the same on the 5th string at the 7th fret. Both should sound the same note if it's in tune. Then try the fretting/open string method. If it's not still in tune fretted your strings are probably dead if they aren't really high off the neck. If you hear it warble or oscillate slightly, it's a little out of tune, you can fine tune it by listening. The closer to in tune it gets the warbling will get much slower. When it stops it's in tune. You have to develop an ear for this, but it works well.

String height on an acoustic should usually be no more than about 1/8" off the frets at the octave, that would give you pretty decent action. Some guitars may be lower, some higher, it depends on how it was set up originally and how low it can be set without fret buzz. If it's higher than about 3/16" you may be pulling the strings out of tune when fretting.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#5
^ The harmonic 5/7 method of tuning should NOT be used. Harmonics at those points are called "pure intervals", and are obtained without fretting the strings, not to mention not being able to get a decent harmonic at the B string. A guitar is an equal tempered instrument, meaning that the frets are all placed out on the fretboard to give the best approximation of accuracy across all the strings and all frets. When you play, you fret, so the guitar should be tuned by fretting.
Try out one of the online tuners and see if you can get the guitar tuned up by using one of those. Then check it this way:
Start out by getting a harmonic at the 12th fret of the low E string, then while it's ringing out, fret and play the A string at the 7th fret. The two notes should be exactly the same. Remember above what I said about pure intervals? The 12th fret is also a pure interval, but it's also an octave interval, meaning it's the same note as the open string at that point, so it can be used accurately to tune any guitar.
Ok, so you did E and A.
Next, do the harmonic at the 12th fret of the A string, followed by the fretted 7th of the D string. Same thing, they should both be the same note.
Next is 12th harmonic of the D, along with the fretted 7th of the G.
Now it needs to change just a tad. Do the 12th fret harmonic of the G string, but fretted note on the B string needs to be at the 8th fret this time.
Then lastly, 12th harmonic of B string, followed by the fretted 7th of the high E string.
Give this a try and see if it helps. After doing it a bunch of times, you'll have it memorized and be able to check your guitar very quickly, and accurately.
#6
Ok thanks for the help everyone very greatfull and good info it helped alot, I tried LeftyDave's way of doing it and I think im sorted :P