#1
So I've been playing for about 4 years with out lessons. I'm better than most I would say, but not quite great. One way I could improve that I think is through my solos.

but the problem with that is that I feel stuck when I do. I usually just stick to the pentatonic scale in one spot, Usually past the 12th fret, I just don't know how to go up or down with out sounding really amateur. And I've always admired those who can just play up and down the guitar with leisure.

Is there a practicing technique i could use to overcome this problem?

Any constructive input would be very much appreciated.
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#3
Your best bet is to learn the scales, I've also been playing for 4 years without lessons, but I know where to go on the neck. When you look at scales it'll eventually get to ya.
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#5
Seriously, download all of Kristopher Dahl's videos on UG. Shred Masterclass will give you a lot of techniques to practice. Helped me immensely, and he's pretty entertaining.
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#7
What you're looking for is exercises that get you thinking and working diagonally.... search the net for exercises that are diagonal in nature, starting with pentatonic since that's what you're used to....

Also, memorize the major scale in the 1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, and 12th positions... it seems daunting at first, but after a while you will soon see that it is just a few different fingering patterns repeating themselves in various orders... what I did was just give each 3 note pattern (ther's like 4 or 5 of them) a name, and use a pnemonic or little "story" in my head to memorize which one was at which position... seems silly at first but it works... the more silly the story the better cuz it sticks in your mind.

Cool thing is, once you learn the lame-ass major scale you find that each of it's modes (most of which are much more exotic, dark, and/or interesting) are in the same order of fingering patterns as you go up the neck, but just starting on a different one... kind of like how note names (A, B, C, D, etc.) are in the same order but you start on a different one for each key....

If you buy a book with all of the modes listed in it for a certain key and start learning each mode one by one, you will see what I mean.....

BTW, when soloing diagonally, you basically play 2-4 notes on one string, then go to the next string in the same position or "box", and play like 3 more, sliding up with your pinky for the fourth note, which automatically takes you to the next posiiton higher's box, and continue moving on to higher strings while sliding up every other string with your pinky..... when going down, you slide down with your index finger as a general rule.....

If that doesn't make sense, go buy this month's Guitar World magazine and look at the column by the jazz guy (forgot his name)..... he has a chart that takes you through that technique.... all you gotta do is transfer that technique to other scales and modes.......

Hope this helps.... ended up writing a novel here LOL.....
#8
Just learn pentatonic scales
simplest ****in thing
good soundin solos
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#10
Learn the major and minor scale shapes. The learn how to play them in whatever key by moving them up and down the fret board. From there, play it by ear. This should help you get started on phrasing.
#11
Quote by LesPaulPwns
What you're looking for is exercises that get you thinking and working diagonally.... search the net for exercises that are diagonal in nature, starting with pentatonic since that's what you're used to....

Also, memorize the major scale in the 1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, and 12th positions... it seems daunting at first, but after a while you will soon see that it is just a few different fingering patterns repeating themselves in various orders... what I did was just give each 3 note pattern (ther's like 4 or 5 of them) a name, and use a pnemonic or little "story" in my head to memorize which one was at which position... seems silly at first but it works... the more silly the story the better cuz it sticks in your mind.

Cool thing is, once you learn the lame-ass major scale you find that each of it's modes (most of which are much more exotic, dark, and/or interesting) are in the same order of fingering patterns as you go up the neck, but just starting on a different one... kind of like how note names (A, B, C, D, etc.) are in the same order but you start on a different one for each key....

If you buy a book with all of the modes listed in it for a certain key and start learning each mode one by one, you will see what I mean.....

BTW, when soloing diagonally, you basically play 2-4 notes on one string, then go to the next string in the same position or "box", and play like 3 more, sliding up with your pinky for the fourth note, which automatically takes you to the next posiiton higher's box, and continue moving on to higher strings while sliding up every other string with your pinky..... when going down, you slide down with your index finger as a general rule.....

If that doesn't make sense, go buy this month's Guitar World magazine and look at the column by the jazz guy (forgot his name)..... he has a chart that takes you through that technique.... all you gotta do is transfer that technique to other scales and modes.......

Hope this helps.... ended up writing a novel here LOL.....



Good advice. But ease off on the major scale. I can sound however I want using the major scale, and its necessary to write progressions. Nothing lame about it.
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#12
LOL I agree major scale is versatile...... I was just saying that to keep from scaring off people that THINK the major scale is worthless.....
#13
Do help get out of the "box" you should practice playing scales diagonally rather than strictly vertically, this way you have at least a 3 octave range. I've included a powertab file of one of the ways you could practice this; there are many different ways to do this.

I have made this assuming you have already memorized the various positions throughout the neck.

EDIT: I used the G Major scale, sorry I forgot to say. Hope it helps...
Attachments:
gmaj.zip